What did you do to prep this week?



First off I would like to thank everyone for their help in making The Survivalist Blog one of the most popular and widely read survival type blogs online today. We are now up to an average of just over 10,000 direct hits per day plus 7,860 readers by RSS and Email.

Folks that’s a total of 17,860 active readers… Wow! And we keep growing… it looks like more people are starting to pay attention to what is going on and realizing that the world is an uncertain place and they are preparing for it…

As for preps this week check out the pics below…

1x1.trans What did you do to prep this week?

Two videos:Brass Tacks Kem-'Ba-Tivz and The Art of the Tactical Carbine 2

1x1.trans What did you do to prep this week?

Book: Tennessee Vegetable Gardening

1x1.trans What did you do to prep this week?

Two Ruger 10/22 magazines

What did you do to prep this week?

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Comments

  1. Schatzie Ohio says:

    MD, I have noticed that lately your preps seem to be mostly books. Do you not need to prep for food any more?

  2. Had an interesting week. Did some shopping locally and at Costco (65 miles north):
    Guns & Gun Stuff:
    Cleaning solution for sonic cleaner
    100 rnds 357 brass
    20 rnds .451 250 gr bullets

    Food (into Storage):
    2 x10.7 oz containers of True Lemon
    2 x 16 oz Tang
    6 x 66 serve Dehydrated Hash Browns
    4 cans of Roast Beef
    25 lbs Table Salt
    25 Lbs Granulated Sugar
    50 lbs Calrose Rice

    Finally got to see the latest NatGeo Doomsday Preppers. Picked up one or two ideas, but mostly I’m glad I’m not them. Prepping here in Montana is a little different than most places with shorter growing seasons and less things available locally. But I think that lets me focus on what I can do.

    Finally getting our snow, better late than never, as our snow is other’s water later in the year.

    Keep you RADAR on and preps moving forward!

    • JP, one good thing I got out of Doomsday Prepper was I need more water than I have. A few other things but that was one. I have a pool that I can distill but I realized I need more drinkable water on hand.

  3. Thanks go both ways M.D. thank you for this site and the information you and everyone else provides. Some of us may in this alone but we always have the Wolfpack at our backs to help out. So thanks to everyone for all you do!! Preps this week I got two books in this week one is a really great read called Dirt-Cheap Survival Retreat by some guy named M.D. Creekmore, small book but lots of great tips in it. I thought about this type of thing a few years ago, it would be nice to get a small place and paid for and not have to worry about house payment etc. etc. but never did it and sure wished I would have.. Aslo go Holding Your Ground by Joe Nobody but have not started it yet. Got some Augason Farms in to fill in some gaps in the storage, has anyone tired their vegtable stew blend??? I am getting some of those instead of individual vegtables since I will probably not be making full fledged meals if shtf and more soup, stew and all in one dinners. Seems like I am always doing something that is tied to one of the guest posts that week. Went to the eye doctor and found I had a small change in my eyes so ordered years worth of contacts and will be getting some spares of glasses made next month. Thanks Pack for keeping me informed and up to date..

    • Vienna (Soggy prepper) says:

      http://www.zennioptical.com/

      Super cheap and decent eyeglasses. I ordered a pair for the BOB. Do not get tinted unless you want to look like a hippi! (my bad, but they are a spare pair sooo)
      Had a co-worker order and she loves them!

      • Yeah, I checked the site out the other day , going to get my eye prescription this week and order a pair of reg and bifocals.. That will give a pair for my BOB and Get home bag and two pair for the house and then I still have about 4-5 pair of older ones.

      • Vienna, Lol about looking like a hippie. I actually have tinted glasses for reading because any light bouncing off of paper gives me a massive headache.

    • George, I have not purchased any goods form Augason Farms yet. Curious as to what their shelf lives are for soups?

    • Garden Mom says:

      I read and reread that same Dirt Cheap Survival Retreat book – great ideas and details. I actually now understand the concepts for solar energy, batteries, wiring, etc. DH and I looked at trailers yesterday and had to use code in front of the sales rep. “Good storage for our supplies”, etc. But, we think we have found a suitable trailer that fits the criteria in the book – so that’s exciting.

  4. Well this has been by far my best prepping week. The legal transfer of 75 acres I inherited just went through (~50 farm acres and 25 woods.) In addition, yesterday I closed on the purchase of a. 4 bedroom log home on 25 acres adjacent to what I inherited. The 50 acres are rented out but there is plenty of room for a very large garden, which my wife is looking forward to. Its 12 miles from our current suburban home. We are not moving (for several reasons I wont get in to) but it will be our weekend/summer place and now switching to bugging out to there if something happens. As such, the majority of our preps aside from the food that we cycle through will go there. Another great feature will be being able to shoot on my own land.

  5. village idiot says:

    Reloaded 100 rds. of .357 ammo with my new(to me) RCBS Rockchucker press. I also bought some .45acp dies, and went to the gun range and scrounged up almost a coffee can full of used brass, yet to be sorted. It looked like mostly 9mm. I also got a $5o gift card from Atwoods for my bd, and went down there and bought some .223 ammo, some fertilizer, a new shovel, some propane, and a few other minor things. I’m also looking for a .22 cal revolver, so I’m headed to the gun shop right now. That’s it, thanks.

    • village idiot, if you don’t intend on reloading the brass you pick up like 9mm or any caliber you don’t shoot I would like to recommend what I do:
      1. Get to know other shooters at the range and exchange brass you picked up for the brass you need (barter/trade)
      2. It can be recycled as yellow brass at the recycling center that handles metal. It has paid bills when I had some rough months.

      • village idiot says:

        Mr. Jarhead, I trade the brass I pick up at the gun range for gunpowder with a guy who works at the local gunshop. I just got a can of Unique for 5 coffee cans full of 9mm brass. I don’t shoot that lightweight stuff. I keep all the .38/357, .44, .45 and larger brass to reload. I haven’t ever reloaded any .45acp, but now I have the powder and the dies, so I’m going to load some this week. Good advice, though, thanks.

      • Jarhead o3. A friend of mine takes a trip to Oakland Calif a couple of times a year and sells brass to a recycler.He says it is his part of the underground econenmy.He says so in a joking manner.He made over 600 dollars last year selling some dental gold that he found.

        • Axel, my dad used to pick up cans, bottles and paper to supplement the Social Security checks. When I begged to go on my first gun shoot he told me pick up all the brass. His friends would buy it or he could take it to the recycler.

          Brass is a valuable commodity. I save all the brass I shoot and the brass my friends shoot. I need to buy a brass catcher lol.

  6. Hunker-Down says:

    I spent the week watching this;

    http://www.youtube.com/watch_popup?v=L7N6slVrQeY&vq=medium

    And then I got me some store bought bullet holes( for OPSEC)!

  7. First off, I want to say that I hope we didn’t “lose” anyone this week, as in them saying bye,bye! Considering the OPSEC with who could be watching, I am going to be very careful in the future. No job yet for the close relative even though they are looking hard. Trying to keep my ears open for them.

    We keep stacking it higher around here: DH ordered another canvas carry bag for one of the rifles and is ordering some reloading supplies at the moment. This week I concentrated on first aid supplies for the BOB’s. My bag has this kit and I bought pain meds, antibiotic ointment, ice packs, ammonia inhalants, emt shears, sterile gauze rolls, butterfly bandages and surgical tape. For the home kit I got a pair of surgical scissors, N95masks and more generic Prilosec (try to buy with coupons when I can). At Wallyworld I picked up thermal shirt and snow boots on sale for 50% off, kitchen towels (old ones go in the emergency kits), vinegar and 25 lbs sugar. Then I went and filled up 2 of the vehicles with gas before the price rises anymore. Yikes!
    Everyone please stay safe out there.

  8. It’s been a week of activity for me. I received the two books I ordered last week, The Dehydrator Bible and Home Dairy: All You Need to Know to Make Cheese, Yogurt, Butter & More. I had been eagerly anticipating the dehydrating book and expected to read that one first. But the book on doing home dairy stuff caught my interest. I read the whole book in one night (except for the last chapter). If you have already been making cheese and yogurt, the book probably wouldn’t give you anything new. But if you are a beginner like me, it’s worth the money. Here’s my review.

    The book is divided into nine chapters. The first chapter is a basic introduction and gives a brief history of cheese making from ancient times up through the modern industrial factories and back to the make-it-myself movement. The second chapter is an explanation of the basic ingredients needed to make cheese, yogurt and butter. The third lists the equipment you will need; it starts with the bare essentials (stuff most of us already have) and then lists equipment to make specific products (like cheddar requires a cheese press, which you can make yourself). Chapters 4-7 is the heart of the book: Chapter 4 deals with butter and ghee; Chapter 5 deals with yogurt, buttermilk, kefir, and sour cream; Chapter 6 deals with cheese; Chapter 7 deals with ice cream. These are the how-to chapters with step-by-step instructions, recipes and pictures. Chapter 8 gives some recipes for how to use all the dairy products you’ve made. Chapter 9 (which I haven’t read yet) is a how to make body care products (scrubs, bath soaks, facial cleaners).

    As I said, I wouldn’t recommend the book if you already know how to do this stuff. I just prefer having the recipes from a book (instead of a website). And I am a beginner so the book was really informative. The author has a blog if you are interested in checking her out. (I am not affiliated with her, her blog or her book other than I thought the book was helpful for a beginner.)

    http://small-measure.blogspot.com/

    I am going to check out additional books in the “Homemade Living” series. (She also has on caning & preserving, bee keeping and keeping chickens.)

    I started my seeds for my late spring garden. My early spring garden is already in. (Maybe the rest of the U.S. calls this a “winter” garden. LOL) We had a hard freeze last week but I covered everything with blankets and tarps. So I didn’t get any freeze damage. Temperatures are back up to 80 degrees. Here’s what’s already in: green onion, celery, cilantro, basil, sweet red pepper, pineapple, red onion, garlic and a lone tomato. I started seeds for collards, tomato (Beefsteak and Rutgers), yellow squash, zucchini, cucumber, onions, jalapeno peppers, green peppers, cayenne peppers, and three different kinds of lettuce. I would have started more but I ran out of peat pots. I bought seeds for Swiss chard (Bright Lights) and snow peas. I also picked up flower seeds–daisies, coneflowers, marigolds and zinnas.

    My Excalibur has not arrived yet. It is being shipped from California. So I probably will not get it until Tuesday. My rennet tablets arrived. I am still waiting on the citric acid that I ordered. When that comes in I will try my hand at making mozzarella. I also learned that ricotta cheese can be made from the whey left over from making mozzarella. (This leads me to suspect that whoever invented lasagna just threw together a goulash, and it became popular.)

    I picked up another 200 rounds of ammo for my Glock. I also restocked some hygiene products that we’ve used up. I bought a dozen boxes of pasta BOGO. That’s my report for the week.

    • Oh, I forgot to thank everyone who suggested summer veggies containing calcium. It was because of these recommendations that I planted Swiss chard and collards.

      • Planted? And here I am in the planning stages of starting my seeds. We’re waiting for the butt-kicking snow/ice storm Mother Nature usually gives us this time of year.

    • Gayle,
      “Here’s what’s already in:”. Gawd I hate braggarts, LOL. We won’t even start planting the seeds indoor for nearly another month. I don’t think I would like the hot weather down were you live, but sometimes the longer growing season is very tempting.

      • HeeHeeHee. I have my seed trays sitting out in the driveway. It’s a balmy 75 degrees out right now.

      • First I have to get over pantry porn/envy. Next come garden porn/envy……

        • Cat,

          I have the same issues. Pantry prorn–yep, admitted to that one last week. Did you see the garden folks in Doomsday Prepper’s? I want my garden to look like that.

      • OhioPrepper, Don’t be too envious, last year by May 15th our daily temp. was near 90 degrees. By the middle of June its too hot for most vegetables. Sweet potatoes are the only vegetable that I can grow that tolerates the summer heat.

        Gayle, are you planning to plant green or yellow beans? I have had great success with Contender bush beans (green) and Goldrush wax beans by Burpee. Look for them at Lowes. I have a great Five-Bean Salad recipe which I use both of these beans.

        • MareBear,

          I might grow some Blue Lake but I can direct sow those the first or second week in March. I’ll put some carrots in as well. I forgot to mention that I stared some eggplant (Black Beauty) and some turnips, yellow onions, beets (Detroit Red), some spinach, peas, and two more kinds of cucumber (Armenian Yard Long and Ashley.

        • O.P.,

          Our summer gardening season is pretty much over by June 1. After that, it’s just too hot to grow anything. And the humidity gets so bad that if anything did grow, it would get fungus and other diseases.

        • MareBear,

          When do you put your sweet potatoes out? I am wondering if I can wait until May.

          • Gayle, My Dad used to wait til everything else was just about gone (late June or early July), then he would till everything under and plant the sweet potatoes….and our summers are scorchers too. We used to also have a second harvest of pink eye purple hull peas, but they had to be heavily dusted with Sevin dust to keep the lice away.

            • Becca,

              That’s what I am thinking about doing. Sweet potatoes can handle the heat. And I don’t have enough room in my garden to plant as many sweet potatoes as I want until the Spring garden peters out.

        • MareBear, thanks for the tip on the beans. I planted Blue Lake last year and they were terrible – really dry. They were my only failure in the garden ): I’ll try these that you’ve recommended this year.

          • Conmaze,

            Ugg. I was planning on planting some Blue Lake. Maybe I will get some of the ones MareBear suggested.

            • Here in central Illinois I have always planted blue lake bush beans and always had far more than I could handle for fresh eating, providing some of family and neighbors and when they really set on heavy in September for canning and I still would have to pull the vines as they just keep setting new beans until the first frost.

          • Gayle, May is the perfect time to plant your sweet potatoes. I have actually planted a crop of green beans, harvested and then planted the sweet potatoes in the same bed. You need 120 days of growing time for a sweet potato crop.

            Conmaze, I found out that Blue Lake is the green bean grown commercially. Be sure to harvest the Contender bush bean just as the bean begins to swell. If they begin to look lumpy they can get tough.

            • MareBear,

              Perfect. I will wait until my tomatoes get done, add compost (by then my compost will be ready) and plant sweet potatoes.

          • Conmaze and Marebear,

            What kinds of tomatoes do you all plant? I have Beefsteak and Rutgers. But I was thinking about experimenting.

            • Gayle,
              Last year I did Purple Cherokee, Early Girl, and a couple of other heirloom varieties that I can’t remember now. I didn’t like any of them except the Early Girl (heirloom) I also planted Roma for canning. One that I will store seeds for because it is a hybrid is Sweet 100 cherry tomatoes. OMG, that plant produced sooo many tomatoes from early to first freeze and they are the sweetest I’ve ever had! You only need one plant, that’s for sure. I will be planting Beefsteak also.

            • Conmaze,

              I planted some Early Girl last year and had tomatoes for Easter dinner.

            • The Prepper says:

              Check out the tiny tim tomato variety as well! They give you a TON of production with very little space. Perfect to grow on your balcony.

        • MareBear,

          Seminole pumpkins grow in the Everglades all summer long. Tastes like a winter squash. Not bothered by bugs or disease.
          You should try some!

          • Kate,

            Thanks for the tip. I am looking for things that will grow in June, July and August. I sure hate to see a barren garden.

          • Kate in GA, Thank you for suggesting Seminole pumpkins, many gardeners don’t know about them. But, Kate, I harvested over 25 Seminole Pumpkins from three seeds last year and my freezer has layers of orange frozen wafers of Seminole pumpkin even as we speak. So, this year I plan to pass on the Seminole pumpkin and try Buttercup Winter Squash. I don’t know if Central FL is too hot for Buttercup, but I want to try.
            Gayle, As for tomatoes, Celebrity is a good tomato and you can find six packs of seedlings at Home Depot or Lowes. As for paste tomatoes, I have grown Roma’s for the last two years and have done well with them. You can find six packs of seedlings for them as well. This year, I’m growing San Marzano and Amish Paste tomatoes. I had to start them myself, the Big Box stores don’t offer them.
            Gayle, you know about planting your seedlings deeper than just the pot?

            • MareBear,

              I have grown both the Roma and the Celebrity with success. Yes, I do clip off the not-true-leaves and bury up to the first true leaves. With our temperatures, they need a deep root base.

            • Marebear,

              This is the first year I am trying to grow tomatoes and green peppers from seed. In the past I’ve just gone to Home Depot and picked up the 6-packs. But last year I got all kinds of volunteer tomatoes growing out of my compost pile. That gave me the confidence to start them from seed. I also had volunteer green peppers. (None of them produced anything worthy of mention. Last year I did mostly hybrid.) This year I want to grow from seed and save seeds for next year.

              So I aspire to learn seed saving. It’s better to start learning now than to wait until society collapses–at that point I won’t be able to run to Home Depot to buy more seeds.

  9. Well got the last of my seed catalogs. Makes one dizzy to see the varieties and most of all the prices.
    The last one so far was “Tomato Growers Supply Company”. If you think you have seen tomato’s you need this catalog. Mercy, what a mass of different tomato’s. Must be over 300 different tomato choices. Hard the choices with this catalog.
    I bought more seed starting trays with the pellet thingy’s. You can get them a lot cheaper than buying the pellets alone.
    I bought some hybrid seed. Burpee’s at Wally World cheaper than ordering it. Figure if they produce more will have more to can.
    Bought another package of sewing needles. Then came home and went through my sewing stuff and getting it all to gether still need to find some things. Need to get a sewing storage thing on wheels.
    Forgot ink again. Mind must be shot after all.
    They didn’t have a binder, can’t get over that store.
    I went through my needle work supplies (one of the things I did to get out of the doledrums). Have listed some things to get to keep the supply up. So I purchased 3 balls of crochet cotton to have on hand.
    I went through the grocery section. Some shelves empty and some items were outright gone. So maybe more are prepping.
    Got more canning rings and lids.
    I don’t know even now if anything drastic will happen, but as things are going we can most assuredly see a price hike in food and everything else going up. So hope we have a few more months to continue with getting preps.

