Nuke Attack



1x1.trans Nuke Attack

By Ron G

The economy has collapsed, the world is in turmoil and someone discharged a nuke in New York City, He shares a well-stocked Bug Out location and has made the decision that it is time to get out of Dodge. He has carefully prepped the truck and camper over the last couple of days. He talked it over with his close knit and like-minded Crew of 5. They all agreed, now is the time to Bug Out.

The Crew of 5 consisted of two military buddies, their spouses, and him. He was single and twice divorced. None had kids still at home or even close by. Several years ago they all went together and bought an old farm in eastern Tennessee. They got together several times a year there and after many late night discussions had decided it was a prudent idea to start planning for a brave new world, a new world with a very rough beginning.

The decision was made early and getting out of town was easy. No crowds and no check points. He was now two hundred miles down the road, off the Interstate and Highways and had 50 miles to go on county roads. The crew should start arriving tonight and over the next couple of days. He listened to the radio as he drove. The radio was full of people talking about New York, talking about who could have done this, talking about a failed US foreign policy, talking about war in the Middle East, Asia, and Eastern Europe. The President has just declared Marshall Law and has asked all citizens to remain calm and in their homes. Reservists and National Guards are being called up. Reports of widespread rioting were coming in. Food stores, liquor stores, gun shops, and gas stations are experiencing looting. People are killing each other.

As he rolled down a steep grade the truck unexpectedly sputtered a bit but kept running. He thought he saw a bright flash of light but was not sure. The radio instantly filled with static and he couldn’t find anything but more static, on AM or FM. As he drove up the next hill, in the rear view mirror, he noticed a strange large cloud building up. It rose quickly and he slowly recognized what he had only seen in old films and sci-fi movies, a mushroom cloud, A Nuclear Detonation.

He pulls the camper truck over and gets out. He stares back at the mushroom cloud and slowly asks, “Where is that”? “Who got hit”? Slowly he realized that Atlanta Georgia is no more and said a short prayer that came together one word at a time and ended with “amen” repeated five times. Time had stopped and he stood there frozen. His mind raced. He heard a sound, not very loud, like a boom, or lightning, or something. Then the leaves rustled with a gust of wind and then quieted down again.

He got back into the truck and realized that the light he thought he saw was the detonation, the sputter in his trucks engine and static on the radio was the EMP. The sound was what was left of the blast and the sudden breeze was the wave passing by. He mentally reviewed everything he knew about nuclear bombs and asked, “What’s next”?  The answer was fallout and he realized he needed to get going.

He got into the truck, turned the ignition key, and nothing happened. No lights. No static filled radio. Dead.

A series of questions ran thru his mind.

OK! Let’s stop our story here and discuss this situation with a few Q’s and A’s.

Question: “Where is the fallout going to go”? Answer: “Where the wind blows”.

Question: “What was the weather babe saying on tv this morning”? Answer: “A low. A low was moving thru the Atlanta area and traveling towards the northeast”.

Our subject realized that he is north east of Atlanta, about a hundred miles as the crow flies.

Question: “And the winds were what”? Answer: “Surface winds were 5 to 10 miles per hour, but what are the winds up there where the fireball is”? Answer: I do not know.

Question: “What should I do”?  Answer: If the low is moving northeast so is that fireball and the fallout that will come out of it as it cools off. The winds may also have different directions and speeds at different elevations. Most likely it will be moving at a faster speed then the surface winds. You need to find some protection.

Note: In the old days the National Weather Service provided information that averaged out the speed and direction of those upper level winds that allowed us to roughly predict where and when the fallout would arrive, it was called a RAWIN Report. I don’t believe that info is gathered or made available any more.

Now back to our story.

He gets out of the truck and begins to push. In a few moments he is again on a downgrade and gravity takes over. He jumps in and just before he gets to the bottom and out of speed he pulls in to a dirt lane, into some farmers field, coming to a stop behind some trees. The truck finally stops rolling. It is the end of the road for the truck.

Slowly he gets out of the truck and surveys the site. He walks back and climbs into the camper only to come out a few minutes later with a G.I. issue, fold up spade. He unfolds it as he walks to the front of the truck and then starts digging. Never in his wildest, after leaving the service 20 years before, did he ever think he would be digging a foxhole again. He dug for a while, took a break, drank some water, and then started digging again. He dug a foxhole with a sitting bench big enough for two men. As he dug he took the excavated soil and put it in four piles. The ones on the left and right were bigger then the other two. The sun was starting to set when he finished.

He again climbed into the camper. This time he took everything out of the cabinets and stacked it equally over the floor. He was glad that he had all of these cans and jars of food and cases of water. They were denser then the dehydrated and freeze-dried provisions he had stocked up on at his bug out location.  They would provide some shielding.

He strapped on a 40 cal, semi auto, Smith and Wesson with 6 magazines, selected a few MRE’s, a half dozen bottles of water, a small LED flashlight, an AR with 5 magazines, a emergency radio, and a rain poncho, and then exited the camper.  After placing the items, other then the S & W, in the foxhole he pushed the truck forward a few more feet. The truck was a king cab and the foxhole was directly under the back seats.

He opened the doors and began to fill the back of the cab with soil excavated from the foxhole. When it was about 2 feet high, on the floor and the seat, he stopped and filled the front seat and floor, again, about two feet deep.  The rest of the soil he banked up around and under the trucks body. Filling in the space between the trucks body and the ground. The exception was about a two-foot wide area directly in front of the truck. Here he took a blue work shirt. Tied the arms thru the trucks grill so that 6 inches of the long shirttail lay on the ground. This was his exit and entrance.

It was dark as he crawled under the truck, covered the shirttail with soil so it stay put and slid into his foxhole. He ate a little bit of some MRE crackers and cheese, drank some water and fell a sleep.  Right after midnight he took the Mil Issue poncho and covered up with it. Glad he had a liner on it. Glad it was spring and not winter.

Morning came and he waited as long as he could before looking out. After blinking his eyes in the sunlight a few times he saw “stuff” had fallen out of the sky. It looked like a gray ash and also small gray particles. He realized that over night the fallout had arrived.

Keeping the poncho on he slid out from under the truck. He quickly climbed into the camper, started a pot of coffee on the propane cook stove and then got out and went off a ways to take care of several body functions. Before crawling back under the truck he shook off the poncho, re-entered the camper, shut off the fire, grabbed the pot of percolating coffee and a canteen cup. Back under the camper he drank coffee and nibbled something from a MRE, he thought about everything he had been taught about surviving on a nuclear battlefield. He thought about what Atlanta use to be like, his friends, and his former life. He thought about the retreat and the welfare of the Crew of 5.

