Wolf Pack Pantry Challenge (Week 7)

When it rains, it pours. You’ve had a terrible week and now it is time to do some problem solving. At some time during the night someone raided your garden. They must have been scouting your property, you realize, because they stripped your fruit trees right as the fruit began to ripen. They also got away with a significant amount of cabbage, potatoes and other high value vegetables.

You look for your dog, but you have no luck . . . until you happen upon her body. There is some half eaten meat by her body. You realize she has been poisoned.

If you found yourself in this situation, what would you do? Please post your suggestions below?

To make matters worse, you were hit with some nasty storms that have made it virtually impossible to hunt and fish. You have not been able to scavenge or trade. So this week, you have no “plus five” ingredients. You must prepare a Sunday dinner with just your food storage. You’ve served beans and rice all week. No one is complaining. But you would sure like to change things up a bit.

Wolf Pack Pantry Challenge (Week 6)

You have had an interesting and productive week. A member of your survival group has shot and cleaned a duck. From your garden, you have cabbage, sweet potatoes, and carrots. You have scavenged for several jars of marmalade. (These jars have been added to your list of staples.) What would you make with these ingredients? Please post your recipe below.

Scenario: We are in a grid down situation. We are already several months into the situation. There is no running water, no electricity, and no refrigeration. You are well stocked in the basic pantry staples and spices, you have some home canned foods and you have a garden that is actively producing a limited amount of fresh produce.

EASY SMALL BATCH SAUERKRAUT

  • 1 bag Angel Shred Coleslaw Cabbage
  • 1 ½ Teaspoons Kosher Salt

Empty bag of cabbage into a large glass or stainless steel bowl. Sprinkle the salt over the cabbage. Massage the cabbage by squeezing it all over with your hands for 5 to 10 minutes. It will become limp with some liquid. Firmly pack some in the bottom of a clean pint mason jar. Place more cabbage into the jar and firmly pack down each layer. You should be able to get all of the cabbage into the jar. Fill the jar up to the shoulder with any leftover liquid. If you don’t have enough liquid to cover make a water and salt brine.

Place the special jar lid on and fill the airlock to the middle with plain water and insert into the lid. Place in a cool dark place and you will have a mild sauerkraut in about 6 weeks. This will depend on the temperature where it is placed, a warmer location could have sped up the process and you will have kraut several weeks earlier. It is best to periodically check the process. For stronger kraut leave for a longer period.

To use the whole head of cabbage (approximately 2-pound size) remove outer leaves and cut cabbage into quarters and remove the core. Then cut each quarter in half. Set up the slicing plate in your food processor and feed the cabbage pieces into the food processor. Place shreds into a large glass or stainless steel bowl. Sprinkle with 1 tablespoon kosher salt and mix in. Place a kitchen towel over the bowl and let sit for 1 to 2 hours. Pack into a clean quart mason jar and pack down. Place the special jar lid on and the airlock in place.

These are the special lids that I use.

This is the wooden stomper that I use for packing down the cabbage: https://www.lehmans.com/product/wooden-stompers-for-meat-grinders

To stop the fermenting process remove the special lid and replace with a plastic canning jar lid and place in the refrigerator.

To can the sauerkraut process in a water bath. Bring sauerkraut to a simmer do not boil. Pack into hot jars. Leaving ½ inch head space. Remove air bubbles. Process pints for 15 minutes and quarts for 20 minutes.

Everything needed to prepare for a local disaster or even a total SHTF event can be found and purchased at your local Wal-Mart.

Prepper’s Checklist: everything needed to prepare for a local disaster or even a total SHTF event can be found and purchased at their local Wal-Mart.

Also see today’s post: Living In Small Places To The Extreme.

Wolf Pack Pantry Challenge (Week 5)

You have had a much better week. You have traded with another survival group for some goat. From your garden, you have potatoes, carrots, scotch bonnet peppers and fresh thyme. What would you make with these ingredients?

Scenario: We are in a grid down situation. We are already several months into the situation. There is no running water, no electricity, and no refrigeration. You are well stocked in the basic pantry staples and spices, you have some home canned foods and you have a garden that is actively producing a limited amount of fresh produce.

Wolf Pack Pantry Challenge

Scenario: We are in a grid down situation. We are already several months into the situation. There is no running water, no electricity, and no refrigeration. You are well stocked with the basic pantry staples and spices, you have some home canned foods and you have a garden that is actively producing a limited amount of fresh produce.

You also have several means of cooking at your disposal—BBQ grill, sun oven, volcano stove, camping stove, adobe pizza oven and open fire. Let’s imagine, for simplicities sake, that you don’t have to worry about the smoke from the campfire attracting anyone unwanted. There is also no issue about fuel. You have plenty of wood, propane, charcoal and so forth. You have a manual wheat grinder, cast iron skillets, Dutch oven, wok and other basic kitchen equipment.

Wolf Pack Pantry Challenge

Scenario: We are in a grid down situation. We are already several months into the situation. There is no running water, no electricity and no refrigeration. You are well stocked in the basic pantry staples and spices, you have some home canned foods and you have a garden that is actively producing a limited amount of fresh produce.

You also have several means of cooking at your disposal—BBQ grill, sun oven, volcano stove, camping stove, adobe pizza oven and open fire. Let’s imagine, for simplicities sake, that you don’t have to worry about the smoke from the campfire attracting anyone unwanted. There is also no issue about fuel. You have plenty of wood, propane, charcoal and so forth. You have a manual wheat grinder, cast iron skillets, Dutch oven, wok and other basic kitchen equipment.

A Mormon Walking Dead Cooking Show

Scenario: We are in a grid down situation. We are already several months into the situation. There is no running water and no electricity. You are well stocked in the basic pantry staples and spices, and you have a garden that is actively producing a limited amount of fresh produce.

You also have several means of cooking at your disposal—BBQ grill, sun oven, volcano stove, camping stove, adobe pizza oven and open fire. Let’s imagine, for simplicities sake, that you don’t have to worry about the smoke from the campfire attracting anyone unwanted. There is also no issue about fuel. You have plenty of wood, propane, charcoal and so forth. You have a manual wheat grinder, cast iron skillets, Dutch oven, wok and other basic kitchen equipment.

Infographic Ten Things to Do Now!

Many of you will recognize this list of ten things to do now from reading my article – The Preppers Checklist – Ten Things to do Now, that a is a popular and useful checklist for new preppers, to get started, so I thought that I would bring it back albeit in a different form, to reach more readers and to hopefully get more people prepping.

Please help me spread the word by sharing this list with everyone you know via email,  or any social media outlets that you are active in. Also feel free to re-post this infographic list on your blog or website, as long as a credit is given via a link-back to this post.  Thank you for your help…

The Prepper’s Food Storage Checklist

When it comes to storing enough food to survive, unassisted and on your own for three six-months or a full year or even longer is the point where most new preppers get overwhelmed and some even give up altogether. And while I agree that storing and rotating such a large amount of food on a continuing basis can be a lot of work and takes dedication, it is by no means impossible, and if done right can even be enjoyable.

But where do you start? You should start with the basics first wheat (or other grains, for those who have trouble digesting gluten), rice, beans, oats, corn, salt, honey, cooking oil and powdered milk.