    • Ellen,

      Thanks for the tip on the tomato catalog. I ordered a catalog from them. They aren’t associated with Monsanto, are they? Does anyone know of a website that lists non-Monsanto seeds?

      • Gayle
        Not that I know of. They sell both hybrid and heirloom seed.
        The back of the catalog has some other seeds, peppers, eggplant I think.

      • Gayle,
        I really like Seed Savers Exchange for open pollinated heirlooms.

        • Nessie,

          I have heard of them and really like the concept of sharing seeds–of keeping the old time seeds available for future gardeners.

          • Gayle
            Yeah I don’t belong to SSE, but I do order each year from their catalogue. Their selection of beans and squash is amazing. I look forward to hearing how your garden goes this year, we don’t plant outside for another two months. Starting kale and leeks indoors this week. Have you ever made your own kale chips?!? So good.

        • Hunker-Down says:

          Nessie,

          I had a disappointing experience last year with Seed Savers Exchange. This happened with 3 different packages of seeds, all of which we had never grown.

          Their were no growing or zone instructions on the package. As an example, the front of one of the packages has ” Onion Allium cepa” and the companies address. The back of the package has boilerplate legalise ” Notice to Buyers” and “Limitation of Remedy”.

          If this was something we had experience with and knew the soil, moisture, timing, days to maturity, etc. it would not have been an issue.

          If one has grown something for several years and you know the answers to the above, SSE is the best place to buy from BUT if it’s a new variety for you, go elsewhere.

  10. i hope everyone had a great week. i just returned from the feed and garden store (my highlight of the week) i’m probably early but i bought 200 onion sets, 10 pounds each of red and white potatoes and 2 pounds of peanuts. next month i’ll get the beans, peas and corn.
    if you count clearing brush as prepping then i spent 2 days cutting brush around the pond and barn.
    i quess i’m going to take a break from watching and reading the news for several days (blood pressure is getting high again) and i’m getting stressed out from what i’m hearing. does anyone know how to lower pressure without taking the blood pressure meds? (i’m limited to what pills i can take). everyone take care if traveling this week.

    • Copperhead says:

      pam s
      I had to take some time away from all the news a couple of weeks ago. Just didn’t feel I could listen anymore and all of it was so out of my hands. It did help. I just did routine stuff around the house and homestead like everything was hunky-dorey. I don’t know of anything to help blood pressure, except I have read many times that spending extra time with your pets really helps. So love on your little four-legged friends! Oh, and I have a SIL that tells me we need to take slow deep breaths numberous times a day..supposed to relax your muscles and give you more oxygen. Don’t know if that works, or not.
      Take care…blessings!

      • copperhead, i went through the high blood pressure business when dh was in desert storm. i think i’ve petted the cats and dogs so much the last few days they are all going to need “rogaine” for hair loss. i am going to try you SIL advice on relaxation. take care.

    • Repair Mama says:

      Best suggestion I can give is lighten up on caffine, nice bubble bath,sit outside with soothing music and read or pet the cat. cat petting or dog petting does me wonders. hope it dont sound too corny
      take care and try to get calm. maybe it will come down a bit.

      • repair mama, it doesn’t sound corny, (i think i have a cat attached to each hip).

      • repair mama…you must have laughed when I wrote (a few days back) that i dance around in the yard from sheer joy at times…hope you did not find that corny…and I also pet and massage my DD’s dogs – we both enjoy it. cheers.

        • Repair Mama says:

          Chloe,
          Nothing corny about dancing in joy.
          it is good for the heart, mind, and just plain fun!
          Funny is the 220+lb fat old lady dancing in the hall or kitchen with broom in hand listening to the oldies.
          I have a good time and hope that DH doesn’t walkin to catch me!!! lol
          If it makes you happy, it is not corny!!
          enjoy!

          • repair mama…thank you…so good to know that we preppers can still enjoy our days, while still steadily working toward prepping for our family’s well-being and health…cheers.

        • Chloe,

          You mean it’s not normal to dance around the years from sheer joy? Now when you start dancing in your yard with your dog . . .

          • Gayle…you are too funny…when my DD brings the dogs over – they just love to run and leap up at me…and then turn and they do it again…dogs are always ready for a play…but there is no one about…

            whereas you have close neighbours…and that just makes me laugh even more.

            It is good that we remember to have some light moments – to balance out the news headlines….cheers.

    • jiaogulan tea capsules or hibiscus tea will lower blood pressure. There is a jiaogulan tea – but to me it tastes very bitter – couldn’t drink it! I plan to order the capsules.

    • Pam, it took about 2 years, but by taking magnesium capsules morning and night, and taking 2 TaiChi classes per week, I was able to get my BP down to normal and throw out my meds. Good luck!

      • Mindyinds,

        I wonder if a good many of these health issues like high blood pressure are exasperated by insufficient intake of minerals which in turn is caused by eating foods made from depleted soil. If magnesium is effective on high blood pressure (and I am not a medical doctor or a herbalist, so I am just conjecturing), then it is reasonable to suppose that our diets lack nutrients like magnesium, and high blood pressure is merely a symptom of underlying malnutrition.

    • Try a feet massage, that is massage your foot with the other one. Rub the bottom of your foot with ball of the other, then turn in the toes [of the bottom foot] and rub across the width of the foot working towards the heel. then back up to the toes. You’ll notice that top the foot is also getting massaged as you work on the other, don’t forget to switch back and forth between feet. Laying on your side massage the plantar [the bottom between the heel and toes] of the upper foot with the ball of the lower then slide it up using first the ankle then the calf, then as you slide down the calf dig into the plantar with your heel. At any time you find a soreness or tightness linger on that spot. Again note that the massaged foot is also massaging ankle or calf as it gets massaged. Use the heel to get at the toes and upper foot gently stretch each toe upward on the heel then press down on them gently. Pause between rubbing different areas to wiggle toes and flex feet up [stretching calves] then point toe down and reach with toe stretching clear up into the shin, then work the shin with both the side and the bottom of the foot, which also massages the foot at the same time. Breathing should be slow and deep not forcing air just useing the lungs. When your done with feet do your hands, note that most of the massages for the hands can be adapted to the feet. As you get use to this form you will be able to reach to the knee then massage the knee. Never force a stretch or a flex, always move slow. When pushing down on the heel [calf stretch] balance that with a toe stretch. Write the alphabet in the air with your toes, stretch and clench the toes to improve blood flow This is a good work out for those cold winter mornings when the covers are just too snugly to abandon yet, or when laying in the warm summer sands at the beach. You might find yourself doing this when reading or surfing the net. There’s a lot written what area of the foot ties to other organs, or symptoms [Reflexology] but for now just remove the tension and tightness from your feet and legs, if you stumble on a spot that helps a headache or something else, those are just bonus points. The most hypotension will be gained when just breathing and massage, but lacking time, do try to fit it in as you can. Another trick [this one from Hatha] is the complete breathe, where the in breathe is deep, useing the diaphram and stomach [ pushing down with diaphram and out with the stomach] to really take in air, pause. Then completly emptying the lungs, again really pulling in the stomach, up with diaphram to empty the lungs. Good energy in, in in and pause now release the bad, out, out out. repeat three times, on the third exhale only allow the lungs to relax, finding a volume that niether fills nor empties you, pant gently from the diaphram only moving a little air to sustain the calm between breathes. Gently embrace that calm and find a place to carry it with you till you can stop and take a breath again. This seems to work well with cycles of three, three in and outs, three times with three pauses in the middle to collect your calm. Visons can help, breathe in green light and spring, breathe out gloom and winter. Breathe in new habits, breathe out old vices. Breathe in confidence and strength, breathe out doubt and weakness. Gather the calm till you have a center, use the center to ground yourself to your purpose.

  11. Col. D Nashville says:

    This week another store in my area is closing it’s doors but it’s a big box retailer this time. Multiple markdowns but some of the items appeared overpriced to begin with. With that being said I did acquire some regular and synthetic motor oil for 25% off! Their food items were only 10% off at this point so I’ll wait a week or so. Some clothing was marked down as much as 70% on everyday and winter items and I’m going back today to add to my closet inventory. The store also has various hardware items marked down as much as 50% and I’m wondering what to pick up today. I had less than 30 minutes yesterday to walk around the store but there are some deals for sure. Any picking suggestions from the Wolf Pack?

    • Sir: I’d get anything that won’t break and won’t go bad. Inflation,(without food and gas), seems to be at our door. Airborne!, Cos

      • Col. D Nashville says:

        Cos, thanks for the encouragement, picked up some canned meat and other misc. items. Got our nephew a cool play set for almost nothing – he’s going to have fun at his birthday party!

    • Sir, bad to see business close down but it is your gain. Good run on the oil and tools.

    • Sir,

      I would consider getting the cotton clothing–t-shirts and underwear and socks, especially. If we have another year of drought in the South, cotton clothing might go through the roof. I expect summer to arrive early since we haven’t really had much of a winter. Hot temperatures with very little rain means another bad year for crops in the South.

      • cosmolined says:

        Gayle:
        Just a note. If you weren’t military there is no need to address
        a Senior Officer as sir. We worked for you! Cos

        • Cosmo,

          I thought that was the abbreviation for his avatar. LOL I have never served but my dad served for 21 years and another 19 civil service.

          • I have a funny story about using “Sir”. The first time I brought home a serious boyfriend (I was in college, mind you), I introduced the guy to my dad. The guy shook my dad’s hand and said, “Nice to meet you, Sir.”

            My dad responded thusly: “Two things, boy. First, don’t ever call me “Sir”. I was never an office. Second, how the hell do you know it’s nice to meet me? I might turn out to be a real son of a bitch.”

            The guy was so shocked. (He was a classicist (someone who reads Greek and Latin) and a publish poet. That guy was really a wuss.

            When I brought my now-husband home to meet my dad, my mom threatened him–you better be nice, or else . . .

            • LOL:
              Thanks Gayle. Cos

            • Hunker-Down says:

              Gayle,

              It sounds like your mom and dad were playing the good-cop bad-cop switchero.

              I’ll bet they had many good reasons!

            • Nuttbush54 says:

              Funny story about what your Dad said. My Dad used to say he was going to be cleaning his shotgun when the boys came over. Funny thing was the shotgun did not work that I knew of, Dad never took it down from the rack over the back door. Forty years later, guys I went to school with still remember that shotgun hanging over that door and tell the stories that it scared them all straight! I have never told the guys any different.
              For the record on the term “Sir”, down south we use the term as a sign of respect for the person, not their rank. If my children or grandchildren didn’t say Sir or Ma’am, they got a quick reminder.

            • Candy In Nebraska says:

              My DH has a gun rack that says BOYFRIEND REPPELNT on it. Sits right above his chair, no boy was safe…lol

          • Gayle lol that’s funny. Bet your dad was a riot.

            My older sis used to tell my nieces bfs don’t worry about their dad, as she points to pictures of me on the wall in full combat gear and another in a mixed martial arts cage with my hand raised says that’s her uncle, they are his life. Then she went back to being miss happy cheerful lady lol.

            • Jarhead,

              I have lots of funny stories about my dad. When he was in his 60s, there were to Marines (in uniform) stopped at a gas station getting gas. They were cat calling a young woman–being really disrespectful. Now, mind you these were two young, very fit men in their early 20s. My dad charged up to them and gave them a tongue lashing like they had probably never heard. I doubt those two men ever acted disrespectfully in uniform ever again. My mom and I were in the truck thinking, OMG, he is so totally going to get his ass kicked. But they didn’t try a thing.

    • Col. Don`t forget brake and auto trans fluid. Power steering fluid and filters.Some transmisions don`t have a filter just a permanent screen. You don`t do anything to the screen just drain and refill the trans.Some units don`t even have a dipstick you can`t add a quart or so these days.(kinda sucks) I would get trans fluid in gallon jugs since most trans uses allot of fluid and it clears out the 1 qt bottles Castrol and some other companies make synthetic blend oils wich is good stuff.I use that in my motorcycle.

  12. The Prepper says:

    Spent most of this week reading about gardening and testing out some new ideas. I followed Gayle’s awesome suggestion and planted a celery bottom after soaking it. Hope that bad boy comes up! Also built a second worm bin using the following plan:

    http://whatcom.wsu.edu/ag/compost/easywormbin.htm

    My first bin has worked wonders, and I’m hoping to eventually have 6 – 8 bins actively working our table scraps, cardboard and leftover news paper. If all goes well this week I should be able to check out a few more retreats. One of the retreats is just about perfect, though it’s currently out of my price range (isn’t that always the case?). What is the consensus on lowballing folks? I feel bad doing this, but if I offer what I can maybe it also benefits them if it gets them out of the home?

    • Prepper , I am currently trying to sell my house and would welcome any offer. It may seem my price is high but the way real estate works now if someone does not get the price down some they think they got screwed, so I have intentionaly priced mine to be able to go down 10-15% to get where I want to be. My house does not look like it is worth the price from the outside but it is over 5000 square feet inside and with a full basement so when you get inisde you can see it is priced in the same range as everyone else selling around here. So give the lowball offer, all they can say is no or come back with a better price for you.

    • The Prepper,
      You might also consider offering a Land Contract. I’ve both bought a house (my first) and sold one that way. Basically it’s a seller financed deal where you pay some amount and then make payments (with interest) to the seller. When I sold a home this way, the purchaser had great income but not enough equity to get a loan. After five years of paying down the principle and making improvements to the home, the bank had no problem making the loan.
      You could perhaps offer them a middle amount between what you would like to pay and what they’re asking, and have them finance the difference. It gets them out and gets you in, and assuming you’re paying rent or some other monthly payment doesn’t drastically affect your finances much.

    • Hunker-Down says:

      The Prepper,

      How would you feel if they accepted your first offer?

    • Prepper,

      I did learn that celery likes to be kept slightly moist at least until it roots good. (I lost two out of my first five plants until I figured out they needed more water. I put in two more plants this week.)

    • Prepper,

      It cannot hurt to put in a lowball offer. The worst they can say is “no”. And if they are hard up to get the place sold, they might just come back with only a slightly higher price.

    • The Prepper, I would like to hear more about your worm bins. Reading the link you provided raised a question. Do you position the second bin atop the first and the worms crawl up into the second bin? I think I missed a step or two. Thanks.

  13. riverrider says:

    hi all. kinds slow week, wife was down sick most of the week, really sick, but she’s on the mend now. got a couple canteen cups via a buddy, the ones with long handle, good for over a fire…stocked up on fire starters. bought out 2 major retailers’ stock of wooden matches, another gallon of lamp oil, various galvenized metal wash pans and buckets, a few more plastic buckets, and got the misses a ruger lcr22. she was thrilled:) bought a 10 pack of tin drip pans, made for under the grill, but i plan on using them for other things. for instance, could put a few charcoal brickets in one for a tiny no-smoke fire to cook breakfast on the river. leaves no trace either. ordered some new bdu pants. got the survival water straws i ordered last week. i’m told my combat bacon is on the way as is the order of spagetti noodles. spent way too much time on the net. lot of angry folks out there, i’m stepping up things to be as ready as i can by spring. also, yawl convinced me to store some preps at an alternate sight in case of emergency and i will be working on that. thanks to all who wrote articles this week, learned/shared a lot of good info. stack it high.out.

    • riverrider, i’m glad to hear the mrs. is feeling better and if you don’t mind my asking but what is combat bacon?

      • riverrider says:

        pam, yoder’s canned bacon, comes in a camo can,thus everybody calls it combat bacon:)

        • River, the combat bacon any good?

        • River, the combat bacon any good? Who did you order it through? GF and my nephew loves bacon more than do and wouldn’t mind ordering some.

          • Jarhead,

            EE has Yoder’s bacon on sale this month. I think Ron said it is just plain bacon–not smoked or seasoned like the bacon you get in the grocery store.

            • We popped a can this morning. Someone suggested heating it on a skillet or grill rather then in the microwave as it will taste better. Guess what? It does. The label says smoked flavored but till today I never noticed it.

          • riverrider says:

            j, 2nd try…..combat bacon is good if you consider that its for long term storage etc. excellent in other dishes, not too bad if heated in the skillet and the grease drained. we use it camping on the river and in the storage. ee has it on sale now and campingsurvival has it usually too.

            • River, thanks. The first post I put was cut off by a phone call and didn’t notice until the second post. Technology lol.

              Gayle, thanks, I will look into that as well.

            • River, I just ordered and received some of this last week and am glad to see your input on it’s quality. Now i am looking forward to it!

          • At the gun shop they have cans of “Tactical Bacon”. The label is mostly black. I thought it was the funniest thing I’d ever seen. But it’s like 16 bucks or something.

            I wonder, I guess I could can my own bacon. I’ve got a pressure canner. It just would be in glass instead of in a metal can.

            • Penny Pincher, there are some videos on youtube for canning bacon. I haven’t tried it yet, because I’m waiting for the monthly bacon deal from Zaycon Foods. All I know is that you wrap it in brown parchment paper to soak up the grease and keep the strips separated. There is a real method to it. Looks like a lot of work but, boy, would it be worth it!

            • I can bacon all the time. I buy the 3 pound package of end pieces at WM. You can go to ruralrevolution.com and look up her canning bacon post – that’s how I do it. I don’t can strips, I make bacon bits and just sprinkle it in everything. She cans in pints, I can in half-pints so I can use a little and not have to refrigerate. The nice thing is – strain all the fat off and you have a pretty good supply of lard.

    • riverrider,
      congrats on finally getting the lcr22, did it get to you in time for valentines day? I would love to find a source for the old style canteen cups, did your buddy simply have some extra or does he know a site that still has some available?
      Also, glad to hear your wife is doing better.