He remembered that radiation from a nuclear detonation dropped off at a regular rate but he couldn’t remember what that rate was. Since he had no way to measure the current level of radioactivity he figured it really didn’t matter too much anyway. He guessed that he would have to stay where he was for 5 or 6 days just to be safe.

Time out boys and girls.

Here is what the guy in our story couldn’t remember. It’s called the 7-hour rule.

At 7 hours after detonation the fission product activity will have decreased to about 1/10, or 10%, of its amount at 1 hour. At about 2 days, or 49 hours, the activity will have decreased to 1% of the 1-hour value!  For example, a 500 rad level can drop to 50R in 7 hours and down to 5R after 2 days (49 hours). In other words, if you have shelter with good shielding and stay put for even just 7 hours you have really increased your chances of survival.

OK, class over and back to our story, which is already in progress…

For the next 5 days he stayed under the truck, going out each morning for about 10 minutes to take care of bodily functions, brew a pot of coffee and grabbing a can of fruit or whatever from the camper. During the day he urinated in empty water bottles and disposed of them the next morning. He tried to sleep as much as possible. Sleep was not easy and never lasted long.

On the 4th day he found a signal on the emergency radio. Broadcasting from Chattanooga the news was limited and what there was was not good. Nuke strikes on Savannah, Jacksonville and Charleston. Rumors of more destruction northward up the seaboard. No news from the west. The fed government was stuck in some hole in the ground in West Virginia and pretended they were in control of something

When day 7 arrived he decided it was time to move out. After his morning ritual he repacked his bug out bag with items from the camper, thru the poncho over it all, shouldered his AR, and headed down the road. He had not seen or heard another human being for 6 days and figured the road would be the easiest and fastest way to get to his bug out location. He hoped whoever came upon his truck would be good people and appreciate the supplies he left behind despite the dirt he had thrown on top.

As he started walking he thought about how good it felt after sitting in a foxhole for a week. And the sun on his face only made it better.

Here is how this chapter in our story ends: Our hero makes it to the retreat, on foot and in 4 more days. Other then dead livestock and wildlife he saw no one and heard no one the entire way. On day 3 he started throwing up, only keeping down water and a few MRE crackers. But he made it. His crew was there. They stripped him down, ran him thru a quick decon, then brought him in and put him to bed. He slept for 22 hours. When he woke up he ate chicken flavored ramen and learned the Crew of 5 was now 4. One of his buddies didn’t make it but his spouse did. Then he slept again.

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Comments

  1. patientmomma says:

    Excellent teaching story; thank you for writing it. More and more I think I will get one of those collapsible bikes to keep with me.

  2. Ron G.,
    I enjoy reading and learning from these types of stories. Is this part of a series and is the full version of this available somewhere?

  3. Petticoat Prepper says:

    Oh, great start! Hope there’s more to come. Found myself thinking of Jericho and trying to remember about the fall out.

  4. I was thinking of Jericho too. Very interesting reading, Ron G. It got some ideas into my head. Hope there’s more of this.

  5. Urbancitygirl says:

    Very good story. Easy to read and too quick to end. Would love to have more.

  6. This could be the start of a novel.

  7. axelsteve says:

    If I was I think Jerico was spared the radiation cause of the prevailing winds and distance from the blast.

  8. Tactical G-Ma says:

    Ron G
    You have a real talent for making words come to life. One must be prepared in these perilous times.

    Good job.

  9. LongWinter says:

    Well told story. Raises some questions for me, as I have to travel far to reach family.

  10. Well done! Thank you for sharing your craft with us! Keep going!

  11. DB Prepper says:

    Great read, thank you Ron G!

  12. Donna in MN says:

    As I had mentioned before laboratory tests had been done with EMPs and there is no stopping a truck because it acts like it’s own faraday cage. So I will assume the truck had mechanical difficulties.

    Quick thinking like what an Airman’s Nuclear bomb survival guide I read years ago. I would not have stepped outside the homemade bunker to whiz. I would have dug a narrow deep hole within the fox hole to dump the waste, and cover it up a little each time, rather than expose myself outside.That is, if I wanted to still have kids. Other than that, good reaction there.

    As I was reading the story and he saw the bomb in the rear mirror, I was already anticipating the guy to find a steep hill in the woods or a burried culvert nearby and start digging for a bunker, but he said he was in a farmers field— he used inginuity in turning the truck into an effective bunker.

    • Donna, I know the data is still not in on EMP and vehicles but I needed a reason to keep our character from just driving on to the BOL.

    • jamullins says:

      since 1996 or so most land vehicles have incorporated more and more solid state electronics into their systems that they are quite susceptible to EMP.

      The idea of a ground based blast in New York sity poses several questions about the ability of terrain to impede the expansion of the EMP effect from the initial site of the blast.

      For the truck to be its own farady cage you would want to remove the antenna, disconnect the battery, disconnect the wiring harness, and run a chain or two to the ground to ground out the electrical and magnetic build up. If the truck is close enough to the blast not much would save the systems from the EMP wave.

      It was noted in the mid 20th that even gas engine ignition systems could cause an EMP that would interfere with radio and television transmissions, there were laws passed requiring that manufacturers use interference suppressors as SOP on these items.

      Strong EMP effects set buildings on fire in the immediate area of the explosions over Hiroshima and Nagasaki as well due to high electrical voltage and currents induced by the EMP.

      Simply continuing on down the road away from the blast is a better choice if the truck would’ve kept going. But, since it died, the character chose to bunker up. Knowing the wind conditions according the national weather service aren’t crucial really close to the blast immediately afterwards the detonation. The blast itself will upset wind currents for some time due to changes in atmospheric pressure caused by the blast, the amount of fallout, heat from the fires in the city, and so on. It is possible for the blast to toss out larger particulates for 50 to 100 miles.

      • EMP is not capable of igniting structural fires. The intense heat from the fireball does that.
        EMP can not bend over the curvature of the earth or go down the far side of mountains.
        EMP is not electricity. It is often compared to a lightning strike in the sense that metal antennas, wiring, etc. will act as a collector and the EMP will run down the length of said wire/metal in search of ground. Grounding a vehicle will guarantee its future uselessness.
        The initial outward blast will totally over ride local surface winds however, the return blast will negate the first. Upper atmosphere winds will not be disrupted by a ground strike. The rising fire ball will enter and eventually be guided by the upper level winds.
        Fallout over the target area is irrelevant as few if any will still be alive to worry about it.