      • riverrider says:

        k, i’ll check w/ my bud on the cups. his wife was ill too so we didn’t get to chat….the lcr just came in friday.been so long they forgot who ordered it,glad i happened to stop by the shop when i did…the dw is still weak so she hasn’t shot it yet, just played with it:) but she likes the trigger pull and lack of hammer.

      • riverrider says:

        k, http://www.armysurpluswarehouse.com…3.99 plus shipping

        • riverrider,
          I ordered a couple of the cups as well as a few other things I had been looking for.
          So next question in my search for long lost gadgets – do you remember the metal stands that were used with these cups? They fit upside down under the cup in a 1 qt. canteen cover (although they were a bitch to get out of the cover at times), and were used as a stove base with a pinch of c4 for fuel back in the bad old days.
          Would love to find a couple of those also.
          Thanks for the link and for all the help you give everyone here.

          • k, i remember them. seen them in various surplus sites,shouldn’t be hard to find. try campingsurvival, or ctd, or sportsmansguide.

    • rr…had a laugh when i read you bought all the wooden matches…I do the same…and I vacuum seal them…and I also seal the .50cent lighters. cheers.

      • riverrider says:

        chloe, i’d like to buy a case of lighters but all i can find is small packages.

        • Vienna (Soggy prepper) says:

          ebay. I’ve been looking at lighters after reading Selco’s story. I haven’t bought any yet. I did find really skinny “gas” lighters at an outlet store for 25 cents. I didn’t know what they were, DH said they can be refilled. I’m thinking I like that 25 cent a piece price better then ebays, but I’m not sure yet. Still lookin’.

          • Vienna, anything is better than nothing at this stage…that is why I buy all the wooden matches I see…prefer my firesteel, then lighters, then matches.

            Gotta have plenty – as I don’t know how to make my own matches or lighters…and would definately cost me more than 90cents for 10 pack of 45 matches.

            And my time is better spent doing other prep things…so, while they are so cheap and readily available…in the trolley they go.

            Also, don’t throw out those old lighters…the spark is still enough to light a cotton ball impregnated with either metholated spirits/petroleum jelly/hand sanitizer…all work equally well.

            Try it and see, if you get a chance. cheers.

            • Vienna (Soggy prepper) says:

              Yeah Chloe, sometimes I don’t know why I don’t see the obvious. I’m not sure why I thought lighters more special then matches, especially considering how cheap matches are. Doh!

              I’ll just continue to add to matches and not focus on lighters.
              I love my fire steel too! I carry one in my purse! How many other “normal” women do that!?

      • Chloe, Is there a reason other than waterproofing why you vacuum seal the wooden matches?

        • Barbara…that is the main reason…

          however…what if our tough times last a very long time…

          I don’t want myself or DD/SIL to ever wonder why I did not take the little time and effort required today to ensure an easy way to start a fire in an uncertain future – even up to 10-15yrs in the future.

          However…being prudent – they are vac sealed, and also sealed in a nice and dry metal can – when can eventually rusts – matches will still be sealed against moisture – hence an extended period of use.

          Because the match tips can easily deteriorate with age…and the metal parts of the lighters will also rust – too much water in our atmosphere – i.e., humid tropics.

          I also vac seal them in the foodsaver bag, then place some in mylar bags that I have cut down to size…if I need to swim/wade across a waterway…I will always have lightweight back-up ways to start a fire, other than my firesteel.

          By vac sealing the 10 boxes – they sit flat in the buckets…I like to add some vac sealed pouches of salt and matches to each bucket…these small waterproofed items will be vital to have handy. Sprinkle salt on leeches, mix salt with water to help clean abrasions etc.

          cheers.

  14. Congrats on the growing success MD. I’ve read many other sites yet I always come back to this one. The format and knowledgeable subscribers really add depth. Thanks also to evryone who contributes. Also, since “Doomsday Preppers” premiered there is a rise in interest, and hopefully for the best.

  15. Kind of a slow week for me. I did watch parts of this week’s Doomsday Preppers and saw the Dervaes family “farm”. Now I have pantry envy and garden envy *sigh*

    I cleaned out some buckets from Sam’s so they are ready for the wheat I just ordered. I canned 12 half-pints of butter today and dehydrated bananas. My sister came to visit and brought two big bags of oranges so I sliced and dehydrated a couple to try them out. I took one slice and rehydrated it and, boy yippee, it was good! I purchased a single burner Coleman stove and some of those “Tap” lights.

    I’ve noticed a lot of the normal things I purchase (or look at with plans of purchasing) have all but disappeared from the shelves at Walmart. I then looked some of them up on the store website and they are out of stock online also. Some pretty scary stuff. Or not. Could mean that people are taking this seriously and there are more preppers than we think. It is closing in on tornado/hurricane season so maybe that has a little to do with it. Call me an optimist.

    I started reading Patriot a week or so ago. After reading One Second After, this is pretty slow reading for me. I have to skim through so many pages because he goes on and on and on about guns – makes, models, what type of ammo, etc. Plu-eeze. Enough! Let’s get to the point. I did read everyone’s posts on the firearms question though. I don’t have a gun yet and it was informative for me. Thanks to all for their input.

    I planted English peas, turnips and red potatoes this week and bought some seeds for storage.

    I printed out Where There is No Doctor/Dentist and have put them in binders for my library.

    Heard on NPR about the new drones down to the size of humming birds and they’re silent and anyone can use them. They’re saying they’re most useful for real estate sales people. Yeah, right. Now you can be followed into the cover of woods, it can fly into your property airspace and even look into your windows. So anyone can see just exactly where you go, what you’re doing and what you’ve got in and on your own property, and it’s not just the government, it could be anybody! FAA is fighting it saying a pilot’s license should be a requirement because they’re going to be dangerous to airplanes. There goes another part of our so-called freedom. Geesh, this is just too futuristic for me. Can anyone give us some good news for a change?

    Gee, I guess I did more than I thought I did!

    • MtWoman (N Central Texas) says:

      conmaze…I’m with you on things disappearing in stores, especially Wallmart. My son & I have been noticing changes for over 3 years, but it’s getting worse weekly now. When I have asked a store employee why a space is empty, I’ve gotten 2 answers….well 3: 1) “I don’t know” 2) “We can’t keep it stocked” and 3) “We’re not carrying that anymore.” #2 & #3 are the most common answers. The product that I’ve noticed the most changes in (less & less on the shelves, and/or odd brands that I don’t know) is canning supplies and water containers. This definitely says something to me: people are doing more of these things (canning, storing water, etc.). I think Katrina, Ike, the Joplin tornadoes, the Missouri & Mississippi floods, the storms on the East coast, the drought in the South, etc. in the last few years have people thinking. It makes me really anxious as I haven’t the money to get what I need NOW and I’m so concerned about not getting it. :(

      • MtWoman, I have gotten the same answers at my store for about the last year too, but I could always find the stuff online. That’s what is concerning me more than the store stock. Does make one pause. I’m with you on not being able to get everything I need/want now due to funds, that’s why I walked around the store making mental notes on things and placing them on my “priority” list. I have asked family members who live in different parts of the state to check my list of items I can’t find and look in their stores. They live in some pretty affluent areas and most of those type of folks don’t prep. Keeping my fingers crossed.

      • I’ve also noticed Walmart constantly being out of some items, but I’ve also noticed them jacking up the prices of some things, especially camping/survival gear. Magnesium fire starters were under $5 last summer, and are now over $7 at WM. It seems some stores are taking advantage of preppers, now that there’s been more and more mention of us in the media. I’ve found the best deals at my local ‘outdoor store’, and I usually find what I want to be in stock.

    • Conmaze
      I have noticed empty shelve in both the grocer and Wall Mart for the last year or so. But it has gotten a little worse.
      I am like you don’t know how to take it. Think that it will mean fewer people out looking for you and your supplies or that we will come up short in buying ours.

      • Repair Mama says:

        I was at wal mart tonight to purchase butter beans (large limas). went to save a lot 3 different times to fins the shelf empty. walmart shelf was almost bare in rice and beans, and the butter beans were 1.70 lb!
        what!!! walked away tonight but DH was with me and saw this too. So now when he sees me bring a bunch in he wont say much. I asked him if he could think of somewhere we could get them in bulk, and he actually thought about it. I will have to check locally.
        there were other things that looked odd as well mostly in canned things.makes me wonder…..

        • Repair Mama,

          If you bring the Save-a-lot ad to Walmart, you can get the Save-a-lot price at Walmart–they match competitor’s prices.

          • Repair Mama says:

            That was just the regular price. They never put butter beans on sale. I am just gonna buy a bunch when they get some in and vac pac in mason jars when I get them. I would rather eat these than pintos.
            I usually rake walmart over the coals with the ad papers and coupons every chance I get. I hate that store. they treat their employees little better than slaves. assholes!
            I would work at mcdonalds before applying to walmart.

            Gayle, I think you are one “Cool” lady. the skills that you talk about just amaze me! I dont know how you have enough time in the day to do these things. Wow
            Wonder woman!
            I wish I could do things like that! You are an inspiration to me and I am sure all of the others here.
            Thanks for everything

            • Repair Mama,

              I have mixed feelings about Walmart. Yes, they pay their employees badly. But a significant majority of Walmart employees (at least around here) don’t deserve much more than that. The vast majority of Walmart employees with whom I have interacted lack manners and basic communication skills. I was looking for a cheap watch that I could wear while cycling. I went to Walmart and asked the employee at the watch counter how to set the time. She said, “Does I looks like da instructions?”

              Now when I shop at Walmart I don’t ask for help. American consumers would rather save a dollar than demand decent customer service. (I ended up buying a watch from Pennys–the guy took it out of the box, set it for me, and then rung up the sale.)

            • Gayle you hit the nail on the head. The three hardest working employees at the Walmart I frequent are deaf custodians. Every time I see them they are working, mopping up spills, tidy things up and work.

              Felt bad, some morbidly obese lady on her lawn tractor sized scooter was yelling/screaming at one of the guys at him because he wouldn’t respond as he tried to sign he couldn’t speak.

              I politely said “Ma’am he is deaf, if you used that energy you use yelling into working out you wouldn’t be on that monster truck scooter. Good day ma’am” then signed something to him that mad him smile as the manager kicked her out.

            • MtWoman (N Central Texas) says:

              Jarhead…great post. We must remember our humanity.

              It also brought up thoughts about people with disabilities in a SHTF scenario. I think learning sign language is now up on my list with CPR & 1st Aid certificate renewal. I haven’t the means to isolate myself from the masses in a SHTF scenario (no farm or homestead to secure), so I am “arming” myself with all tools to protect myself and my family, and also to help others in the situation I am in.

              And who knows…sign language could come in handy in a dangerous situation where one needs to communicate quietly…as long as all parties understood it.

              Do you know: are there different ‘kinds’ of sign language?

            • Mtn Woman, As far as I know, American Sign Language (ASL) is what is taught. Many community colleges will offer ASL classes. I have a text book for ASL and have learned some basic signs, I have wanted to learn for a long time but have found it is harder to learn solo. If you have a person that you can attend class and practice with, it helps.

            • MtWoman, I grew up around a few deaf kids at school and a few ex girlfriends studied it in college as apart of curriculum.

              In the infantry we could tell each other how many enemy, how far and if they had heavy weapons or armored vehicles and to cover us as we move up and around to ambush them without saying a word. Its an asset. If you want to learn there are books, websites and videos to learn it. My skill with ASL is basic but gets me where I need.

    • conmaze How did you dehydrate the oranges? did you just slice with the peel on or slice after peeling. I am looking to get a dehydrator and citrus would be something I would really miss and be looking to put away.

      • George, I did it with the peel on this time, sliced about 1/4-inch thick. I’m next going to try peeling and segmenting and then cutting the segments in half so they will dry quicker. You can dehydrate the peel separately and then pulverize it in a food processor to add to baking (muffins?) or whatever you would use zest for. Now that I have done oranges I’m going to try lemons and limes too!

    • If you are worried about drones spying on you, a little defensive prepping can go a long way against this. There are a couple of ways you can detect and counter this.

      All drones broadcast in a frequency that can be detected. Some drones utilize multiple frequencies and encryption as to avoid signal interception and jamming. The smaller models typically use controllers found with RC planes.

      For the smaller drones I would suggest buying an RC controller used on model planes and as many frequency chips as possible. The more advanced RC controllers allow for assigning of an ID to avoid interference on the same frequency. So for the smaller sized drones that use RC parts as those favored by the animal rights groups, jamming those drones are fairly simple. Keep switching out the frequency chips and rotating IDs on the chips until erratic behavior is seen from your flying intruder. As the intruder gets closer to you and farther away from the intruder’s owner the easier it will become for you to assert control over the flying intruder. Once control is yours, fly that sucker into a pond, bond fire, or a wood chipper (what ever gives you the most satisfaction).

      Jamming the likes of a predator drone is considerably harder since it communicates via satellite to a remote location. If can still be done and the Iranians have proven that it can be done. You would need to have a radio transmit tower or dish of some sort on your property capable of broadcasting in multiple frequencies detected at an amplitude capable of overwhelming the power of the signal used to broadcast at the drone from the sat.

      All of the items needed to detect and jam radio frequencies are available commercially. Just keep in mind that jamming will draw the attention of the feds.

      For those of you wanting to be passive aggressive in nature they do sell white noise machines for the house. These machines turn the house in the guitar box of white noise rendering eavesdropping to a minimum.

      If you spot a drone flying around your property just out of range of a firearm and would like to send a message back to sender that they are unwanted, may I suggest using a S3 Krypton 1 Watt hand held laser (this is easier to purchase than the military equipment mounted onto M4s). The S3 has a range of 85 miles at 86 million Lux and is known to cause burns to skin. Mount that to a scope and aim it at the optics of the drone. At 8,000 times brightness to that of the sun, nobody is going to see anything.

      Food for thought.

      • riverrider says:

        cain, you lousy grunt you, i knew you were good for something, now i know what:) got any sources for that s3 laser? i had a bud that had a highpower linear amp tied into his cb/ham/multiband radio. one day a homey pulled up beside us blasting his stereo. my bud fiddled with the dials and keyed the mike. snap, crackle, pop, no more boom boom. any idea what that was? i’m thinking flood the airwaves in the band ,like emp, would work. must do more research on it…..

        • Cain, thanks for the info. I like the idea of flying it into the wood chipper LOL

          Ooh, ooh, riverrider, I need that boom box blower-upper for my no good for nuthin punk neighbors and their friends! Please post if you find out how to do it!

        • Stuff like this was a reason why my platoon sergeant always called me Sparks. Must be a carry over from his Vietnam days.

          Well there is a couple of ways to go about this.

          If the offender is playing the radio or has a CD radio transmitter in his truck broadcasting his favorite tunes to his radio then merely overpowering that frequency with your own radio broadcasting unit would be enough to drive him nuts. Watching him freak out as he tries to figure out why his 50 Cents song turned into say a Sesame Street theme song. It would be priceless. As you follow him around with the transmitter think of the hours of endless entertainment at his expense you’d get.

          I’ve read where a CB with a small linear amplifier will achieve the same results as I mentioned above. Would allow you to talk to him as well. Never tested something like this so I would not know. If this peon is a meth/heroin user maybe talking to him in the voice of the devil via his radio would be entertaining. Then again having him show up at your church saying he has seen the light might put a damper on your fun.

          I’ve read several instances where the CB with a high power linear amp causes damage, but again I’ve never seen first hand how it overloads the radio’s capacitors. I do not own a CB nor do I have an annoying neighbor playing loud music.

          EMP is a strange thing. The amount of power you’d need to zap his truck from say your house would cause problems for you. The first is everything in your house gets fried. The second is the electromagnetic radiation from that amount of power needed for that sort of EMP would scale from unhealthy to lethal to unshielded bodies.

          They have figured out how to weaponize EMP on a small scale without using a nuke. Saw a live demonstration of it on Future Weapons. They were using a wire suspended some 20 feet above the car as part of their EMP system. It killed everything electronic in that car. The testers sat no where near this system when they tested it.

          Now if that doesn’t tickle your revenge bone, I have heard, but in now way endorse, the following item. If this guy lives in a wood frame house (won’t work on stone or cinder block houses), go get yourself some piano wire. Hammer a nail into the side of his house and loop the piano wire to the nail than down to a stake in the ground. Get it tight. Once it is as tight as you can make it take a violin bow and strum away. The note should resonate through the entire house. At 3 am in the morning, it would scare the snot out of everyone in that house. For good measure take a caulk gun and glue every door and window shut before you do this. So the guy will bounce off his door trying to escape out of his house in a panic.

          Then again the simple, minced onion stuffed into the vents of his car would suffice.

          • Hunker-Down says:

            Cain,

            LMAO! Note to self; add violin bow to preps.

          • MtWoman (N Central Texas) says:

            Cain…you are FUN-ny! Even if I would never do any of these things, they will at least give me some chuckles when I IMAGINE doing them. Thanks for the giggles. :)

          • Cain, I LOVE your advice! I have a few neighbors I could do some testing with. I especially love the sesame street theme song idea, even better would be barney.
            Again….. Note to self, drinking coffee while reading this blog is a hazard to the computer…..

            • TG,

              We would like a full report. LOL I think the theme song from The Love Boat would work better than Sesame Street–just a personal preference.

          • Cain,
            I really do like the way you think! Some really good ideas ya got there. But yes, Barney over Sesame Street. I’m going to add Barney music to my prep list. Don’t have guns yet, but this could be a great tool against zombies. I love multi-purpose items!

          • We always used limburger cheese rather than the onion to fumigate cars, buggys, etc.

      • Two points on the laser.
        The FDA (yes FDA) does not allow importation and sale of any laser more than 5 MW capacity. There are several overseas suppliers that have higher energy lasers, but they are unable to ship them to US addresses. This is however better than the Australians who have a limit of only 1 MW.
        The second point is that pointing a laser at any aircraft is a federal offense that is taken very seriously. There was some local kid who illuminated a life flight helicopter and had a visit from the feds shortly thereafter. I never heard what happened to him, but I suspect purposely blinding a drone would not be a laughing matter.

      • village idiot says:

        Cain, you are able! I want one of those lasers. Do they destroy the optics on the drone, or just keep it from seeing you? Tell me where I can get one of them.

        • It won’t destroy or damage the optics of the drone. The laser will white out IR or wash out the signal sent back to the remote station to all blue or green depending on the laser. The wash out of bright color will certainly piss off the guys manning the drone.

          This laser isn’t cheap at $300 per unit. It is sold online at http://www.wickedlaser.com. This was marketed as the world’s first lightsaber last Christmas. It is bright enough that prolonged exposure will damage retina (putting it mildly).

          Unless you are not getting enough attention at home, at no point should you aim one at a helo or plane. The feds make house calls. They also advise against aiming them at satellites since this laser can reach space.

          If you have a helo snooping around your property I think this laser will be of little help since you obviously have a much larger issue at hand that .

      • maybe a 40 watt plasma rifle.

    • conmaze,
      If you’re expecting the novel Patriots to lead to something other than fantasy shoot-um-ups, you’ll be disappointed. It’s a fun read but has very little “prepping” info to offer in my opinion.

      • K Fields, My expectations were high, but am disappointed so far. Everyone that preps has read this book and it got such high accolades. I keep reading waiting to get to the good part! The only thing I’ve gotten so far is make sure I have enough coffee in my stores. I’ll keep reading it just because I’m stubborn!

        • Yes, I have read that book. The book offers some ideas for group prepping/living/defense, but not much in the way of individual prepping. Patriots is more about being story than it is a self help book on prepping.

          My suggestion is to take this book for what it is and see how your surroundings/situation would stack up against an event such as the one that happens in the book.

          I started reading the author’s blog this week. In many respects, the topics over there are similar to ones we see posted on MD’s site regarding prepping. The author tends to take things one step further than most do for prepping. Similar article contest over there that MD is running here. I find his site at certain points a bit more stressed/intense than MDs. (Yes, I understand trouble is coming and am doing my inadequate best to prepare, but damn you don’t have to give me the heebe jeebes about it) The author is of the mindset that there are only really 10 to 15 states west of the Missouri River that a prepper should be living in. He goes on to list reasons why, detailed, informational maps, linked articles, and researched posts showing one thing or another in support of his belief. I don’t think his site is as friendly as MD’s site is (just an initial impression. This opinion might change as I work my way further into the author’s site.)

          • Cain,

            I think you would like the post at the link below…Let me know what you think?

            http://www.thesurvivalistblog.net/redoubt-of-the-east/

            • Hi MD-
              Grr.. missed that post during the end of semester rush. I just finished reading it. No one mentions the Adirondacks of upstate NY… probably because it is cold, remote, and as desolate as many parts of Alaska. And with the gutting of the former American manufacturing system that once employed millions of upstaters, the population is way down from what it was just a couple of decades ago. People are leaving in droves, just to find jobs so that they and their families can stay off the welfare lines. But for families who have lived there for generations and know how to survive , the game is rich and small-scale family farming is possible if you know what to plant and when to plant it to take best advantage of the short growing season. Also, water is rarely a problem here – I’ve lived here most of my life, and my gardens can always survive on what I trap in rainbarrels. But anyone not used to real winter (with the exception of this year’s weird non-winter) should just stay home. Let the wood stove go out just one night during January or February, and there’s a chance you or your children just might not wake up.
              Risky, but climate is the region’s own best form of defense. After the first winter post SHTF, should be pretty much cleared-out with only a minimal period of high-alert.

            • I have traveled through TN along I75 and I40 many times. Nice country up there and a fun drive. I agree with your assessment. Since I75 and I40 would be principal refugee routes, I’d look for places with limited access that can be easily defended well away from those two highways and the eastern river valley of the state.

              If SHTF I do not see any location being truly safe. Some locations are better than others depending on what you are trying to avoid. I see most of the dangers to our survival will come from other’s human error or negligence.

              Nuclear war? Extremely remote at this point. EMP over the US is more likely with US foreign policy currently in place.

              Meltdown at a nuclear power plan? Unlikely. The plants operating inside the United States have numerous safety features built into them. They are suppose to automatically shutdown in event of an emergency. I realize things can go wrong for one reason or another. My sister told me how the nuke plant my sister trained on in New York for the Navy had a component in a secondary system installed backwards and had they flipped over to it, meltdown city. The whole thing was taken offline to fix the problem.

              Earthquake? Possible, greater likelihood than a nuclear attack.

              TN is in a tough spot though geographically speaking. Like most places in the United States, it is a pick your poison carefully and do the best with what you have. You have to contend with the nuclear power plant near Decatur , AL, two nuke plants in the highway 27 river valley, and the New Madrid fault line to the west, refugee exodus from the east, and possible seasonal flooding in the lower parts of the TN’s various river valleys. Should everything shutdown correctly and stay in that emergency status with the rods TN’s problem will be the refugees. Then again when was the last time you saw refugees act rationally?I could see them trying to break into the nuke plants looking for something to eat and shelter.

              • Cain,

                To be honest I don’t have to worry much about any of that at my TN location in the northern Cumberland Plateau. I’m far enough west and east of the nearest nuclear power plant threat area to be safe. At this point the nuclear power plants in the state are the least of my worries as is New Madrid fault line that will shake the western part of the state but we will not see any significant damage here on the mountains of the Cumberland Plateau in the east. Flooding were my retreat locates is nearly impossible.

                As for refugees as the post states “In a meltdown of the social order, by the time refugees get through the first mountain range and the numerous mountain rifts that confront them—before seeing the 1000 foot high Cumberland Plateau, they will be highly motivated to stay on the valley floor with its promise of food and civilization (the lure that keeps people on the march). There isn’t much agriculture on the plateau (though it is fine for growing garden crops) nor large communities so there is little draw for refugees to make the trek up those slopes. What highways do lead up to the plateau cut through steep valleys and gorges and are fairly easy to block off to restrict access”.

                Overall I think the “Redoubt Of The East” (the Tennessee Cumberland Plateau area) is just as good for a retreat location as the western states being promoted by JWR.

                • There will be pockets in the United States outside of the states/areas indicated by JWR that will carry on just fine. Yours will be one of them.

                  I wouldn’t rule out refugees moving through your area. Fear, hunger, and ignorance are all factors that could contribute as to why one or more refugee would end up in your area. You may hide your AO better than anyone else in your neighborhood. It doesn’t eliminate the possibility of someone wandering through it. When people get desperate, all bets are off.

                  Like a plague of locusts, emotionally desperate people are hard to predict where they will ultimately go. If an area has too many refugees in it, some will choose to continue move on. Once the obvious has been consumed and people get pushed out of their comfort zone again, that’s when I think we will see a second wave of trouble.

                  • arkieready says:

                    Nothing expensive this week. Building a chicken tractor with material purchased months ago. Made sourdough bread with a starter ive been cultivating a month or so. Yum. Made homemade dogfood to suppliment little black dog’s store bought. And sampled fresh greens (thinnings) oh yeah! Gathered old t-shirts for rags and cleaning patches. Today just enjoyed working in the sun! I’ve missed sunshine on my arms. Winter sux. My chickens enjoyed freedom this weekend. I got 2 dozen eggs today!
                    Thank you all for the helpful info here. Im comfortable enough to write stuff here (recluse if i could, but gotta work and stuff) md, you rock, as do all the folks who post here.

                • MD,
                  I think I would also prefer the general weather conditions and the water availability here in the east than out there in the west.

      • Harold Dean says:

        That is the reason why I like this site better than JWR. Comments are posted here that you can learn a lot from and it is not orientated to the constant bang, bang, shootemup scenario. I have commented to JWR a couple of times that I think survival is evading discovery as much as you can rather than confrontation and provoking a full scale war. The phrase MBR or Main Battle Rifle blows my mind. I have no use for such an instrument and would rather use sneaky pete tactics I learned many years ago rather than a direct confrontation. Harold

        • village idiot says:

          I’m like you, Harold Dean, I’m too old to put up much of a fight. I have one bad knee, and I just can’t run the way I used to. All my firearms are the rifles and pistols I grew up with, and even though I have two AR-15s, I bought them for my boys, one of whom is in the Army. I have an 1894 Marlin in .44 magnum for my general purpose rifle, and I carry a Model 629 .44 magnum with a 4-in barrel for my handgun, although I do have some .45s. I don’t figure I’ll make it too long anyway, but I want my kids to have as much stuff as I can save for them. That’s why I prep.

    • At a blog called Global Guerrillas there’s an ex(?)-intelligence guy named John Robb who keeps droning on and on about drones. Actually, it’s really interesting, I just had to say droning because. Anyway, one of his latest posts is these Harvard micro-robotics guys have invented a drone the size of a bee (that will fly like a bee with bee-like wings) that can be “printed” on laminated sheets, i.e. it’s like 15 layers of stuff, some metal some plastic etc., and each is die-cut a certain way, then the sheets are melded together, and the drones pop out like a pop-up book. This means basically the price of drones just went down an order of magnitude. Combine this with mobile fabrication labs, like those that can now do 3-D printing, and we’ll have billions of drones instead of 30,000 like the Pentagon was saying, and just about anyone could be printing them in the back of a truck.

      In a way it democratizes drones. Imagine the radar one would need to detect a bee sized drone. Now imagine a swarm of bee sized drones flying close to the ground like regular bugs do.

      I’m thinking maybe being underground (literally) might be one way to avoid this level of surveillance, although they could probably also make drones that burrowed.

    • ShadesOfGray says:

      conmaze,
      I’d be interested in any specific items you see disappearing. One explanation could be that they are seasonal. At the local Walmart I have noticed that ground turkey (1 pound “logs”) has often been in short supply or missing entirely. In addition, they used to carry two grades, similar to ground beef, 93/7 and 85/15. Now only the 85/15 ground turkey is offered. Of course the price has also increased about 20% during that time. Frozen broccoli florets are often short supply, too. If you need toothpaste or pain killers there is no lack of choices. Ammo shelves were wiped out at Christmas but have been well stocked since then.

    • Conmaze,

      Sorry, I just saw your post (area of sarasota)

      G.

    • Just because someone can Does Not mean someone will. 360 million Americans live in this country.

  16. MtWoman (N Central Texas) says:

    Only did a couple small things for preps this last week, as there was no $$ to buy anything, and my time was (and is) mostly taken up with looking for a new car insurance company, a new phone service provider, and setting up a long list of health screenings. Quite challenging, that. I’m also finally taking some direct action about my father… looking into some eldercare counseling to see what my options are.

    I managed the following prep stuff though:

    -re-inventoried food stash and improved my inventory lists, figuring out how many actual meals there are.

    -continuing to eliminate extra ‘stuff’: clothes that no longer fit given away; cut up old T-shirts into rags, donated some books & magazines I don’t use any more.

    -still preparing for my “emergency preparedness” talk for this community next week. That took me to the county EOC (Emergency Operating Center) to get more brochures and to pick up my CERT backpack. I’ve had to wait 4 months from when I graduated the course to get it…they want to make sure you are committed and not just there to get ‘stuff’. Certainly was worth the training & wait to get it; in it are: a hardhat, leather gloves, utility shut-off tool, crescent wrench, first-aid kit, lightsticks, flashlight & batteries, multi-tool, HUGE roll of duct tape, safety goggles, bright yellow CERT vest, emergency blanket, N95 masks, whistle, and an orange marking crayon. All of this of course is to be kept together for being “activated” to help in a county emergency, and is not intended for personal use. But, if there’s an emergency and I needed the stuff here at home, I wouldn’t hesitate to use it. I will use the backpack as “show-and-tell” during my presentation.

    -when I got the emergency info brochures for my talk, I also got a really good book called “Are You Ready?”, a publication from FEMA. I am reading through it, and it’s actually very good. Basic and easy to use…it lays out all the things us preppers know, but also tells what to expect from the local & fed folks…some good info to know.

    -and of course I’ve been reading as many posts and comments here on the SBlog (and on other blogs & sites) as I can, and copying the great info to word docs to be printed out. There is so much great info from all of you, it’s hard to keep up. In the circumstances I am in, I can’t get as prepared as most of you are. But that might change, so I want the info available.

    Thanks MD for this blog and your input. I especially like this weekly “what did I do” post…great way to track what I AM doing…and what I need to do more of.

    Keep on prepping, keep on prepping….and keep LOVE in your hearts.

    • George is Learning says:
      • MtWoman (N Central Texas) says:

        G is L….yes…this looks like the same info, even though it looks like a different edition…it’s probably an update. Still the same info though….

      • Thanks George, just did the same after you posted this.

    • MtWoman, congrats on the CERT training, let’s hope its not 4 months before they ask you to respond to an emergency lol.

      • MtWoman (N Central Texas) says:

        Thanks Jarhead, but I hope it’s MUCH LONGER than 4 months before an emergency!! I’d rather not EVER be called…that there never BE an emergency. But I am getting prepared just in case. This is a small county, with few possibilities of anything truly major. We could be called up for any of the things that could happen here: tornadoes, floods, chemical spills (big interstate runs through the county), radiation (plant close enough that if it broke down and melted, and the wind was the right direction, it COULD make it here), fire (especially this Summer after hardly any rain this winter), or water contamination, which happened a couple years ago (don’t know how or why). Or we could be called to a neighboring county for helping with other disasters.

        I still struggle with being involved in CERT, as it’s run by HS. But in the situation I’m in, I decided that the payoff was a good thing to go for. The current training we’re in is about PODs…”Point of Dispension”, which is about dealing with possible health hazards. We could be called up to dispense meds in the case of an outbreak of some kind, which means we would be considered on the same level as 1st responders, and have the info before the masses and a first crack at the meds. That could be a good thing. And we always have the ability to turn down the call-up, and stay with family.

        So…I hang in there and get what I can out of it. :)

        • MtWoman, I meant that it takes them 4 months to call you sort of like Katrina lol government bureaucracy.
          Again congratulations on your training. I know our County FD has CERT training, it makes me want to look in to our city.

    • Mt. Woman,

      Getting the CERT backpack wasn’t just a small thing. Congratulations on completing the course and getting the backpack.

      • MtWoman (N Central Texas) says:

        Thanks Gayle. It would be nice if I never had to use it, but I’m not planning on that. I am grateful for it…and the training and the connection with the county EOC. In my situation (alone with my aging father) it’s a good thing. Next is a Red Cross 1st aid/CPR training.

        I decided yesterday to tell my 1/2 sister (my father’s eldest from my step-mother) about my 72-hour box and the cat’s BOB and the lists I have on the wall in my room about what to grab if there’s a need to BO. She was visiting and it just seemed like the right thing to do for my father and the cat, in case she’s here and I’m not. It felt strange to share that info, as I’ve kept it to myself so far, but whatever…it’s done now. She saw my CERT pack and was curious and so I just got into telling her. Don’t know why I’m sharing this…?? Whatever…it’s early and no coffee yet. In fact I’m doing a fast from coffee this week…yikes…so I could be a little ‘weird’. Weird”er”? :)

        • MtWoman , any class you can. Take helps. I made my sister and her fiancé take a CPR adult/child class because my nephew was 4 months away. Fast forward two years and a nephew falling in the pool. The class saved my nephew.

          Give up coffee? Never! I couldn’t do it.

        • Copperhead says:

          Mt Woman NCentral Texas,
          I am POD trained and took the refresher training this last December. My county is supposed to have CERT and I let them know I was interested, but have never heard from them. We have so few volunteers for POD and surrounding counties have none that we have been told we will be assigned to them, too, if something comes up.
          You didn’t say how your 1/2 sister reacted? Is she o.k. with it?
          I, too, plan to take the Red Cross course this summer. Why no coffee?

  17. Not really a prep, but a result of prepping. Got stuck in a 4hr’ back up on I75 due to a fatal crash. Couldn’t make a u turn as banking to steep for my civic and was no available u turn area where I sat. I did have my get home bag on the front seat, so enjoyed a hot meal, flavored water, some candy while I waited with a full tank of gas (I never let it get below 1/2) and my favorite sirrus xm stations. Couldn’t help thinking of how many folks were hungry, thirsty or running out of gas. Also one more reason to stay off hiways when shtf. keep heater meals in that bag as no fire/water needed to prepare.

    • riverrider says:

      nw, nice feeling ain’t it:)

    • nwohio, good use of your get home bag. For the colder weather and travel I have a nice little car heater the plugs into the cigarette lighter and can be mounted on the dash or a window bracket place it on like the old drive in theater and roll the window up. This way you don’t burn fuel for heat.
      Its an American Red Cross brand/trademark.

      • Jarhead,
        Do those heaters have some sort of voltage cutoff so you don’t drain your car battery too far when using them? Sounds like a great idea if they do.

        • K, I’ve only used it a few times for those cold winter nights after one too many drink enough to warm the car without putting the keys in the ignition and warm enough to slide in the sleeping bag or blanket. If it got cold again I would plug it in long enough to warm it back up.

          Sounds bad but I still get out to concerts and if I tie one on to hard I have never risked a DUI by even putting the keys in the ignition so that was my original purpose for buying it lol. It hasn’t been cold enough to break it out but I will dig it out of my BOB and find out.

          • MtWoman (N Central Texas) says:

            Jarhead…I’d love to know more about this heater…

          • robert in mid michigan says:

            depending on the state but here in michigan if you have had a few to many adult beverages and yoou are in the car and have access to the ignitioon key it is considered drunk driving. lock the ignition key in the trunk, put in the engine compartment and only keep the door key with you. know two people who got dui’s for this.

            study the law it is thier to screw you in a lot of ways most of us do not expect.