        • jamullins says:

          EMP is capable of cause energy, mostly thermal and electrical, build up with significant voltage, enough to turn railroad track and car antennas into a mechanism to relay this energy into a medium such as plastic or wood that can ignite. The intense heat from a fireball is not the only mechanism that stats fires with a nuclear blast. massive atmospheric static, high speed friction, intense atmospheric compression, and debris collision also contribute to the fires caused by a nuclear explosion, especially fires outside the blast shadow of the fireball.

          electrical discharge is intense, capable of entry and exit wounds in human flesh, and has been used to create explosions . the development of high energy explosives has been a research topic since the first use of the bomb. electromagnetic wavelengths of divergent polarities can cause intense magnetic repulsion that has been theorized as a mechanism to create an explosion as well.

          • That’s all fine and dandy but it is also outside what is generated by a nuclear explosion.

            • jamullins says:

              wow. nice last word. want me to start another thread so we can argue about something else you only read about on wikipedia?

  13. Well done! I am ready to read more about it! As I live fairly close to Atlanta this is one thing that I do not think that I could prepare for as I am too close.

  14. Thank you for the story, am sitting here wondering if I would have enough sense to put my truck over the hole (could I even move the truck other than down a slope…could I work it with a slope…not so much in the flat desert. I really enjoy stories that cause me (us) to think as mental prep is every bit as important as physical prep- maybe even more so!

  15. Just Brad says:

    Very good story, is there more to come?

  16. Joe Mitchell says:

    Wouldn’t the food and water in the truck be radioactive and dangerous to consume? Wonder how long you would have to wait before you could pick up items like food, guns, ammo?

    • The outside of the containers might be contaminated with fallout particles which he would have to remove, but the food inside would be fine. Radiation is used to sterilize some food products- it just passes through and goes its merry way.

    • Chuck Findlay says:

      I’m not an expert by any means, but I did have to sit through a lot of boring training films and meetings relating to working with and around radiation when I worked at a nuke plant for a few years and the neutron radiation is the most dangerous and also very short lived. Radioactive dust on things will settle down and while it is far from safe, you can remove it and items in a box would be safe. The same thing with water, let it settle and don’t stir it up and it should be OK if you take water off the top and not the bottom of a source of water.

      If anyone at the plant dropped a tool (actually anything) and it slipped through the grating on the walkways to the concrete floor below, you no longer owned said item as it was now covered with dust that never gets touched.

      .

  17. DAS030994 says:

    Very nice story and some useful information. I hope this is the beginning of a series.

  18. Information on this and other improvised fallout shelters is available in Cresson Kearny’s book, Nuclear War Survival Skills, which is in the public domain and can be found for free download on the internet.

  19. Good info, good read. Gave me lots to think about even though we are not planning on bugging out. We will hunker down and planning some type of fall out area should be easy to plan with a little bit of thought.
    I’d like to see this as chapter one in a book!

  20. riverrider says:

    agree with donna. that said, we were taught to dig the hole enough to get in,put the dirt in the truck, move the truck over the hole, and continue digging, using the dirt to fill the gaps. but really your best bet would likely be (dependent on conditions not stated) to keep hauling a$$. distance equals time equals lower dose rate. the half life of fallout is nominally measured in hours/days so the further away you get equals less material plus the longer past T equals lower rads, or centagrey or whatever they call it now. then again, i get the feeling RON knows more than he lets on :)

  21. riverrider says:

    this also points out the weakness in your water plan if you are betting on river/pond/lake water. or rain of the first fall for that matter.

  22. riverrider says:

    after a semester of “war and peace in the nuclear age” our professor says write a paper on what we would do if we got the “20 minute warning”. mine was one line…..”go down to 7/11, buy a six pack, watch the pretty light show.” the end…..i got an A.

    • Joe,
      Penrod is correct. Wash off the contamination on the outside and there is no danger from the food. Also the contamination on the container will decay at the same rate as described in the story.

      • Thanks, Ron.

        There is more in this article in the New York Times:

        “Suppose the unthinkable happened, and terrorists struck New York or another big city with an atom bomb. What should people there do? The government has a surprising new message: Do not flee. Get inside any stable building …

        Even staying in a car, the studies show, would reduce casualties by more than 50 percent; hunkering down in a basement would be better by far.

        …The big surprise was how taking shelter for as little as several hours made a huge difference in survival rates.
        Even just staying in your car could save hundreds of thousands of lives.

        If people in Los Angeles a mile or more from ground zero of an attack took no shelter, Mr. Buddemeier said, there would be 285,000 casualties from fallout in that region.

        Taking shelter in a place with minimal protection, like a car, would cut that figure to 125,000 deaths or injuries, he said. A shallow basement would further reduce it to 45,000 casualties. And the core of a big office building or an underground garage would provide the best shelter of all. ”

        That’s inside a car, not under a truck full of dirt. A poncho is better than nothing, because it keeps the radioactive particles off you.

        More here: http://www.nytimes.com/2010/12/16/science/16terror.html?_r=0

        • Depending on the size of the weapon and if it were a surface or an air burst, a mile or two is way to close. Maybe 5 to 10 miles for a surface and 10 to 20 for an air.
          For those that don’t know, an air burst is when the fireball does not touch the surface of the earth or suck debris into it. The result is a larger area of destruction and little fallout.
          I’ll read the article but I doubt it will reveal the methodology he used to come up with his numbers.

  23. Bwhntr59 says:

    Clearly this scenario calls for the person to have personal radiation detector. I have the GMC-300, about 160.00 bucks. Scarcely bigger than a pack of cigarettes. I also just bought an attachment for an iPad ( or can work with an iphone or iPod ) that works with an app called Geiger lite. It displays on the device in questions and gives off a plethora of radiation measuring info. Cost is 92.00. Even if we don’t get nuked in the sense of bombs/missiles if you live within 100 miles of a nuke plant it makes sense to have some ability to measure radiation. An accident at these plants it almost sure to happen sooner or later ( note Chernobyl and Fukishima ). But this was a very good realistic scenario.

  24. Maggie Harris says:

    For the unprepared, such as myself, this was terrifying and yet so informative! The fastest thing that I have read in years!! More please?

  25. Maggie Harris says:

    I’m curious…are there no such things as emergency shelters built like pop up tents, that could keep radioactive materials off of an individual and lessen the chance of sickness and death? If so, wouldn’t this be something that would be part of every persons bug out(or sheltering in place) supplies?

    • Sorry Maggie but the answer is no.
      Distance, Time and Mass are what we have to work with.
      While anything that keeps the fallout from getting on us is good for decontamination reasons it is the radioactivity in the fallout particles that we need to be concerned with.
      Distance and Time: The further you are from the point of origin, called ground zero, the longer it will take the fallout cloud to get to your location, if it does. The longer it takes the less radioactivity will be present. The 7 hour rule is already in effect.
      Mass, or Density, is what will protect you from what arrives at your location.

    • Tomthetinker says:

      Maggie: I worked in Nuclear construction for a number of years. Enrico Fermi Unit ll and Davis Besse Unit l, construction, refueling and refits. Each time you sign on for any event at these places you must attend a 5 day set of classes .. and pass the exams.

      Time, distance, shielding .. TDS is the end line of safety around the “Zoomies” .. Rad contamination.

      Spend as little time exposed … With the greatest amount of distance from it … with the greatest amount of shielding you can aquire ..

      • Tactical G-Ma says:

        TTT
        Several of my family members spent years in Nuclear power fabrication and inspection. Whenever there was a problem at a plant, people would be called in from all over the world to work sometimes for only a few minutes. Once the rad exposure limit was reached, the tech couldn’t go back in for a period of time, sometimes a year.

      • recoveringidiot says:

        TTT, I “get” to service equipment inside nuclear plants so I am required to do all the yearly requalifications as well. After all that training it seems to me that inhaled or ingested hot particles would do more long term damage than the short exposure from the pulse if its some distance away?
        And the poster used Rads as a measurement and if I remember right 50rad is a serious dose. You would think I would remember more but I don’t go in any of the hot parts of the plants and get away asap after the job is done. There used to be a plant HP (radiation control guy) that posted here some time back, wish he were here to fill in the gaps on this question.

        • Tomthetinker says:

          Rems Rems Rems …. Funny story time! Tac GMa, Recovering….. Picture this.

          You are standing outside the ‘Man airlock’ of Davis Bessie’s reactor. A long enameled and tiled hallway leads off to a series of clean spot exits into stairways, Health Physics labs and the Man Elevator. Rad detectors are high and low all along the walls at every intersection … and the hall is lined with men and women alllll suited and taped up in anti-C suits waiting to get cleared through the airlock.

          Meanwhile inside the reactor near the “Hot Well” tunnel, a crew of laborers (2 men) have been sent to mop up a small pool of clear liquid. This is during a unit refueling and a number of area rad detectors are off line for replacement etc…. yepper.. they do that. I digress…

          With all required permits, PP&E, Our boys mop up the ‘liquid’ and put everything back on the cart and head off to the elevator to leave the reactor. (remember… time, distance, shielding) Their ‘time’ is up! At no time do the (now former) Health Physics monitors do or say anything regarding dose or exposure times on the permits. While passing the first lower level of the reactor, above the hot well level,.. in the elevator.. the local rad alarms outside the elevator start to alarm. Our boys and the elevator operator … kindly put … Freaking Panic!

          We out in the hall way can hear the alarms over the airlock operators phone and our own radios. I see that I am not the only poor schmuck with raised eyebrows looking down the hall toward the airlock… and then back at the elevator door .. the stairway door .. the fuel pool hall….

          Our boys with the wet mops and buckets have reached the reactor floor level and exit the elevator. At this moment.. and I mean this in literal definition … TS-HAS-HTF… and now ‘it’ (the S in SHTF) is running for the airlock to escape. Note: A rad alarm in the plant is a .. bad thing. ANY alarm on the reactor floor or surrounding areas, in operation or during shut down or refueling, sets off the Health Physics boys and the entry point alarms …. and locks down every.. single.. lock.. on every.. single door … inside the plant fence…. All the while now, some very serious boys and girls with some very effective light weapons are taking positions at places I never thought I’d seem a man with a real automatic weapon. In training you are admonished to basically .. stand still.. shut up.. wait… for someone else to open the door you may really really really wanna get out of. Now comes the screw up………

          Our boys have reached the airlock and the health physics temp. inside… allows.. our boys inside the airlock thinking they are simply making an escape… this violates NRC and Security policy… or any rational thought process, but he .. (was) .. a temp. The airlock door is closed and the airlock alarm goes off… and the alarms .. outside the airlock .. shift to HOLLYS- -T mode. We in the hall way are totally quiet.. it was amazing. We have NO place to go. No exit that will open without a man with the key.. and a gun.. and a permit. Are ya having fun Packers? I am certain now that I should not have had the Ice Tea or the mac salad with my lunch.

          In short…. the outter airlock door opens and our boys with the wet mops and buckets.. followed by the elevator operator.. come screaming out and start to hop and skip down the hall while tearing off their anti-contamination suits. (que Laugh track)

          Now the entire hall is ‘crapped up’. So are our boys. So are we. So is the airlock. So are the mops .. and buckets .. and cart.. and……

          We waited for just under 4 hours for Health Physics to set up a decon area outside the hall. That is when I learned the importance of wearing the disposable paper undies Detorit Edison supplies.. offers actually.. anyone who enters in a C-suit.. and why one never.. never carries anything they value or are unwilling to deposit in a rad-waste dump. I also learned that I can hold my water for well over four hours but not when I sink my feet into warm soapy water after 4 hours of holding my water. Strip by the numbers. step into the wadding pool and accept the shower. Move on to the next… yadayada.

          Exposure rate for this incident was less than 20 mili-rems. The cost of clean up, lost man hours….. all due to about a couple of ‘cups’ of hot well condensate on the floor…….. Sorry… Stream of thought.

          ask me about the guy who tried to get through Security after a morning shower with Comfort Inn gel…

          • Tomthetinker says:

            Read that as Toledo Edison / First Energy.. not Detroit.

          • recoveringidiot says:

            TTT, I have the most fun getting my tools and test equipment through security and into the protected area. Most folks don’t realize that the security boys and girls at these facilities absolutely own you when you are in that area. And yes they all carry M4′s and pistols. I hate it for the folks in the line behind me. I have spent the afternoon just getting back my nylon tool bag one day, seems nylon loves to hang on to one of the short half-life gasses, ended up with a HP supervisor telling the SAM operator to just set me aside for an hour then retesting. None of this makes a uneducated redneck tech feel real good. I’m working on getting another territory with no plants and it can’t happen too soon.

      • Chuck Findlay says:

        Never worked at Fermi, but I did at Besse. In fact I camp close to it several times each summer, well within sighting range.

        • recoveringidiot says:

          I think Besse has one of the “incident” report example of what not to do in that annual re qualification tests at the plant where I have to go every year. I think it was boron corrosion near the control rods? I really need to pay more attention as I’m in these places when they are refueling and from what I understand they have the most “incidents” when refueling.

  26. Thanks everyone for the positive feedback. Sorry, but I don’t think I have a book inside my head. Maybe a few more short stories at best.

  27. Tactical G-Ma says:

    Ron
    Won’t contamination also depend upon the halflife of the radioactive material? I heard that a direct hit from a dirty bomb using medical grade radioisotope will be clean in 2 days.

    • Tactical G-Ma
      A dirty bomb is totally different in that it does not create the fission byproducts we call radioactive fallout. This is because the explosion is caused by regular high explosives,
      The nuclear material is basically the shrapnel spread by the explosion. The half life and decay rate will be determined by what nuclear material was used.
      Fallout is made radioactive by particle exchanges that occurs inside the fireball of a nuclear explosion and the decay rate is always going to be the same and relatively short.