            • I have heard of people washing there car int eh driveway and drinking beer. They have there car steroe on and wind up getting a dui because the key is in the ignition in the on possition.The person is not even in the car. Welcome to Komradfornia .

        • K fields and MtWoman: its on Amazon.com under American Red Cross ARC1006 Auto Heater/Defroster.

          I took mine out to test it last night and it provides enough heat to defrost the immediate area and its good for warming up the hands. Took about 10 minutes to feel it going. No auto cut off btw just an on and off switch.

          It was in the 50s last night (or felt it with a light wind) so its not designed to warm the whole vehicle and I used it in my 4 door mid-sized 2010 car. Doing a bit of research since throwing away the directions years ago it said to use caution in smaller cars with lower output from the lighter may not work. Mine is a 4 cylinder and it works. I guess those with hybrids are out of luck lol.

          It didn’t warm up the whole vehicle like the car heater but I felt it, it did warm up my hands (those cold regions you know the cold going through the windshield its nice to have pointed at the steering wheel to warm the hands while the defroster works on the windshield. If you wanted to leave it in there say 20 minutes pointed at the windshield to defrost while you get ready in the morning while getting ready for work or at night before leaving work or while shopping at the store without killing the battery. Next test is to see if it keeps it warm while I go into Walmart lol.

      • Another good heater for the car that won’t potentially drain your battery consists of a #10 can with 6-10 holes around the bottom (I use a standard old style beer/pop can opener, sometimes called a church key). Place several (3-5) small votive candles in the bottom and light them. Make sure you crack a window enough to allow some fresh air. When not in use you can store candles, lighter or matches, space blanket, and other supplies (like hard candy) in the can and use a snap on plastic lid to keep the contents inside.

      • Those things keep your windows clear also, nice for old drafty trucks and things like that.

  18. MtWoman (N Central Texas) says:

    I should add that the FEMA book give BASIC info, not anything about long-term prepping. Just wanted to clarify that.

  19. This week I have been getting prepared for a possible snow storm in our area. The normal grocery shopping, making sure our winter clothing is ready; boots, hats, gloves, etc. I also have been surfing pinterest looking for good organized food storage sites and new blogs to read. I have found quite a few new ones and added them to my blog. Also I just posted all the details of how I prepare for a winter storm.

    Better to be safe than sorry. Have a great week!

    • Only Me,

      I like your blog. I bookmarked it. I haven’t seen snow in 20 years. The picture you have up makes me want snow–highly unlikely, as we have temps in the 70s.

      • Kate in GA says:

        Gayle,

        IMHO not seeing snow in 20 years is a good thing! It snowed here 3 times last winter. When I moved from NY, I said I never wanted to see snow again. I need to go farther south!

        My idea of prepper clothing is a tee shirt and flip flops.

  20. offshore day says:

    thanks to MD for having this blog full of information and a place to exchange ideas.

    slow week for me, stopped at an estate sale and got an assortment of DIY books for free, woodworking, plumbing, electrical, concrete, gardening , appliance repair and other fixit books. Also got a boxful of various hand tools and hooks/holders that go on a pegboard. What I’ve noticed at these sales, if they are being run by the “commercial” estate sale outfits, they appear to bring in a lot of their own wares to display and hope the traffic generated will boost sales of their own goods versus what is really from the estate being liquidated. Also prices are inflated. When the actual family is runing the sale, I have much better luck negotiating especially on the last day. Got my eye on a small shed at a sale near my house that is way overpriced, but tomorrow is the last day and will try to drive a hard bargain if its still there.

    More time spent on cleaning up fall/winter garden for the spring summer season. Broccoli, chard, carrots, garlic, and snow peas still going but broc/peas slowing down.

  21. Hello Wolf Pack! I’m a long-time reader but first-time poster on this blog. I’ve probably always been a prepper, although I didn’t know that’s what it was called when I was five years old and helping my mother make a boatload of baloney sandwiches to sustain the neighbors who would likely invade our home–the only one in the neighborhood with a basement—when a severe storm was predicted and tornadoes about to hit. To supplement my sandwich-making job, I was also put in charge of gathering all the family flashlights (which were many) into a centralized spot and checking all the batteries. Heavy responsibility for a five-year-old!

    Now, of course, my prepping efforts involve much more than baloney sandwiches. I have a laundry room full of nonperishable foods, toilet paper, and toothpaste that my grown children lovingly refer to as being “for the zombies.” We are slowly but surely getting debt paid off, in an effort to be debt-free by 2015 (**insert plug for Dave Ramsey here**). My DH and I are exploring options for a water supply beyond just filling two-liter bottles and hoping it will be “enough,” whatever that may be.

    But it is hard, and sometimes harder. One grown daughter moved back home in October to live with us after a period of addiction, jail time, and recovery. She is doing well now, although it is a process with an occasional step backwards that must be dealt with in a healthy, non-enabling way. Our other grown daughter is currently in a drug and alcohol rehab program and doing very well. She is scheduled to get out in late March or early April and will also move back home to live, at least for the time being. It would be easy for us as the parents to beat ourselves up over our children’s poor choices and the consequences that have followed, including custody of our precious granddaughter being given to her father who lives 60 miles away.

    But I say all of this to say that it is only through God’s strength that we have been able to put one foot in front of the other and to know that He has a plan for all of us. While our prepping has, out of necessity, taken a back seat from time to time, it is moving forward when we have the ability to focus on anything beyond simply holding our family together.

    This blog has been a true God-send to me throughout the months I have been reading it. I feel like many of the regular contributors are at this point personal friends and miss them when they are gone (come back, Lint, we miss you!).

    There may be weeks when I simply am unable to contribute due to other issues at home that have stolen my focus. But then, being the gabby, preachy person I am, there may be weeks when I blog your collective arm off. Bear with me, Wolf Pack. I’m new at this blogging business and will do the best I can!

    • welcome to the family mamabetsy!

    • MtWoman (N Central Texas) says:

      MamaBetsy….welcome! I am a newbie here myself, but it didn’t take long to feel at home.

      I understand the pressure of holding family together, and dealing with your daughters’ addiction and other issues. I send you strength to handle it. And kudos to you for doing what’s needed. :)

    • mamabetsy, welcome to the family!

      • MamaBetsy:
        Welcome to the Pack! May God Bless You for your efforts.
        (My grandson is the light of my days despite the stuff his
        Mom put me through to get here.) Cos

    • Texas Nana says:

      Welcome, Mama Betsy!! Glad to have you posting, hope you enjoy!

    • Mama Betsy,

      Welcome to the Wolf Pack. To flip the issue with children and addiction, note that few addicts and alcoholics ever seek help. The fact that your kids did shows that you’ve set a good example for them.

    • Welcome. The regulars to this site are a good bunch.

    • Copperhead says:

      Welcome, MamaBetsy! This is a wonderful group. Hope we hear more from you. (p.s. we even accept rants from time to time!)
      Blessings!

    • Hi MamaBetsy! Welcome… none of us is a stranger to blogging till your arm falls off. Seems we take turns doing that around here.
      Cat

    • MamaBetsy⁠, welcome to the Pack! Any of us are willing to answer questions, just ask and if we don’t know the answer someone does or some of us will help research it for you.

    • Hunker-Down says:

      MamaBetsy,

      We walked do that road. You said a key thing, “it is a process with an occasional step backwards that must be dealt with in a healthy, non-enabling way”. It sounds like you know the drill; don’t be an enabler, don’t provide 3 hots and a cot, let ‘em hit bottom (safely).

      Welcome to the Wolf Pack and remember, we like prepper questions.

      • Yes, like Hunker-Down says, we like prepper questions–such questions allow us to pontificate, debate and instigate.

    • mama betsy…welcome – I am continually amazed at the resilience of so many posters, you included…

      we are all just ordinary people, who are prepping, and share our journey…warts and all…

      continued strength and good fortune – with your children, paying off debt and prepping….your story is similar to many.

      Looking forward to hearing from you again, and the steps along your prepping journey. cheers.

    • granny mae says:

      Mama Betsy,
      I too am new to blogging on here but have been a reader for a while. I share your problems with children with drug adictions. Been living with that one for over 35 years now. I have a son that struggles with it and he too is up for a while and then down again and had to deal with everything that goes with that problem. Trust in God and just take each day as it comes but don’t be a pushover. I think all parents go through that for a while until someone in the know finally tells them if you don’t stand your ground they will die. So now we stand our ground, but boy is that hard sometimes ! They fight it best when they want to beat it the most and only they can do it, you cannot do it for them. I will keep you in my prayers, God Bless

    • Welcome to the Pack MamaB! I am somewhat new and have learned a great deal from this awesome group. I hope you find it useful too.

    • Repair Mama says:

      MamaBetsy,
      From one Mama to another, welcome.
      We like it when you “Blog” our arms off!
      Good friends are the spice of life. I hope you enjoy this site as much as I do.
      Pull up a chair and type away!!

      • Thanks so much to everyone for their words of welcome and support. DD #1 just got a full-time job waitressing (her career of choice) this morning. The judge for her legal case in this county happened to be there eating lunch, actually recognized her, and told her how proud of her he was. What a boost for her morale! Prayers of the faithful are what gets us through to the brighter side.

        Found 29-oz canned pumpkin this weekend at Sams over the weekend for $2.29 for a THREE-pack! Got two packs–6 cans–for less than a dollar a can, and put them all in my “Zombie Stash.” Hey, pumpkin is very healthy, and it tastes pretty good, too! Better yet, they don’t expire until December 2014! OK, Wolf Pack, got any recipe ideas (besides the obvious pies, cookies, bread)? I’m thinkin something like pumpkin casserole (ewww) or pumpkin sandwiches (double-ewww). Ya’ll will have to be creative, cause I’m not!

        • Judy, another one says:

          Have you tried pumpkin spring rolls?
          http://www.cooks.com/rec/view/0,184,158172-249206,00.html

        • MamaBetsy, congrats to DD #1 on her new position.

          As for the canned pumpkin, have you ever tried it in a soup? It’s delicious with black beans, evaporated milk and a touch of cumin and chilipowder, and I’ve also heard of pumpkin soups flavored with curry or with pumpkin pie spices.

          • Yes, I’ve heard of pumpkin soup, just never tried it! I’ll have to convince hubby to let me try something NEW for a change. He’s one of those who like the same ol’ things for dinner every night. I’m blessed, though, because he’ll eat anything, including veggies and leftovers. He just gets nervous when I get out the recipe book. I’ll have to try both the spring rolls and the soup!

            • I would be making me some pumpkin pie. I have tried a pumpkin-mung bean mix. It was just okay. But nutritionally, it was a powerhouse.

        • On her last litter my dog had 11 pups. Nursing that many pups had her to skin and bones, despite a feeder of premium dog food and an allways full bowl of puppy chow. I would serve her milk gravy made with half and half and infant vitimin drops. But the the one thing she would eat every drop of was pumpkin custard over rice. Just a pumpkin pie filling with extra infant vitimin drops mixed with steamed rice. My chillins would kid me that her food just need nutmeg to pass as a desert. The eggs, cream and pumpkin got her through till all the pups got adopted Xmass eve. Pumpkin alone is a good dog food for those with diarrhea. Half of my long term dog food storage is the canned and dried makings of that custard, add wheat berries and parched corn and my long term dog chow is at about three years.

  22. Texas Nana says:

    WOW!!!! 17,860 readers!!!
    What’s that say about MD? You have a great sight, you put a lot of work into it and the biggest part to me is, the wolf pack gets to make comments!! Congrats!!!

    What did we do this week?
    Canned 23 quarts of pasta sauce with ground beef, celery, onions, mushrooms, total cost per quart $2.03 including the cost of a canning flat. I found 3 #10 cans of tomato strips, waited till I found marked down ground beef, then added the fixing. Not bad, all we have to add is pasta, to have a complete meal. If it’s just DH & me each quart will make 3 meals, 2 with pasta, 1 will be home made pizza. If family show up we can always add a salad or other fruit and veggies from the garden or the stores.
    We ran the generator, put a load on it checked for any problems, everything running smooth, FIL, has his generator running on a weekly schedule just because it’s new and he is still checking everything over to make sure he’s happy. So far so good!! Love it when a plan comes together.
    Serviced our diesel fueled heater.
    Inventoried our stores, working on a list of item we feel we are short on.
    My dad came home from 7 days of rehab, mom got some rest, hospice can the day after to do an assessment. They feel that my dad is getting around “to go” for them to come in at this time, but they have all his medical info. The next time dad has a “spell” mom can call hospice instead of 911. Sounds like a plan to me.

    I have a special request, we have a couple that attend our church, their 2 year old niece has been diagnosed with a form of leukemia called Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). This is a disease that usually occurs in men over 60. She is the second youngest person to be diagnosed with this. Fortunately, it is a controllable condition with light chemotherapy, but only completely curable with a successful bone marrow transplant. Until that occurs, she will be on this “light” chemotherapy for the rest of her life.
    Compounding this, she has severe pnuemonia in her left lung. This was not detected by listening to her breath, nor was it detected by xray. A CT scan on Monday revealed the seriousness of it. They still have not identified the type of pneumonia, but are hopeful to identify the strain in the next day or 2 so that they can treat it appropriately. In the short term, the pnuemonia is the most concerning of the two. It makes her feel horrible with its high fever and coughing.
    This couple had a son that was still born a few years ago, so you can see they have had a road block or two along the way. They do have two sons that are about 10 & 8 years old. Please keep these folks and their children in your prayers, specially their little girl.
    Thanks to the Wolf Pack, ya’ll inspire me daily, some of ya’ll write great articles, some make great comments, but all of ya’ll inspire me!!!
    Keep up the great job you are doing each and everyone of you, specially MD, thanks again for everything you do, I appreciate YOU!!!
    Keep the faith and keep on prepping

    • texasnana, will keep your friends in my prayers.

    • Texas Nana,

      When using spaghetti sauce for pizzas, try adding a bit of catsup (and basil and marjoram, if you have it)–that makes the pizza sauce just a bit sweeter.

      My citric acid arrived in the mail this afternoon. So I will make up a batch of mozzarella cheese tomorrow. If you know how to make mozzarella, you can eat pizza at the end of the world. Here’s the recipe for dough, if anyone is interested:

      Dissolve yeast in very warm water. Add a bit of sugar (or brown sugar, depending on your taste). Add a pinch of salt and some olive oil. Add 3 cups flour. Stir. Kneed in more flour. Let rise for 30 or so minutes.

      I cook mine on a pizza stone. I precook the crust for 10 minutes. Then add homemade pizza sauce (canned tomatoes, catsup, basil, marjoram, and garlic–blended) and cooked until sufficiently thickened. Then add whatever toppings you have on hand. (Left over bbq pork is really good on pizza.)

    • Copperhead says:

      Texas Nana,
      Prayers will be said for your friends. Hope that little girl can get her bone marrow transplant.

      • Texas Nana says:

        Thanks for everyone’s prayers, these are good Christian folks who are asking for nothing but your prayers.
        Thanks again

    • Texas Nana, prayers sent. Have they put her on the list for marrow donor yet? There are a lot of good people out there willing to, I also understand family os the best odds for donor, I would suggest everyone check and see. A send prayer is sent for a match.

      On an up side note the pasta sauce sounds real good!

    • Hunker-Down says:

      Texas Nana,

      We will pray for the little one and her family.

    • wow, texas nana…that is tough…seeing young children so sick…makes we appreciate my and my family’s good health so much.

      Am honoured to be able to send prayers for their little girl…

      Whenever I read/hear about sick children…really brings it home to me to just take things easy…that right now people are already overloaded with enough stress, keeping their kids alive and seeing doctors when necessary…let along adding preps and rising cost of living into the mix.

      • Texas Nana says:

        For those who ask Nory Mae is having a bone marrow test on Monday, our understanding is she or will be on the list by Monday or Tuesday. Her pneumonia is not responding very well so far, more test are being done. Please continue to keep this little one in your prayers.
        Thanks

    • Prayers coming for that precious little one. A young girl at our church, age 16, has the same thing, though it is very rare. We are all considering shaving our heads so we will look like her. Sniff.

    • TexasNana – Our nephew had a bone marrow transplant at age 5 for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL). He is now 30. It is not an easy thing to do. My thoughts go out to this little girl and her family.

  23. First I’d like to start by welcoming the many new people I’ve seen posting. Welcome you to the Pack!

    The Wolf Pack is like a family in that on occasion we may disagree on how to prep, method of canning, firearms (for/against/make/caliber) etc. but the focus is to help each other prepare for what’s around to corner be it nature, man made or economic. Agree or disagree we are here to help each other, especially the new members looking to start prepping or refine their prepping.

    It was a busy week at work and prepping thanks to some over time and good fortune. Those asking for prayers (sent) and those recovering from ill health keep getting better!

    My Preps for the week
    Medical:
    1 Laceration tray kit
    1 Suture removal kit
    2 Suture stapler kits w staples
    2 Staple removal kits
    1 case Iodine Prep packs
    1 case of wound irrigation bottles.
    Assorted bandages, gauze, tape and stretch gauze.

    Friend’s DW is an RN at a clinic and asked if my gf could bake a red velvet cake last minute for her daughters b-day. When asked how much I jokingly said any medical stuff she could get me. Said it was stuff from a vendor rep. Wasn’t expecting it so I paid my gfs cell phone bill for her.

    Food Prep:
    2 cases of peaches (1 for office)
    2 cases pears (1 for office)
    1 case pineapples
    1 case clam chowder soup (for office
    1 case chicken noodle soup
    2 boxes cereal
    1 lb black pepper uncrushed
    20 lb sugar
    10 canned chicken
    1 lb dehydrated onions
    Powdered Coffee Creamer
    2 large containers of instant coffee
    2 peanut butter (its expensive)
    1 loaf of bread (for the office)

    Water Prep:
    Filled 3 2L bottles with water
    1 case of water
    2 five gallon water cans (given to me in trade for cleaning a few guns) cleaned and filled
    Realized I could use more water.

    Gun Show Sunday! Have a great week Wolf Pack!

    • Jarhead 03, GREAT SCORE on the medical preps! I find it funny that folks in Kalifornia don’t know how to clean weapons.
      (I’ve cleaned some for trusted friends and coworkers too.)
      I broke a friend from works M1 into individual parts and he
      asked “Do you know how to put it back together?!” ROTFL
      My only prep this week was to buy a couple of Coleman lanterns
      with free shipping, Thanks to the person who gave us the Code!
      Regarding good show, is there a GunShow this weekend? Cos

      • Cosmo, you will like this Jarhead story lol:
        Just before getting promoted to Sergeant the Division General walked in to the HQ office where I was the Training NCO for schools, combat training and annual PFT among other things.
        The General asks any of you warriors grunts, I was the only one in an office full of desk jockeys. He asked if I knew what a 1903, Sharps, M1 Garand,/carbine/Thompson, M3, BAR and M14 were. I said yes sir, I’ve shot all but the Sharps and BAR but was familiar with their functioning. There were some muzzle loaders, 1911 and old single action revolvers as well.

        He said come with me I have a project for you. I volunteered myself to clean weapons the general had requisitioned from the National Armory for the Divisions Marine Corps Ball. I had a blast removing cosmoline that had been packed from 40 to over 100 years old.

        A few days after the Ball the General threatened me with a Navy Commendation (I refused a medal for cleaning rifles) but he recalled I had never shot the BAR or Sharps he asked if I wanted to hit the range and get some before he has to return them. I had a blast firing that BAR and the full auto Thompson and M3. He didn’t want to touch the Sharps on the range. I was the low man on the totem pole of Nam Vet warriors. He told the Sergeant Major shooting the 1903 “how does it feel having the rifle you used in boot camp in your hands” and the Sgt Major said “good sir I didn’t see the Sharps you had in OCS sir”.

        Funny because those crusty warriors I had never seen a smile on their face before that day. You know the only time they smiled was when something bad was going to happen smile.
        Figured you’d enjoy that.

        • Thanks Jarhead! Simply a great story.
          Sorry I didn’t get your message yesterday. Spent the
          afternoon/evening trying to organize. I think it’ll take me
          forever and a wake-up.

      • Cosmo, Ontario gun show (crossroads of the West) if you make it out there let me know. I have to get there early and leave by 12:30 at the latest, I start work at 2 so its get in, get some and get out lol.

    • riverrider says:

      j, good luck at the show. impressive week of preps too!

      • River, thanks! I have been looking at preps other than firearms. The NatGeo show doesn’t have anything to do with it, I just think with all the weird weather it could be a hot summer so water is at the top of my list.

        I woke up to the water flowing a bit weak out of the faucet so I used the water stored in the Brita container for my morning coffee and had the water from the shower was weak as well. Turned out a water pipe cracked down the street, lucky no sink hole that I know of.

        I have access to 5 gallon bottles from the water delivery service at work. Only if an emergency occurs. I can load up quite a few in my car or SUV if SHTF lol

        • Jarhead,

          Be careful with loss of water pressure. I interviewed a water specialist back when I was a reporter. The guy said that all water pipes have small cracks. It is the pressure in the pipes that keeps the water safe to drink–high pressure makes the water leak out of any cracks in the pipes. As pressure decreases, contaminants from the dirt surrounding the pipes seeps in. And the water can become contaminated.

          • A garden hose lying in a puddle away from your house can turn into a siphon and pull that puddle and all contaminates back into the main. When low pressure is detected treat the water as nonpotable till the line gets flushed out. Just to be on the safe side.

            • Azyogi,

              Newer houses at least here in Florida are required to have “back flow preventers”. Now I know why.

    • Great food and water preps Jarhead! I feel I can never get enough water either. I purchased a 55 gallon plastic container last year and keep it in the garage. I had some curious looks from snoopy neighbors. Even with that and my Berkey filtration system I just don’t feel there will never be enough. The new property I bought does have a well on it. I will be picking up a tri-fuel generator in the near future in the event the grid goes down on that. Also check to see if there is a stream or other water source near by that you get gather water and use your filter system. Great story on the waepons you shared as well.

  24. Good day shopping I picked a roll of 1/2 dollars 40% silver and I put a Russian SKS on layawy. Also got to help my Dad look at a couple of pistols for him to carry.
    Got a bunch of Cold remedies from the Dollar store and extra dog food for storage.

    • Jamie, enjoy the SKS, I’ve had mine since I was 18. I’ve had so many fond memories I could never part with it. Its fun for target and the ballistics with soft point ammo is close to a 30-30 if you plan on hunting with it.

      • I bought a sks for my son 3 or 4 years ago.It was a yugo I think.He got a couple of speeding tickets and had to sell it to pay off fines.It was a fun little rifle. They are getting way to expensive now, at least in my part of Calif.It would make a nice deer and pig rifle in my area.His would go into full auto sometimes and that was spooky yet fun.

    • charliebuck69 says:

      Jamie,you will love the SKS! I picked a 1958 Romanian some years back,and I am glad I did!The gun functions perfectly,and shoots any ammo I feed it,without a hiccup.Now I am in the process of rounding up some spare parts,springs etc.Maybe Jarhead and other Pack members can steer me in the direction as to what to get,springs,gas piston,bolt? Thanks guys.Stay low and watch your back.GOD BLESS AMERICA!!!

  25. Hi Wolfpack-
    I purchased a hand-crank grinder to make grain for my homemade breads, and spent Thursday evening with an elderly friend learning to spin wool from her sheep and also how to set up a tabletop loom to weave the yarn.
    Looking around my local farm distributors for good sources of whole grains to grind into flour, but have found most in blends. Not that I’m against multi-grain bread, but I’d like to be able to choose which grains go in it!
    Anyway… good prep week.

    • Oh.. also picked up
      25 lbs sugar
      10 lbs honey
      4 small LED windup-charge flashlights for my family’s BOBs
      10 pks tealights
      1 pr Size 12 hiking boots for my eldest son, $2.5o from Thrift Store, tags still on them!
      4 pr work gloves (thrift store again 25 cents each!)
      bone ring & peg game
      mancala board
      little wooden/magnetic chess board
      (these last three to prove to my boys that it is possible to have fun without electricity)

      I’m in the process of making BOBs for my boys, with their help. It’s been amusing what they feel they couldn’t live without! We do go backpacking together frequently in the summer, so they have plenty of experience doing without electronics, but long term is something entirely different. Their traumatized faces when I asked them to imagine it and think what they would want to have… Oh my! Wish I’d had my camera on hand.

    • alikaat⁠, did you see Doomsday Prepper? One of the families had their hand crank wheat grinder attached with a belt to a bicycle that their daughter would peddle to spin the grinder and thereby grind the wheat.
      Pretty good idea, thought I’d pass it on.

      • Hi Jarhead-
        No, I don’t get the Nat Geo channel. Only basic cable for this family!
        The bike sounds like a fun way to make a laborious chore much easier, but prepping in my family is of necessity a very quiet and underground thing. My DH comes from an old, politically-connected family and he does not in any way support my prepping. Thinks I’m an absolute kook, and misses no opportunity to point it out to anyone when I happen to mention something ‘prepper-like’ that I am doing. Which happens more often lately, as I find most of my hobbies involve relearning old skills not often practiced any more by modern, main-stream people (like my DH). Makes me feel very betrayed, but I do not change my course. An exercise bike attached to a grinder would be entirely too visible an item to go unnoticed, and is guaranteed to be dismantled and in the junkyard (along with my new grinder) by week’s end. Instead, I pursue practical arts as simply an extension of my enthusiasm for things I was taught by my very much loved and sadly missed grandparents. He respects my love for them, and leaves alone anything I can connect to a story of my time spent with them as a child. That is my defense. Other things – like my gardening, downspout rainbarrels and homemade breads, pizzas made with homemade cheese, making almost everything from scratch, vacations taken backpacking in the mountains rather than expensive flights to Disney or the Tropics – are just practical, and save serious money over options he (and his silly family) would normally choose. He just shrugs and lets me be ‘quirky’ because he can’t change me (not for lack of trying!) and knew I was ‘a weird science-type’ before he married me! It also clears me of the ‘gold-digger’ accusations that many other spouses in his family are accused of. There are very ugly family dynamics when there is money involved. My family and I truly would be happier if it all just evaporated (as it just might!). I’d expect most of them to be among the first casualties of a collapse. HOW DO WE HEAT OUR ENORMOUS McMANSION WITHOUT POWER? WHAT TO DO WITHOUT OUR IPHONES AND BIG SCREEN TVS? OH MY! Poetic justice, in my mind.
        So… coming into my home, you’d never know I am a prepper. Everything is very clean and uncluttered, everything in its place, everything has a space. Such a practical device would never survive in the environment I have to live with.
        If I can survive it, it just may be the best OPSEC that anyone can possibly get… being married to an anti-prepper who publicly and openly scorns practicality.

        • Wow alikaat. Sounds like op sec from your husband is key.

          • Yes, but I am blessed with some very dear friends who are all preppers, and the great people on site, where for the most part, I am not judged by my inconsistencies. I am aware that I do not fit the typical demographic of a ‘prepper’… but that does not change the fact that in my heart, I have been one my entire life.
            Thank you, MD and all of the Wolfpack for being willing to put up with me. Posting here and reading all of your ideas and solutions ever week keeps me motivated, thinking clearly, and focused on what I need to do to make sure my family is safe and prepared for what is very slowly unfolding before our eyes.
            Cat

            • alikaat:
              I’m sorry to hear your spouse is like mine. My sons are 19 and 20 now. The one who is at College had a
              power outage. He was the only one of 4 roommates
              with multiple MagLites. LOL. He’s starting to see I’m
              not totally unbased w/ reality. Hang in there Lady! The times are changing faster than ever in my life. Cos

            • Thank you for all of your great stories, advice, and moral support. It does mean so much to me that there are many here who have faced similar challenges who have continued doing what they feel is so very important.
              I may just rent a storage unit for material preps. There is a facility very near my home that might work well. Thank you, Jarhead for that idea!
              Have a good evening, All.
              Cat

            • AliKaat. Don`t worry about being judged you will not be judged here.Don`t worry about demographics iether, I am just a typical white person clinging to my guns, and bible and fear people who do not look like me. According to our komrad in chief.

        • granny mae says:

          I know just where you are coming from. For a long time I had to hide my preping too. The problem is I was preping way back when preping wasn’t cool ! I have been at it for years. I even went so far as to buy thin totes that fit under the beds without being seen and I would leave my stash in the car in the garage until hubby went to sleep and then bring it in and stash it in the totes under the beds in the spare bedrooms etc. This went on for years without him knowing until one day for some reason he went looking for something and came across some of my stash ! There was a very big, very loud confrontation. I won ! He is not stupid, and knows that we can either live harmoniously together or he can be very miserable. He backed off and I continued and he kept grumbling, untill today ! In the past few years he has come to see the light and is now a willing helper. Don’t give up !

          • Granny Mae,

            I do not know what is happening but my dh has come on board too. I think people are looking around seeing the prices on things in the grocery store and getting scared. There’s only so much manufacturers can shrink packages before folks start to take notice.

        • Mother Earth says:

          Alikaat, I feel your pain. My dh doesn’t support my prepping either. He does seem a little more accepting as time goes on so there is always hope!

        • Alikaat,
          I know exactly what you’re going through, as I, too, am a “kook”. I’ve been teased about my preps for years now by DH. I get a sense of satisfaction everytime he needs something that I happen to have handy in my pocket or purse.
          Speaking of old skills, I recently found a listing on Craigslist, where someone in my area was making and selling spinning wheels and they give free lessons in their use when you buy one…including the cleaning and spinning of alpaca hair from their alpaca farm. Given the price of yarn nowadays, I’m seriously interested in this.

          • Cool. Thanks for the tip! Wonder if I could pass a spinning wheel as ‘enthusuasm’ or ‘science geekiness’…
            :)
            Cat

          • Cruzette, Alikaat,

            Watched a woman spin all weekend at a gun show. She had a portable spinning wheel that she had bought but said that she makes and sells drop spinning wheels. Here is her link:
            http://www.spinatude.etsy.com

            • Thanks for the link, Papabear! I’d completely forgotten about those types of spinners. Something that size would be easy to take with in a SHTF situation.

        • Repair Mama says:

          Alikaat,
          I have a simular problem here in my house, except we dont have a well off extended family. No mcmansions here, but my DH does not have a Prepper mindset. He is very vocal about his disaproval. “The damn world is not coming to an end!” is what he has said on quite a few occasions. He does not like the clutter in the house, and thinks I am a hoarder.
          I have to hide purchases and prep items. He grew up in this rual area, the son of a coal miner. His dad was in his 50′s when he was born, and he is the youngest of 12 children. He talks about life as a child and how they went hungrey a lot as kids. The parents would put dinner on the table and leave the room because there was not enough to go around so they would not eat. just the kids.
          I would love any advice or suggestions that you have on hiding items and keeping it quiet from the one that you love.
          I do hoard up pocket change and small bills that I can. I have some silver hid that I purchased a couple of years ago.
          I have food stashed in a few of the upstairs bedroom closets, and I just hope that he does not find it, cause we would be fighting. We are practical people, but he does not see the train wreck that is coming. I cant even get a gun. I can shoot, and have quite a bit in the past. Security worries me though. I do have lots of wasp sprays and did think of purchasing a stun gun or tazer.
          I don t have a grain grinder, but I do can. I love knowing what is in my food and weather it has been handled properly.

          Maybe we can help each other with our particular problems.
          Thanks in advance for anything you can offer
          Take care

          • Hi Repair Mama-
            I wondered if we had more in common than met the eye. I’ve been watching your posts, and many of your stories sound like I could have written them. Right down to having rebuilt engines in your teens. Knowing how to do things for yourself tends to leave a mark on people. Perhaps right down to living similar lives with similar spouses (who perhaps like having strong, capable partners who do not need to be taken care of? Just an idea I’ve had.)
            Maybe start by turning those hoarded small bills and coins into silver. That is easy to hide, and not so expensive that what little bit you put together will not buy anything. And after bad things start to happen, silver will be useable to purchase what you cannot do now. I’ve been doing just that for a bunch of years, and have found some really ingenious places and ways to hide it. DH has no idea, and if he did find some, he wouldn’t question it – he already knows I’m a kook!
            I took Jarhead’s advice and went this morning to the storage unit near my house. It will be pretty expensive – $50/month – for a unit about the size of a compact car. That means that I will have to pay $600/year to keep my supplies in it for an indefinite period of time. I’m not sure now if I’m going to do it. It would, however solve the problem of my DH throwing it all away on me, but with it so inaccessible in the storage place, I won’t be able to rotate stocks, and it might all be spoiled when I actually need it. May have to find another way.
            I guess the one place my DH and yours differ is on security. He did not object to me applying for my CFL, nor to me teaching the boys how to shoot and maintain firearms. Being the daughter of a military family has some advantages, so that I know more about this stuff than he does, grew up hearing my father and his brothers talk guns at family gatherings and spent Sunday afternoons at the range a few times a month. I enjoy reading the conversations some of the Wolfpack have about tactics and weapons of choice… feels like home, somehow.
            Don’t be left unprotected, Repair Mama. Find a way to get him interested in learning to shoot. Maybe find a way to be invited with a friend to a gun club? He might find he enjoys it more than he’d think. And then take it from there.
            The denial demonstrated by both of our DHs may be a symptom of their unacknowledged feelings of helplessness. Most people can see now that something unpleasant is coming. People don’t like to feel helpless, and so rather than face it, they ridicule it. At least that is what I think my DH is doing. May be what is going on in your home, too.
            Keep your chin up… we can do this.
            Yours in Upstate NY,
            Cat

            • MtWoman (N Central Texas) says:

              AliK…this phrase: “People don’t like to feel helpless, and so rather than face it, they ridicule it.” says so much. And I am seeing this in the grocery stores with the shoppers…judging each other…sometimes OUTLOUD and SHRILL with derision. The pressures are definately increasing, and the people who can’t face it are beginning to exhibit signs of stress. I don’t think it will take much to trigger trouble now.

              I know you meant the statement about your DH, but I saw in it a real example of what’s happening overall, and just wanted to state that.

              I so respect you (and all who are doing the same) for doing what your instincts tell you to, even in the face of your life-partner not understanding, supporting, or participating. That’s gotta be hard.

              Carry on.

            • Mt.Woman and Alikaat,

              Re: “People don’t like to feel helpless, and so rather than face it, they ridicule it.”

              What you guys say is so true. It seems that the more people protest about someone else, the more it becomes apparent that they are seeing something in others that they don’t want to face within themselves. Examples might include Strom Thurman’s insistence on segregation when after his death the head lines said, “Strom Therman’s Negro Love Child”. Another example would be Jerry Falwell. Anyone who goes on a national campaign thinking a particular (non anatomically correct) stuffed animal is gay probably has something hiding in the closet (hehe or he’s still in the closet).

              This does seem to be some sort of defense mechanism.

        • Sounds like the neighbors who got a surprise during one power outage when they discovered the decorative oil lamps hanging on our walls and sitting around on the tables actually worked to provide both light and heat although somewhat limited on the heat part. They thought they were just for looks. Blew their minds when they found the two red lantern lights in my den on both walls actually worked with oil besides electricity.

      • George is Learning says:

        Yeah I saw that too. I dont have a hand grinder (yet) but that looked like a great idea and kinda goes along with my exercise goals as well :-)

      • alikaat, I had friends and a few GFs that sound like your DH but when there has been a power outage, water cut off due to maintenance/damage, or stuck somewhere overnight somewhere due to bad weather they know I was always prepared.