  28. babycatcher says:

    wow. That was great! I never would have thought to use the truck as a shelter….i have to download that book now. I don’t know anything about nuclear stuff, as that’s my hubby’s forte. Guess I better get cracking’…..

  29. I didn’t know about the 7 hour rule! That was fun to read and educational! THanks! Keep it up!

  30. suburban housewife says:

    Ron –
    Ok – so not a book – but please – many, many more short stories! What a great learning tool – will remember that story a lot longer than reading a list of to do’s, that is for sure!

    I just went to a presentation on EMP and learned that LED lights will probably fry because they contain circuitry, as will those CF-something light bulbs. Picked up a few “old fashioned” flashlights yesterday.

    You probably already know this but disconnecting the battery in your vehicle and then reconnecting it will cause all the computers to reboot and the vehicle has a good chance of re-starting then.

    I really enjoyed the story and lesson. thanks.

    • axelsteve says:

      After you disconnect your battery you need to let the vehicle idle before driving.That way the computer reboots and reprograms its self. You do this anytime you disconnect a battery in a newer vehicle, or for a routine replacement of the battery.You will also lose your radio presets unless you write them down.

  31. If I remember right Alpha and Beta particles will not penetrate thick clothing and a dirt cover as in the story. You must try and keep the dust out of your ears,noise and eyes. Gamma from the blast will hurt you if you are not sheltered. As far away as our person was from the blast I don’t think it would effect him. You should carry ear plug and several masks to prevent breathing dust. A good poncho is OK for a cover . (That was the Army’s way) also a 8X10 tarp would come in handy. You must be able to DE-contaminate after being exposed. It’s been a long time sense my training. All of you should buy a copy of “Nuclear War Survival Skills” Money well spent and all the info you will need in the event of a Nuclear event. Remember it could happen at any time as we are living in a very dangerous times.
    The G-man

  32. Ron, GREAT JOB !!!

  33. I grew up literally under the old Nike missile radar domes in the suburbs of New York, back then we would do the drills in school, but we new that we were too close to target#1, and we were toast. Now my concerns are not of outright attack to several cities, but an attack on one city, by a dirty/chemical/biological weapon, and then attacks on our power grid and/or water supply, that would cripple us as bad as an outright full scale missle attack, without the reprisal attacks.

    • Yeah, we did the drills in school too. Get under your desk facing away from the windows and put your hands over your head/neck……
      Right ,, like that would do anything for protection if a bomd landed in Manhattan!

      • Chuck Findlay says:

        Anyone not wearing 3,000,000 sunblock is going to have a really bad day – Sara Connor

  34. Brearbear says:

    Good story Ron G!

    Some thoughts and ideas…

    …Even looking in rear view mirror their is a huge chance of short term or permanent blindness when looking at the flash…i think?

    One major thing the protagonist was missing…

    “Plan “B” for anyone caught without Potassium Iodide (KI) tablets in a nuclear emergency…”
    http://www.ki4u.com/plan_b.htm

    (i even read somewhere of applying/feeding (KI) to your pets and livestock)…the idea is basically to start doing/using it BEFORE the radiation sets in…

    One other thing would be a rain water trench and keeping a huge tarp and draping over your truck/expedient fallout shelter…(help keep out fallout dust and possibly rain/snow/wind). And wearing /having expedient/temporary clothing/mask(s) etc. Especially for when leaving your shelter protection even for a few minutes…have lots of disposable’s. A few soft hand size brooms for dusting…(you can make your own expedient cover alls with scissors/knife…heavy guage plastic/construction grade caulking glue and might even use truck tires twine duct tape for booties)?

    I sure would not want to be caught in a situation where i had to stay in an expedient foxhole truck
    Type shelter…(limited space).
    …i have though seen a similiar vehicle type shelter like this where a trench is dug out then drive over the trench…(more room). Also a door/plywood/pole type trench shelter could be added to this initial design if you had no choice but to shelter in place…had more time. You could also initially start with a foxhole and dig from within if you had to?

    Bugging out with a cheap old ten speed even and a yak trailor would maybe help you get to retreat faster? (if vehicle fails)…

    Of course there is also the tools: big and smallprybars/spade-square shovel/rake/pickaxe/maul/handsaw/bowsawetc….(i keep these in my truck for example)…

    If anyone missed it and is interested i did a few short comments recently:
    http://www.thesurvivalistblog.net/raising-chickens-for-eggs/

    I highly suggest everyone reads….the free e-book: Nuclear War Survival Skills by Cresson Kearney…
    Buy the book or print a hard copy!
    *Ch. 16: Minimum Pre-Crisis Preparations

    Also read the ki4u.com Website:
    http://www.ki4u.com/main.htm

    The Good News About Nuclear Destruction!
    http://www.ki4u.com/goodnews.htm

    What To Do If A Nuclear Disaster Is Imminent!
    http://www.ki4u.com/guide.htm

    When An ill Wind Blows From Afar! (Like From Japan Fukushima Nuclear Crisis)
    http://www.ki4u.com/illwind.htm

    Also:http://www.survivalring.org/shelters/fallout-on-the-farm/

    I challenge the pack to check these sites as a basic start. There is so much to learn!

    *I highly recomend pre-building a couple (K.A.P.)-homemade Kearney Air Pumps…and read about
    Shelter ventilation dangers!

    **Also can build a homemade (K.F.M)-Kearney Fallout Meter…
    Better yet buy a geiger counter and a dosimeter.

    ***i have been playing with some ideas that Kearney started…
    Premaking an arch…
    Possibly using culvert…or cutting a larger culvert in half that fits into a plywood base over a trench?…using rebar?…
    Keeping a few pressure treated sheets of construction floor grade plywood and post and beam for a roof?…
    And using short sections of culvert snaking/elbows for entrance and emergency exit holes…?

    Pre making things now and experimenting while you can…

    I have a big interest in this issue…but am no expert…my only hope is that WE can all learn and teach each other!

    Hope this helps.

    • Brearbear, Yes staring at the fireball, at the first few moments of it’s creation, can cause temporary or even permanent blindness. Depending on the distance of course. Most likely a greater distance at night. Our story character never saw the fireball, only the rising mushroom cloud.

  35. Tactical G-Ma says:

    Brearbear
    I recently purchased wet and dry protective suits complete with booties, gloves, and swim goggles. Throw in a few N95 masks, some duct tape, and a box of swiffer dusters. Definitely are going into the ghb. If walking I would also cover all that with my emergency blanket. I don’t know the science but figure something is better than nothing.
    In this scenario, I would definitely like having those along. I never thought of using my vehicle to build a bunker.
    But wouldn’t it be better to throw your gear up under the crankcase and expose yourself to the elements as little as possible?
    Another question – what if you are in your trench and it begins to rain. Will the rain wash contaminated particles into the trench? They will have decreased in rads as before mentioned but where does one go then?