        Don’t let it get to you or stop you. You may want to get a small storage rental for your preps if you can. This way out of their sight, out of their mind.

        • Texas Nana says:

          alikaat
          I know how you feel!! My DH was against me doing anything that was “prepper”, he’s still not 100%, but he’s better. Once I proved that my food prepping was saving “his” precious money, by being ahead of the inflation, he moved a little my way. I’ve just quietly kept adding a few things here and a few there. He doesn’t like to talk about it and he doesn’t want anyone in his family to know. His dad has already figured out what I’ve been doing, now we garden together. FIL has added a whole house generator, without me saying anything, and now we are building a greenhouse together. We have had some serious talks about the economy, and politics, which caused our gardens to get bigger.
          My in laws are great people, it sounds like have the opposite
          problem. Please don’t stop prepping, just keep finding hiding places for your “stuff”!! You will need all your preps sooner or later.

          • Wow. There are a lot of us on here with unwilling partners. Some of us are lucky enough to have found unexpected support in other family members, others have found friends who have become family, while others have just this site. And some are fortunate to have spouses who have or are beginning to come around.
            Prepping, learning, sharing our knowledge… pretty powerful stuff.
            Thank you, MD. For giving us this place!
            Blessings,
            Cat

    • Kat, try Bob’s Red Mill, Honeyville grains etc. they both have smaller packages of grains that might help with what you are looking for. Your food co-op too. Anita Kerr, of Simply Living Smart, aslo has stock of different grains.
      A good multi grain bread is yummy!

  26. Craig Cavanaugh says:

    I worked on organizing Coastal PATCOM.

    • I sure wish we could be there to meet everyone. You have done a LOT of work on that; and, it sounds like it is going to be a great event. Can’t wait to read all about it on your blog afterwards.

  27. MD,
    The Art of the Tactical Carbine as well as all of the Magpul “Art of the” videos are all excellent. Good pick.

  28. George is Learning says:

    This week was a good week.
    I have been practicing almost daily with my 9mm. I feel I’m getting to be a pretty decent shot. All grouping is now always in a 6-8 inch area.
    I have a mossberg 500 and am quite capable with it as well.
    So this week I moved up a few notches and finally got a ar15 colt sp6920. Wow what an awesome weapon. My favorite thing now to tell my wife is “This is my rifle, this is my gun, this is for shooting and this is for fun :-)”
    Shes not amused :-(
    I am continuing my purging of needless crap from my needless crap piles. I’ve been finding quite a few useful items in the needless crap pile. Which means to me, I’m getting my prepper mindset in the correct mode.
    The oxygen absorbers and mylar bags came today from emergency essentials. So I will be completing some of my food storage plans this coming week.
    I increased my cold and flu supplies with some buy 1 get one free deals at the local drug store .
    I added to my vitamin supply as well, A, D3, C, B-12, and some flaxseed oil.
    some multivitamins for the youngin.
    One of the hardest things for me to start is the exercise program, which is going to be bike riding , walking and running. I have slender body type but an 44 and haven’t really been treating myself the way I should. I will be starting with some yoga stretches getting myself ready for some cardio and then some free weights. I need to set the time aside and begin this.
    What good is all this gear if I cant haul it or defend in a hand to hand situation. I may not be able to get to my gun.
    I used to smoke cigs for I would say 20 years. I quit cigs over 2 years ago now and it was the best thing I could have ever done. If you smoke , quit today.
    I quit cold turkey. I got tired of wasting my money at the local corner store. I said no more and that was it, bam done. You can do it to, just do it.
    Now to put that same mindset to work in the exercise area. I will get into better shape. Im not in bad shape just I do get winded faster then I would like and would enjoy a bit more strength.
    I’m still playing with completing the emp shield for a few items, I just moved it to a back burner this week. I call it a emp shield and not a faraday cage as what I am making now is only a shield. Thanks to a decent article posted here and some further review I have a better understanding of what it is I will build.
    Thats about it.
    Oh I grabbed a few louieville sluggers from walmart to place around the house ,those work great :-)
    Looking forward to some more ideas from the other preppers.
    Have a great week all.

    • The Prepper says:

      Quitting smoking is the best thing ever! I haven’t had a smoke in almost 3-months, and I am SOOOOOOOO glad that I finally stopped. I’m starting to feel better, my body is beginning the recovery process, and hopefully a year from now I’ll still be smoke free. Congrats on quitting yourself George!

    • George,

      Full Metal Jacket is one of my favorite movies of all time. About the buy one get one half off at drugstores–check the regular price at Walmart. I find that most of the time, Walmart is still cheaper.

      • George is Learning says:

        Normally wallyworld is cheaper. Walgreens had a buy one get one free, so I was lured in. I went in for some extra reading glasses and well Im a sucker for a sale.
        Turned out the reading glasses were buy one get one free so I made out ok.
        Maybe I should play that scene in FMJ for my wife, so shes knows where it came from :-)
        Thanx Gayle, have a great week.

    • George, congrats on the new rifle and pistol training. The tighter the group the less likely you miss when needed.

      Getting back in shape is essential, you are right. A firearm is nice but if you can’t carry a small load if your vehicle breaks down, what good will it do.

    • Stretching is very valuable before and after a workout of any kind. Some do not stretch afterwards but that helps you from contracting to much after a workout and you recover from a workout faster.I once started stretching after being rear ended on the freeway and later the doctor said that was a good thing to do.It may have looked funny toughing my toes on the side of the freeway but it helped.

      • Axel, very true! The muscles tighten up from the impact so the stretching really makes a difference. Ice the sore areas and take some motrin if your body tolerates it if your dealing with soreness.

    • George is Learning, you have motivated me to get back out to the range on a regular basis now. What type of 9MM do you own? I picked up a Belgian made Browning high power last year that is 45 years old. I have yet to fire it but am looking forward to it.

  29. Today, we went to Sam’s Club. We parked between a Ford Explorer and another large SUV. We took notice of both vehicles’ thinking my car would be protected from the normal careless behavior of other car owners. When we came out, the Explorer was still parked next to us. The gas tank flap was open and the gas cap gone. My car was fine because I have a locked cap on mine. I’m sure the owner of that Explorer lost some of his fuel.

    A couple of week’s ago, my neighbor found another neighbor’s mail throw onto her lawn. The mail contained a reorder of checks which had been opened. She hand carried the mail one street over to the rightful owner once she came home from work.

    A year ago, my husband’s locked truck parked in our driveway had the driver’s window smashed during the night and something valuable stolen. My unlocked car has been ransacked at least twice. They like to leave the glove box open and a drawer under the passenger’s seat pull out as a signature. I also believe I have had gas siphoned during the night a couple of times so I spent the money for the key locking cap.

    Please take precautions from these examples, it is only going to get much worse!

    • marebear…you are right…that also happens here…and when I go to the big smoke am on high alert.

    • Glad you mentioned the locking gas cap. My DH bought one for his older truck which we have to park outside instead of in the garage. We have had some issues with teens “hanging out” after midnight in our neighborhood and he was worried about someone stealing the gas or worse. I think getting a locking gas cap for the other vehicle is a good idea, thanks for mentioning this.

  30. Wellrounded says:

    Sold 30 tonnes of scrap metal this week. We’ll use the cash to get 12 months ahead with stock feed, if we had to we could stretch this to last 24 months or more.
    Spent a lot of time in the vegetable garden getting ready to plant winter crops.
    We lost our lettuce crop to hail this week, if the hail had been larger we could have lost most of our summer vegetable crops, a reminder that we need to have alternatives to our alternatives. Our weather/rainfall here is very unpredictable, a bumper crop last year does not mean I’m going to have plenty this year. I’m working on enough in the pantry to allow for 2 years of crop failures.
    Canning jars are really expensive in Australia, it makes storing farm produce quite expensive (last quart jars I bought cost me $45.00 AUD per dozen). We have an Australian jar manufacturer and I do buy second hand jars when possible but the lids are about $25.00 AUD per dozen and they are really only designed for water bath preserving.

    • Wellrounded,
      30 tons? WOW, that is some real prepping and sounds like a lot of work.

      • Wellrounded says:

        Love to say, damn I’m tired was real hard work but that would be a bit of a fib, lol. Metal buyers brought 2 tractor trailers and and an excavator, other than loading a heap of small items into the larger items we just stood back and watched, took them 2 days. While they were here they very kindly lifted our premade silo roof onto the silo, bulk grain is coming next week.

    • wellrounded..noticed some canning jars last week…$2.90 for one jar (coles). Not that I am ready for canning stuff yet…have plenty of store bought stuff to get by – until/when am ready.

      However, have been looking into preserving fruit in brandy/liqueur etc – even though I don’t drink alcohol…others will appreciate it and give them a little kick as well – during tough times.

      Just so much other stuff has priority still. cheers.

    • granny mae says:

      wellrounded,
      Wow, at that price for jars and lids it would be cheaper to by all freeze dried foods already put up ! The last jars I bought here was in Dec. and they cost me $10.00 a dozen for wide mouth quarts. Regular quarts were $8.00 a doz. and pints were $6.00 a doz. for reg mouth and $7.00 for wide mouth. I’m going to get several boxes of the Tatler lids that can be reused may time so I don’t have to by them all the time. God Bless

      • grannymae, where do you get your canning jars and lids and is there an on line link to your source?

      • Wellrounded says:

        The problem we have in Australia is that EVERYTHING is expensive, lol. Freeze dried foods are also expensive. I stick to canning (water bath and pressure) because we eat what we store, all home grown with the exception of a few tropical spices, I can control exactly what my family eats. For us it’s not just about having enough stored it’s also about the quality of the food.
        We are seriously looking at buying a full pallet of jars and have it brought over in a shipping container. Would cost less than half of what I normally pay. With you on the Tatlers, at least they are cheap to ship to Australia.

  31. Vienna (Soggy prepper) says:

    Congrats on all the viewers M.D.!!! That’s quite a following. So now I’m even more paranoid with sharing preps!!!
    With that said… Preps were good this week as after reading the blog and news outlets I freaked out a bit and went to add to everything.

    Added:
    another oil lamp with additional guts and glass
    10 little liquid parafin candles (maybe for barter)
    2 oregels
    3 contact solutions
    25lbs sugar
    16 5oz canned ham pieces
    12 12.5oz canned chicken
    12 cans each of; Kidney beans, black beans, Great Northern Beans, tomatos, tomato sauce, mushrooms, olives, spaghetti o’s and refried beans.

    Also about 4 pints vodka (starting to add to the “trade items” stash and a couple for my vanilla extract when my vanilla beans arrive).
    McNaughtens (sp) had to tell DH when he uses one to replace it with 2!
    Can you tell I actually wrote down my preps this week so I’d remember!

    DH went to gun show today. Who knows what he’ll come home with. I caught him with video’s before he left!!! Cold steel knives is what he was watching! He looked really guilty when I caught him too. I forget the name of those spendy knives, but he doesn’t say anything about my food storage costs, sooooo……

    I don’t know if anyone else does that. But I’ve found that an easier way for me to add to preps. When I use something up I try to buy two… one for use (rotation of oldest to use of course) and one to store. I can’t always afford that, but when I can it sure helps add to the larder.

    Watched videos also on yogurt. Our conversations last week got me thinking. So at:

    http://everydayfoodstorage.net/food-storage-yogurt-with-powdered-milk

    I watched her video’s on making yogurt from powdered milk, making yogurt cheese (for use in cheesecakes!) and greek yogurt, oh and frozen yogurt. So sometime soon I will actually try the homemade yogurt.

    It’s never enough is it? Always something more to learn or to buy. I started food storage in 2008, just woke up one day and started looking it up. I had never thought of it before. I will believe it was of God till the day I die.
    Prices have gone up so much since then that I don’t even buy stuff I did just a couple years ago. Reading the news this week just made me shudder. How many people out there don’t even have a two weeks supply of food? How many people commute a considerable distance to work every day and will be hurting the higher the gas prices go?

    Ann Barnhardt was right on her price for buyout of Greek dollar. Which sets up a whole scenario, that if played out is going to be hell for everyone! And the headlines every where get worse and more bizarre.
    How come some people DONT see it?! Do they choose not to?

    So for downers this week, that’s what really got me this week. The psychological aspect of the blind and deaf sheeple to what is actually going on around us. Even when you try to explain to them, or show them with FACTS what is occurring and where it will potentially lead.

    The true zombies are kinda scary.

    • Vienna,

      Thanks for posting the yogurt link. That’s on my to-do list as well. I got everything I need to make mozzarella, and told my dh, offhandedly, that now I have enough stuff to make 40 lbs. of mozzarella. LOL. His eyes bugged out and he said, where are we going to put 40 lbs. of cheese! (He thought I was going to make 40 lbs. all at once.)

      • Vienna (Soggy prepper) says:

        haha! You can always tell him that your plan for waste control during shtf is eat a lot of cheese and never go again!

    • vienna…I also added to food preps…huge assortment. Maybe the sheeple don’t see it…it can’t just be denial…perhaps just sucked into a vortex – and the only things that they do see is the false digitalized images on TV screens – instead of seeing the homeless people, the lack of deep shelves stacked heavily with food – the cost of fuel…

      It is the same over on my side of the pond…some are only now starting to wake up – others are still asleep…

      I am alert to my surroundings when am out and about shopping…watch when I unlock my car and while unloading my groceries/preps.

      And cover my purchases with a doona – just thrown over messily, in case anyone is scoping out the parked cars for items.

      I rarely go to ATM’s … just get extra cash out while am paying for preps. cheers.

  32. NorCal Ray says:

    M.D. how are things going with the new homesite? You haven’t sais too much about it lately. Hope all is well with your Mom and Girlfriend and family.
    Had a pretty good week of prepping. From WalMart I picked up a Ruger 10/22 10 shot mag, per M.D’s review a Benjamin Nitro .22cal Pellett Gun (it’s awesome), a Daisy 880 .177 Pellett/B.B. Gun, 7 x 500ct. .22 cal. Pellets. 400rds. 20ga # 7 1/2 shotshells, 100rd Box .223 FMJ Federal Ammo, 1 x 25rd. Box .410 #8′s.

    From a customer 2 Shotgun Slings, 2 Rifle Slings, 2 packs of Pellet Gun Oil, 2 x 50rd Boxes .22lr Winchester.
    From Craigslist 250 rds. Federal 168grn BTHP .308 , 360 rds. Remington 180grn SP Corelokt .308.

    From Walgreens 1 box 3×3 Gauze 20 pk., 1 box 2×2 Gauze 10 pk. 2 rolls
    Cloth First Aid Tape.

    Last Sunday planted the garden, peas, tomatoes, Bok Choy, Cilantro, Broccoli, Cauliflower. Transplanted some Turnips and Lettuce.
    Harvested Turnips, Cabbage, Turnip Greens, and Radishes.

    Thats all for this week. Take care all.
    Ray

    • NorCal Ray, good preps. I could use some more pellets in my preps. Some situations may call for a pellet instead of a bullet.
      I’ve relaoded BBs in shotgun shells because the manufactured BB loads are too expensive.

      Any concerns using Craigslist getting the ammo? Didn’t know they could sell/trade ammo there.

      • NorCal Ray says:

        They can sell or trade ammo, reloading supplies etc. Just can’t sell firearms although I have seen a lot on there recently. I would not take a chance of buying any off of there.
        The only concern I have with buying ammo (or anything) off of there is there have been alot of holdups lately from people who advertise items for sale and then when someone shows up to buy they rob them.
        Ray

    • ray…thanks so much…received the package…my DD loved the solar flashlight -and my SIL couldn’t put the knife down…

      many thanks once again..you know you did not need to add the knife…but so glad now that I have it…what a beauty…and just the right size for my hand – it is in my car – and can’t wait to use it.

      We put the flashlights in the sun while we had our al fresco lunch yesterday…cheers.

      • NorCal Ray says:

        Chloe,
        You are very welcome. I have about 4 or 5 of the knives left if you want any. Those particular ones run about 7.75 ea.
        Ray

  33. NorCal Ray says:

    Oh, almost forgot. Putting new transmission in my Grand Cherokee this week also. Been an expensive week with our anniversary last Sat., Valentines and now her Birthday. Going to a Crabfeed tonight.
    Wifes Birthday is tomorrow. She wants to ride her Mt. Bike to work. Installed new handlebar basket with quick disconnect. Rear luggae rack with panniers and Head and Taillights. (Did the same to all three bikes. Our alternate means of transportation.)
    Ray

  34. village idiot says:

    I quit trying to tell them anything, Vienna. This country is on the most predictable path ever seen to economic destrution and all anybody can talk about is the Catholic Church and contraception. It’s ridiculous. I’m headed back out to the gun range to scrounge up some more brass after the city folk get through shooting. For some reason, they just leave their brass laying. Oh, well, my gain. I’d forget about them zombies you’re talking to, they are on government hand-outs and they are going to suck that tit dry before they let go.

  35. mountain lady says:

    I canned 11 pints of cranberry relsh, 3 pints of turkey meat and 3 pints of turkey broth. I have been using a lot of my dehydrated veggies this winter, so am planning to buy 10 lb of carrots and a few restaurant size bags of mixed vegs and corn next trip to town,next month. Hope everything hold together that long.

    Prayers asked for those that need them.

    • Mountain Lady,

      How do you make your cranberry relish? I’ve never made that but it sounds good.

      • mountain lady says:

        Gayle, This was two restaurant bags that I got at food distribution, a gift from on high. I personally cheat when I make mine, by using canned berry sauce and adding a peeled diced apple and a diced orange. It is also very good. I am not a great cook, but I can throw a few things together,lol.

        • Mountain Lady,

          HaHa. Here I was imagining you cutting the fresh cranberries in half, and all the rest.