    • Brearbear says:

      Hi Tactical G-Ma!.

      Suggest checking this out in book:

      App. A-(1 to 6)… Instructions for Six Expedient Fallout Shelters

      http://www.oism.org/nwss/s73p930.htm:

      Ch. 5: Shelter, the Greatest Need

      http://www.oism.org/nwss/s73p916.htm

      Q.1. “But wouldn’t it be better to throw your gear up under the crankcase and expose yourself to the elements as little as possible?”.

      “For good protection he must be protected overhead and on all sides by barrier shielding.”

      Be it earth/concrete/lead/water/snow-ice…any barrier you can find and make do with. A trench/foxhole gives you shielding except for the sky shine.*see book. “An open trench gives poor protection”.

      Q.2. “what if you are in your trench and it begins to rain. Will the rain wash contaminated particles into the trench?”.

      Yes…It would be a good idea to use a HUGE tarp and rope at the very first stage of expedient fallout shelter building.
      Tarp a huge area over…above and beyond the area you will be working…can also make a “tent” with it. Making things fairly well sealed and (Keeping your work area dry).

      Keeping this big tarp up for the long term would also help give redundancy to the other weather/water proofing measures to be taken when building and would help keep fallout away. (Also some shade…plus some extra space other than the fallout shelter itself)?
      Then make a “gutter”/trench to collect any water and direct it away.

      And then…
      …essentially you are needing to dig a rainproof dugout/trench…
      …some kind of “roof”…(poles/doors)…entrance…(sandbags/earth bags)…
      Followed by a layer of plastic…followed by mounding earth (sheilding)…making an earth arch.(see book…).

      Some of the more simpler (E.F.S.)-Expedient Fallout Shelters…
      use logs/doors/plywood…
      and in my last post i suggested a length of culvert cut in half and made to fit into a wood frame that fits over and that is wider than the trench…followed with plastic then mound earth and then make trench for rain. (or some kind of arched roof).

      Maybe even somehow…curved/bent rebar with long/strait pieces… tied with wire and chicken wire/plastic then berm?

      The foxhole/trench/truck shelter idea would have to be VERY temporary…such as the character used it…until…somehow you could get to a larger fallout shelter.

      ALSO remember:
      “In warm or hot weather, shelters. especially crowded ones, must be well ventilated and cooled by an adequate volume of outdoor air pumped through them.”
      AND:
      “Turns in passageways are very effective in reducing the amount of radiation entering a shelter through them. A right-angle turn, either from a vertical or horizontal entry, causes a reduction of about90%.”

      Q.3. They will have decreased in rads as before mentioned but where does one go then?”.

      “Whenever practical, expedient shelters should be built so that they can be readily enlarged to make semi-permanent living quarters. After it becomes safe to emerge for limited periods, occupants could sleep and spend much of their waking time in such a rainproof dugout that affords excellent protection against continuing radiation.”

      Sheltering in place preferably IN your fortified/fallout protected home where you have all your preps is ideal…AND…
      having a vehicle loaded up with the basics for when not at home or not able to get home
      and making do with where you are…or preferably…getting to a retreat?

      One last thing…

      Winter…?
      “Building is difficult if heavy rain or snow is falling or if the ground is deeply frozen. (However, untrained Americans have built good fallout shelters with shielding provided by 5 or more feet of packed snow,11 including a winter version of the Crib-Walled Pole Shelter described in Appendix A. The practicality of several Russian designs of snow-covered expedient shelters also has been demonstrated by winter construction tests in Colorado”.

      Hope this helps?

  36. Brearbear says:

    Hi Tactical G-Ma!.

    Suggest checking this out in book:

    App. A-(1 to 6)… Instructions for Six Expedient Fallout Shelters

    http://www.oism.org/nwss/s73p930.htm:

    Ch. 5: Shelter, the Greatest Need

    http://www.oism.org/nwss/s73p916.htm

    Q.1. “But wouldn’t it be better to throw your gear up under the crankcase and expose yourself to the elements as little as possible?”.

    “For good protection he must be protected overhead and on all sides by barrier shielding.”

    Be it earth/concrete/lead/water/snow-ice…any barrier you can find and make do with. A trench/foxhole gives you shielding except for the sky shine.*see book. “An open trench gives poor protection”.

    Q.2. “what if you are in your trench and it begins to rain. Will the rain wash contaminated particles into the trench?”.

    Yes…It would be a good idea to use a HUGE tarp and rope at the very first stage of expedient fallout shelter building.
    Tarp a huge area over…above and beyond the area you will be working…can also make a “tent” with it. Making things fairly well sealed and (Keeping your work area dry).

    Keeping this big tarp up for the long term would also help give redundancy to the other weather/water proofing measures to be taken when building and would help keep fallout away. (Also some shade…plus some extra space other than the fallout shelter itself)?
    Then make a “gutter”/trench to collect any water and direct it away.

    And then…
    …essentially you are needing to dig a rainproof dugout/trench…
    …some kind of “roof”…(poles/doors)…entrance…(sandbags/earth bags)…
    Followed by a layer of plastic…followed by mounding earth (sheilding)…making an earth arch.(see book…).

    Some of the more simpler (E.F.S.)-Expedient Fallout Shelters…
    use logs/doors/plywood…
    and in my last post i suggested a length of culvert cut in half and made to fit into a wood frame that fits over and that is wider than the trench…followed with plastic then mound earth and then make trench for rain. (or some kind of arched roof).

    Maybe even somehow…curved/bent rebar with long/strait pieces… tied with wire and chicken wire/plastic then berm?

    The foxhole/trench/truck shelter idea would have to be VERY temporary…such as the character used it…until…somehow you could get to a larger fallout shelter.
    ALSO remember:
    “In warm or hot weather, shelters. especially crowded ones, must be well ventilated and cooled by an adequate volume of outdoor air pumped through them.”
    AND:
    “Turns in passageways are very effective in reducing the amount of radiation entering a shelter through them. A right-angle turn, either from a vertical or horizontal entry, causes a reduction of about90%.”

    Q.3. They will have decreased in rads as before mentioned but where does one go then?”.

    “Whenever practical, expedient shelters should be built so that they can be readily enlarged to make semi-permanent living quarters. After it becomes safe to emerge for limited periods, occupants could sleep and spend much of their waking time in such a rainproof dugout that affords excellent protection against continuing radiation.”

    Sheltering in place preferably IN your fortified/fallout protected home where you have all your preps is ideal…AND…
    having a vehicle loaded up with the basics for when not at home or not able to get home
    and making do with where you are…or preferably…getting to a retreat?

    One last thing…

    Winter…?
    “Building is difficult if heavy rain or snow is falling or if the ground is deeply frozen. (However, untrained Americans have built good fallout shelters with shielding provided by 5 or more feet of packed snow,11 including a winter version of the Crib-Walled Pole Shelter described in Appendix A. The practicality of several Russian designs of snow-covered expedient shelters also has been demonstrated by winter construction tests in Colorado”.

    Hope this helps?

  37. Brearbear says:

    Hi Tactical G-Ma!.

    Suggest checking this out in book:

    App. A-(1 to 6)… Instructions for Six Expedient Fallout Shelters

    http://www.oism.org/nwss/s73p930.htm:

    Ch. 5: Shelter, the Greatest Need

    http://www.oism.org/nwss/s73p916.htm

    Q.1. “But wouldn’t it be better to throw your gear up under the crankcase and expose yourself to the elements as little as possible?”.

    “For good protection he must be protected overhead and on all sides by barrier shielding.”

    Be it earth/concrete/lead/water/snow-ice…any barrier you can find and make do with. A trench/foxhole gives you shielding except for the sky shine.*see book. “An open trench gives poor protection”.

    Q.2. “what if you are in your trench and it begins to rain. Will the rain wash contaminated particles into the trench?”.

    Yes…It would be a good idea to use a HUGE tarp and rope at the very first stage of expedient fallout shelter building.
    Tarp a huge area over…above and beyond the area you will be working…can also make a “tent” with it. Making things fairly well sealed and (Keeping your work area dry).

    Keeping this big tarp up for the long term would also help give redundancy to the other weather/water proofing measures to be taken when building and would help keep fallout away. (Also some shade…plus some extra space other than the fallout shelter itself)?
    Then make a “gutter”/trench to collect any water and direct it away.

    And then…
    …essentially you are needing to dig a rainproof dugout/trench…
    …some kind of “roof”…(poles/doors)…entrance…(sandbags/earth bags)…
    Followed by a layer of plastic…followed by mounding earth (sheilding)…making an earth arch.(see book…).

    Some of the more simpler (E.F.S.)-Expedient Fallout Shelters…
    use logs/doors/plywood…
    and in my last post i suggested a length of culvert cut in half and made to fit into a wood frame that fits over and that is wider than the trench…followed with plastic then mound earth and then make trench for rain. (or some kind of arched roof).

    Maybe even somehow…curved/bent rebar with long/strait pieces… tied with wire and chicken wire/plastic then berm?

    The foxhole/trench/truck shelter idea would have to be VERY temporary…such as the character used it…until…somehow you could get to a larger fallout shelter.
    ALSO remember:
    “In warm or hot weather, shelters. especially crowded ones, must be well ventilated and cooled by an adequate volume of outdoor air pumped through them.”
    AND:
    “Turns in passageways are very effective in reducing the amount of radiation entering a shelter through them. A right-angle turn, either from a vertical or horizontal entry, causes a reduction of about90%.”

    Q.3. They will have decreased in rads as before mentioned but where does one go then?”.

    “Whenever practical, expedient shelters should be built so that they can be readily enlarged to make semi-permanent living quarters. After it becomes safe to emerge for limited periods, occupants could sleep and spend much of their waking time in such a rainproof dugout that affords excellent protection against continuing radiation.”

    Sheltering in place preferably IN your fortified/fallout protected home where you have all your preps is ideal…AND…
    having a vehicle loaded up with the basics for when not at home or not able to get home
    and making do with where you are…or preferably…getting to a retreat?

    One last thing…

    Winter…?
    “Building is difficult if heavy rain or snow is falling or if the ground is deeply frozen. (However, untrained Americans have built good fallout shelters with shielding provided by 5 or more feet of packed snow,11 including a winter version of the Crib-Walled Pole Shelter described in Appendix A. The practicality of several Russian designs of snow-covered expedient shelters also has been demonstrated by winter construction tests in Colorado”.

    Hope this helps?

    God bless!

  38. Outstanding short story. Thanks so much! : – )

  39. oldgreyguy says:

    Winds aloft info available to aviation community at:
    http://aviationweather.gov/windtemp.
    Info is coded, key is at the bottom of the page.

  40. Great read – hope there are many more in your head even if a book is not.

  41. Tactical G-Ma says:

    Ron,
    I love the story but my head is reeling! What I “knew” before this thread started, I am no longer sure of. Like many subjects in the media, one must separate the wheat from the chaff. Guess I’ve got to dig out some of my manuals and do a refresher on NBC.
    I hate getting old. I used to know so much of this stuff and now it’s like a distant dream! Thanks to you and everyone else contributing, I now know how little I do recall.

  42. Please everyone. Keep in mind that working at a nuke plant and the levels one might be exposed to there is not really comparable to what we may be exposed to in a nuclear war.
    In nuke plants we measure in milli rads, Radiation Absorbed Dose, or milli rem, Radiation Exposed Man, In nuclear war we measure in whole Rads or Rems.
    Full disclosure, I once worked security at the now closed Kewaunee Nuclear Power Plant in Wisconsin. I am also a Nuclear Safety Officer, recognized by the state of Texas, although I am not in that field at this time.

  43. Tactical G-Ma says:

    Ron,
    I want to do some reading from other sources to verify my facts.
    But I live south west by at least 100 miles of any major city, reactor, or power plant. However, I am west of but fairly close to Ft. Benning. I don’t have a shelter but to reduce exposure from fallout I have reams of 6mil blk plastic and tons of duct tape to seal windows, doors, vents, etc. I also intend to bring my animals into the studio attached to the house. Reaching that two week time is the goal. After a couple weeks and a few rain showers the ground and water, I thought would be safe but tilling would be recommended for gardening. I also was under the impression that nuclear winter would effect the climate depending upon the size of the explosion, just like Mt. Penatubo erupting effected our climate for 3 years. Is all of this bogus or am I totally diluded?

    • I don’t think you have to worry about the nuke plants. If they have a serious problem any explosions will not be a nuclear explosion, more like a dirty bomb.
      By all means use the plastic and tape to seal your windows if they leak air. Newer, modern, windows don’t need this unless the glass has been broken out.
      Nuclear winter… unless every nuke in the world were detonated on the surface I would not worry about it. And then I wouldn’t worry much.

    • Tactical G-Ma…….you meant to say you live in the southeast right? Ft. Benning is in Georgia.

      • Tactical G-Ma says:

        Tennessee Ed,

        I live west of Ft. Benning in Alabama with a prevailing wind out of the southwest. So, it is likely, altho Benning is a hi-profile local, any fallout from there would go on to the northeast and I would be spared of that. Any other reactor or power plant is far enough away and completely out of the prevailing wind unless there was an Alberta Clipper coming thru pushing the stuff to the south. Even Redstone Arsenal is northeast by a few hours.

  44. Brearbear says:

    @ Tactical G-Ma
    1. “I don’t have a shelter but to reduce exposure from fallout I have reams of 6mil blk plastic and tons of duct tape to seal windows, doors, vents, etc. I also intend to bring my animals into the studio attached to the house.”

    The duct tape/plastic with a good seal… will help keep out fallout dust.
    For good protection from radiation… you need barrier shielding overhead and on all sides for you and your animals.
    Proper ventilation also is very important.

    If you can i suggest building a permanent fallout shelter. And like i said have a vehicle with expedient tools/gear/equipment at the ready…

    2. “Reaching that two week time is the goal. After a couple weeks and a few rain showers the ground and water, I thought would be safe but tilling would be recommended for gardening.”

    If it is a limited war…and you KNOW where the strikes have hit…and with proper radiation meters/and communications… it might be safe to emerge for limited periods after 2 weeks. Be prepared even in a limited disaster to stay mostly indoors for quit awhile possibly.

    If it is a MAJOR war…strikes may be ongoing…and there would be no way to tell when to come out safely…possibly for a long time…a strike could hit multiple areas today…a few strikes next week…
    And more next month…war is hell.

    That is why i also suggested having a permanent bermed coop/fallout type shelter barn…sealed fallout greenhouse…putting as much good soil in sealed plastic for growing in future….and i also suggest maybe laying huge tarps over gardens prior to fallout reaching your place.

    3. ” I also was under the impression that nuclear winter would effect the climate depending upon the size of the explosion, just like Mt. Penatubo erupting effected our climate for 3 years.”

    “Myth: Unsurvivable “nuclear winter” surely will follow a nuclear war.”
    “Facts: Unsurvivable “nuclear winter” is a discredited theory”.

    “Persons who want to learn more about possible post-attack climatic effects also should read the Fall 1986 issue of Foreign Affairs. This issue contains a long letter from Thompson and Schneider which further demolishes the theory of catastrophic “nuclear winter.” Continuing studies indicate there will be even smaller reductions in temperature than those calculated by Thompson and Schneider.”

    http://www.oism.org/nwss/s73p912.htm

    I really hope this helps Dear Soul…
    (i know this question was not directed at me…my only hope is that this may help you).

    God bless

  45. Brearbear says:

    Dear Pack…

    Like i said…i am no expert…my only hope is that WE can all learn and teach each other…

    …like Tactical G-Ma has said…research this VERY important issue and verify the facts.

    ALWAYS take what you read OR hear…
    here on this blog…or anywhere in life “with a grain of salt”…

    All information i…humbly have “learned”…and gathered are from the net..books etc.

    I am only human…and although i do my best to back up everything i
    Write/say with quotes from source…they may be wrong/so…i may be wrong!

    If i Am WRONG…i will humbly appologize before you all.

    I write my thoughts…ideas…experiences..and research…
    And study as much as i can..with the hopes of helping save lives!

    I am grown up enough…and can take any criticism…or correction that may come…

    I come seeking knowledge…and I want to help others.

    May we ALL work together…as a community and prevail!

    Thank You!

    Brearbear

    • Tactical G-Ma says:

      Brearbear,
      I hope you know, I didn’t mean a slam to any contributor. I meant more like trust but verify.
      I am dumb founded because I know that i read somethings about this and low risk targets within the past 5 years. That’s why I bought the plastic and tape. I either totally got it wrong (which is really possible) or I found informatio for when one cannot reach a fallout shelter. I just need to find the exact supporting information. I will let folks know anything i find.

  46. Tactical G-Ma says:

    Ron or TTT or any cubbie
    What type, if any radiation detector/s should be in our homes and preps?

    If stated earlier, I missed it.

    • G-Ma,
      I would recommend the old Civil Defense 777 kits, Depending on the specific units you’ll get a CDV 700, a low range (milli rads) with headset so you can hear the clicking. A CDV 715, a high range (up to 500 rads) Some kits will have 2 @ 715′s.
      3 to 5 Personal rechargeable Dosimeters and 1 Dosimeter Charger.
      There are also CDV 717′s, a high range instrument that comes with a detector that is detachable and a 25 ft cable. Place that outside and you don’t need to go out to take readings.
      Just checked ebay and the kits are selling for under $300. Individual instruments for as little as $35. Just make sure the Booklet comes with each instrument.
      These instruments are well made, sturdy, simple to operate, and work on D cell batteries.

      • Tactical G-Ma says:

        Ron
        Thanks for checking. I was thinking of something like the 717. I was thinking i would prefer analog. I think that’s a good choice but I’m going to look at the one Brearbear mentioned, too. Seems like all my preps are getting more sophisticated and expensive as I become more prepared. Sure wish I’d win the lottery!

        • The source Brearbear provided also sells the Civil Defense Instruments. They charge more because they calibrate them. I dont think in WWIII the calibration is all that important. My experience is the majority of them still work and we will not be too concerned with a + or – 5 %.

  47. Brearbear says:

    Now i…recently..was…only a humble oilfield worker in northern Canada…and am not affiliated with this company…and i am certain there are many other fine companies out there so research…

    http://www.ki4u.com/products1.php

    I really wanted to buy this and suggest it:
    ‘The Package’
    Radiation Safety Combo Package (it even includes the N.W.S.S.book)…but unfortunately
    Ki4u only does USA sales only for the whole “package”…we canucks will have to buy items individually through dealers?

    AND:
    App. C: A Homemade Fallout Meter, the KFM (you can make your own or even buy one online).

    How to Make and Use It
    http://www.oism.org/nwss/s73p938.htm

    Both sites i have quoted from and left links in mymany comments.

    I suggest everyone read the nwss free ebook…and ki4u web site to get a good start in researching.

    Brearbear

  48. Good read, It left me wanting more. I will say he was lucky that his truck stalled over a patch of the softest dirt road in the world. To move that much dirt with a small folding shovel in that amount of time was amazing. A “Human Ditch Which”. You should write more.

  49. Excellant read brother Ron!! Too bad you couldn’t include some illustrations with the story…..I know your capable of that too :)

  50. Thanks bro Ed. Appreciate the kudo. When is the primary in TN? BTW: I decided to submit the paperwork on that job. Thanks for the tip.

    • Primary is August 7th. But I go straight to the general elections on November 4th.

      Let me know if and when you get contacted from somebody at the Fort about the job…….I’ll do a lit’l recon for you.

  51. Well written and thoroughly enjoyed.