  36. OPSEC! I have directed several people to The Survivalist Blog this past couple of weeks; so, I have changed my Wolf Pack name. I have been reading and commenting on here for almost 3 years. This makes me an oldie; but, a goodie. The amount that I have learned from everyone has been amazing.

    I don’t remember who posted last week about http://www.calvetsupply.com; but, many thanks for another bit of great information. I received my order yesterday—assorted antibiotics (on sale), Blood Stop Powder and Kwik Stop gel stypic with benzocaine.

    The thrift stores were pretty good this week. I bought a dozen quart jars for 33 cents apiece, an oil lamp for $2; and, 2 Sets of new ( in the box) Foodsaver canisters for $4 a set.

    The food preps included dehydrating 10 pounds of oranges, making 9 jars of jelly, and “putting up” 75# of sugar, 50# of long grain rice, and pressure canning 20# of bratwurst sausages.

    More and more, I am seeing less and less on store shelves. When the panic buying starts for “the Mayan thing”, it is going to get a whole lot worse. I wish everyone a happy and healthy week.

    • riverrider says:

      i’m wondering if the shelves are bare so the stores won’t lose as much in the riots?

      • River according to my gf I’m the reason our Walmart can’t keep peaches, pears and pineapples on the shelf lol.
        That, .45, .223 and instant coffee lol.

        She said my pantry is full, where you going to put that stuff. I told her half at the office in the event I can’t leave (mandated to stay in a federal or state emergency) work and the rest I’m putting in my second fridge that is a back up and unplugged.

        • jarhead…that is so funny…and I laughed so hard…because I am the same…got lots…and much better to have it all here at my place, than trying to get into town before/during a cyclone or whatever.

          • Chloe, exactly. I was involved in the los angeles riots and saw the worse in people. Also saw what happens after a hurricane and tornado in some areas as well. We haven’t had that bad of an earthquake but if something happens I do not want to go to the store.

            If I had to I think I would only grab water and go but I have enough to get by and then distill my pool water if need be.

    • Ozarkanna, what kind of antibiotics did you get? I checked out the site myself, but I wasn’t sure what to get or whether I should just get all of them. I was happy to see penicillin. And did you get 250 mgs or 500 mgs? Do you know the best way to store them to preserve potency?

      • Texas Nana says:

        Ozarkanna
        Great thrift store buys!! I will say that it’s getting harder and harder to find canning jars at the thrift stores or on craigslist. Not to mention that wally world has been running low on them. Makes you think, who’s buying up all the jars?!?

        • Texas Nana,
          This is the first time in over 6 months that I have been able to find any jars at the thrift store. Usually, there would be one lone jar with a $1 price tag on it.
          I forgot to say that I was at Sam’s last week and they were out of salt except for the little, fast food size packets. It gave me an odd feeling to not be able to find something as basic as salt in a store that big.

          • Texas Nana says:

            Ozarkanna,
            I’ve been having a hard time finding canning jar at the thrift stores, myself. As far as the stores asking $1 per jar, I talked to 3 different ones, stating that that’s full price, all 3 stores made a deal with me. The first one I tried that at had 1 quart jar marked $1, they wanted to know if I couldn’t find something else that I needed. I said yes, but the price was to high, I stated that was full price, that would include a band and flat. I got the jar for 50 cents. The next store had 10 quart jars, also marked $1 each, I just told the lady that was full price, she sold them for $4. The last place is the highest priced thrift store we have, I normally don’t even go in they are so high, but DH had to be at the store next door, so in I went. They had 24 pints, regular mouth, priced at 49 cents, I ask if I buy all of them will you sell them cheaper, she can down to 30 cents each, sold. That’s been a good two months, no jars since then. I’m hoping folks will clean out their garages now that the weather is warming up. I’ll keep making my rounds and hopefully fall into some more jars. Don’t forget to check craigslist!
            Our sam’s was low on salt also!

      • Conmaze,

        Watch this video by Patriot Nurse.

        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DOfthwm_v3E

      • conmaze..what I did, was get both 250mgs and 500mgms…

        Go to armageddon medicine, or to the Patriot Nurse – will explain the difference in the different strengths…

        and can store them in the fridge, not freezer.

        Both AM and PN write/speak about expiry dates and how to store antibiotics.

        and also a Dr Bob on Rawles’ site dispenses antibiotics (and perhaps other necessary prescription meds) for SHTF time…don’t know for how long – so, time is of the essence in your search…hope this helped…cheers.

      • keep them in a cool dark dry place. my puter cooked a few months back and I lost a bunch of links so I cant provide the link to this info. 5 years after the exp. date most antibiotics maintained 95% strength. there is one that turns toxic cant remember the name though, the patriot nurse has a good vidieo on the subject
        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DOfthwm_v3E
        this will help you decide what to get

        Stay safe

    • And I forgot to ask you another question…I just dehydrated oranges for the first time. How do you do yours? I sliced them about 1/4″ thick and left the skin on.

      • Canmaze,

        Do you have The Dehydrator Bible? I got that book this week and it’s very comprehensive.

      • Hi Conmaze,
        I did my oranges the same way. Check out “Dehydrate2Store.com”. This is a wonderful site. I second Gayle’s advice about Patriot Nurse. I find it so amazing the amount of knowledgeable information that so many people are willing to share to help others. There are some truly odd things on the internet, as well; but, with our leader of the pack, M.D., and all of the guest posts and follow-up comments, we are all able to decide if certain things will fulfill our needs or not.

      • conmaze, I cut skin off the limes, lemons and oranges..and cut them about 1/4 ” thick also…

        I then dehydrated all the peels – and I add these peels (stored in a glass screw top lid) to a cup of tea sometimes…

        peels are very lightweight when taken camping – stored in a plastic screwtop jar – and give off a wonderful aroma and all natural – and I sometimes chew the softened peels also – as not into candies. hope this helped…cheers.

        • however, next time, I may just leave skins on…and throw a slice into a cup of tea…either way works.

    • http://aquaticpharmacy.com/eShop.php has lower prices than CalVet, and free shipping for all orders.

  37. I need some advice. I am looking at investing in reloading equipment for my spent brass. In addition to the ins and outs of reloading, I could use some direction on a proper setup (what I should be buying) so I’m not wasting my time and money.

    I spent yesterday cleaning and repairing my dad’s 1958 Remington Fieldmaster 572. Removed all of the rust from the barrel and inside the firearm. Cleaned out the old, solidified lubricant from the trigger assembly, bolt, part of the barrel where the bolt is seated. The superficial rust on the magazine tube and scope were worked on with CLP and a wire brush, but the rust proved to be more resilient than anticipated. Disassembled the 4x scope and used Windex and Q-tips to clean the grime off of the lenses. Returned the scope to a mechanical zero after scraping out the gunk from the adjustment screws. Aside from re-zeroing the scope, this .22 rifle is almost good as new (minus the wear and tear caused by improper storing). My dad is elated at the fact that the rifle he bought when he was 16 is up and running again.

    Bought my dad a Winchester universal cleaning kit and 100 rounds of CCI Mini-Mag 22 LR for the Fieldmaster.

    Went couple of days ago to wally world and picked up two seven gallon plastic water containers and a new carbon filter.

    Purchased a handful of American Eagle silver coins today.

    Will be ordering a Berkey water filter system tonight.

    I went to a local gun store today to check prices on a Mossberg 500 and a Remington 870. Have to be careful in that store when buying things since a great deal of it is way overpriced. Was absolutely astounded at the number of people in that store. Seems like a bunch of people are hedging their bets in this economy.

    The bug I put in my dad’s ear about being prepared for an emergency a while back is starting to pay off. He is finally looking into buying enough food and water to last a month and a shotgun for his house. He also made mention about looking into a generator for the house. My goal logistically speaking is to nudge him towards having at least four months of supplies on hand in the house. Realistically, I don’t see him preparing for anything beyond a four month point since his optimism about how bad things will get and the length of time it will take before it improves hasn’t been sufficiently squashed.

    • cosmolined says:

      Cain:
      I’ve been reloading for 43 years. I have a Dillon 550B. This may strike some folks poorly, but I think reloading these days is not worth the effort. If you buy in bulk from someone like Widener’s you will get good ammo at a great price. The cost of the components for reloading has gone through the roof! When you add in the space and time you need to reload, I just don’t see it being worth the time. Cos

      • village idiot says:

        Mr. cosmolined, you may be right, but I like to reload. I scrounge up brass at the shooting range, I bought a used RCBS rockchucker press, and I put together some scales, a case trimmer, funnel and other stuff by going to garage sales, and buying off friends. I trade brass I gather up at the range for powder and other supplies. I think reloading will be a good skill to have. I’ve been saving up powder, and I’ve bought several thousand large pistol and rifle primers, and several thousand more small rifle primers. I got tons of brass for the calibers I reload, so my expenses are pretty small I guess. Anyway, for some it might not be good, but it works for me.

        • Mr. Village Idiot:
          I was going on the assumption you didn’t have the gear yet.
          My first reloader was $39. I thought that was robbery…
          Now that I know you have your setup and enjoy it, I’d say
          Good Job! It is a handy thing to know. Safe shooting!

          • Oops…. Sorry Cain. I thought Village’s response was yours. If you don’t have any of the tools, I’d still go with Widener’s. The Privi Partisan is decent and cheaper than I can get it at the brick and mortar stores here.

          • village idiot says:

            Yeah, if you try to go 1st class, and buy one of those kits, they are very expensive. I saw your point. If you have plenty of money it’s like anything else, it’s easy. But if you have to watch your funds like I do, you just have to work around it. I go to the shooting range all the time anyway, so picking up brass got to be a normal activity for me. I also buy up silver coins from people who want to sell them, and I sell two or three guns a year to make some extra money. I also make gun stocks, and have a few of those drying right now. Being retired, I try to do numerous things to make a little under-the-radar money. Barter economy. Barterring will be another good skill.

            • I’m still in the research phase right now on this. It looks like I’d need to reload 10,000 rounds or so before I could justify the expense of one.

              I’m not a fan of ammunition made outside the United States. A good chunk of it is either corrosive, non-reloadable, or of questionable quality. All of my ammo is Federal, Remington, Winchester, and CCI. The only exception to this is the former Soviet block ammo needed for my PSL. I haven’t found any company in the US that makes a 148 gr – 151 gr 7.62 x 54r round.

            • Cain:
              Double Tap Ammo (doubletap.com) does make a hunting round for the 7.62x54R. But hang on to your wallet. However, since I really don’t need that much hunting ammo (150 gr Barnes TSX, which is a favorite of mine) I would have been better off to just buy 5 boxes than go through what I did to get dies, brass, and bullets. Unfortunately, I got the parts before I saw their listing.

            • My uncle does both. He buys in bulk and reloads. He buys 223or the gi equivelent and he also reloads 45 auto.He has a few 223 carbines where he buys bulk ammo but he reloads his 45 auto because he has some pretty nice 45`s. He has Wilson combat and s&w custom shop 45 autos.My stepdad reloads everything that he owns in centerfire with the exception of 12 gauge.He has to handload for his 280 since it is a Ackly improved 280 not a commercial 280.It is also a relaxing hobby,people with hi blood pressure may help from it.

            • cosmolined says:

              Cain: I am an avid shooter. Privi-partisan in non-corrosive, reloadable and accurate. Cos

    • Cain, I agree with both Cosmo and village idiot. Reloading can be expensive but sometimes you can work around costs. I had bought a Dillon 550 off a gun range for $500 with 9mm, 40 and 45 dies. I no longer have it due to a family member (won’t go into).
      I also have a single stage reloader where I load each round individually and like village said it is relaxing. You can pick up brass and maybe wheel and deal or buy in bulk.
      Like Cosmo I buy in bulk to save money and once in a while I pull out the reloader to keep up on the skill. I have enough to reload 1,000 .45ACP and I’m lucky if I broke even compared to buying in bulk.

      Cain, I know your looking for lower grain rounds but Cheaper Than Dirt has Winchester 180 grain ammo for $21. Part number 2-WNMC54RSP. Check with local gun shops as well.

    • I started reloading with a Lee Classic Field Loader, every thing you need to reload in a box the size of a paperback novel, except the hammer/mallot. Even though I now have single stage, turret, and progressives. I still have an old wack a mole style for all my major calibers. In a GOOD bag I keep one set up for my .357s another has a 9mm and a 30.06. I don’t ever plan too bug out but having a reloading set up that small for under $30 a caliber brings piece of mind. Things to add later would speed it up like scales, and hand primers. But I can hand load from pistol to 20 gauge with a rock for a hammer and a stump for a load bench. Cabellas and Midway have them for less than Lee Precision, but for a backup or just to see if reloading is for you, it’s worth a peek. The shotgun kits are no longer made but do turn up on gunbroker or even Ebay. IIRC the 20 gauge kit ran me $39 shipped, and only needed a shot measure to be complete. Extra depimers are handy as thats the only thing I ever broke on one, and that was due to a berdan case.

  38. texasmomma says:

    I finally had a day at home. I got up at 6am and started canning the venison in the freezer. So satisfying to see those little jars lined up in the shelf. :) The kids begged, so I figured what the heck, I haven’t had time to do this in a few weeks, I ground some wheat and made bread. DH built shelves for our water barrels. Now we have room for a couple more.
    Got an order from Auguson farms. They had blueberries on sale and nothing makes my 5 year old happier than blueberries in his oatmeal every morning.
    Made a Costco run and picked up paper plates, canned chicken and peanut butter.
    Had to stop at the grocery store for odds and ends after work yesterday. I was behind two ladies that each had baskets. They seperated out the basket and ran the food first. Whipped out the Lonestar card. When that was finished they ran through the multiple bottles of wine and a load of make up. For that they paid cash. Both had their nails done, hair done and both were holding their I-phones. Meanwhile it has been moths since I had a hair cut and had just spent several minutes in the canning section debating buying more canning jars because they were more than I wanted to spend. I am on a budget you know. I just wanted to cry.

    • Texas Nana says:

      Texasmomma
      Boy do I know how you feel!! It makes me sick to see these folk buying steak, shrimp, food stuff that we can’t afford, but they whip out the Lonestar card (food stamp card for Texas). Don’t get me wrong I’m not jealous, not at all. I’m sick as that’s my tax money!!! I shop the thrift stores for everything from our clothes to canning jar, to material for sewing. Do you think these folks do? You don’t normally see people with their nails and hair all done up at the thrift stores. Who you see is hard working folks trying to make it from paycheck to paycheck without government help.
      Don’t know where you live in Texas but check out your local thrift stores and craigslist for canning jars.

      • Texas Nana, George and H-D,

        I see the same thing. I agree with H-D. Thank God we have our integrity. The crap “food” these folks buy won’t even last them two weeks. Then their kids go hungry the last week or two of the month.

        Gas is up to $4 a gallon and some think it will be $6 by summer. When gas goes up, groceries go up. These folks will not be able to afford groceries. And that is when the riots will start.

      • granny mae says:

        Texas nanna
        Here is an eye opener for most folks. When you see someone with a food stamp card and theyare buying fancy foods and look pretty well off, they may not be the real owner of the card ! It is the practice of many drug users today to give their card and pin number in trade for their drugs, the dealer uses the card to buy what they want and then the drug user gets the card back until the next month when the money gets put back on it. Then the story starts all over again ! It is sick and disgusting but that is what is happening. Got that from a good source !

        • Either that or they just rent the card out for cash , the going rate here is about 50-75 cents on the dollar. So some poor soul sells $100 worth of the food they are supposed to use to not starve and get $50 in cash for what ever else they want. Makes me sick also that my tax dollars are being scammed , I bet any of us on this group could take one of these foodstampers to Aldi’s and show them how to feed four people for a whole month for less than $100. Of course just like someone else said they would not probably know how to cook rice and beans and would probably go into shock on eating a plainer diet. They would probably lose a few pounds and get healthier also.

          • George,

            I think we need to get rid of the “food stamp card” which allows people to pick and choose what food they want. We should instead do like the Mormons do–see what foods the NEED (not want) and then give them staples like oatmeal, cornmeal, wheat, beans, rice and powdered milk. If they want fresh veggies, they can grow a garden in a community plot.

            • Um, just handing them a box of dry goods and telling them to grow their veggies would not be good. Even with education about how to cook it, some people would be selling the grain for pennies on the dollar just to get something more familiar.

              Some SNAP and WIC recipients do spend too much time and energy working to tend to a garden, especially one that could be stolen from.

              Then there is malnutrition. Sure, the children would be getting vegetables on their school pizzas, but the parents would become crippled sooner or later, especially when there isn’t any fat in your staples.

              Of course some of them could supplement their diets by eating people’s dogs and cats. (I love pets but I wish there was a system where the humane society could sell the euthanized animals as something more useful than fertilizer.)

              —–

              I mean, yeah, the scamming is a bad thing, but there has to be a better solution that doesn’t torture the people that just need a hand up. I’m still looking for answers about done nails and food stamps, but it seems beyond “they had that conspicuous item before they hit on bad times and didn’t sell it,” they’re being irresponsible with the money they should be saving or they’re being irresponsible with unrecorded income. (Actually, I did see a “job dress-code and stopping on the way home” comment after some digging.)

            • Kelekona,

              Providing only basic needs for the poor is not a form of torture. It is actually far more humanitarian that our current system. In the United States, we have made the folks on welfare and food stamps so comfortable that they have little incentive to get off the dole. Why look for a job if you can “buy” steak and lobster with your food stamps?

            • I was doing some digging on how much people get on the snap program and got nothing but unconfirmed numbers from people who claimed to get less than $100 per person per month.

              Anyway, I think we’re on two different sides of the spectrum. There are people who don’t actually need SNAP or any help other than mental therapy. There are non-citizens that actually qualify and I don’t quite know what to make of that. There are people who purposely don’t get married because it makes more financial sense not to acknowledge the baby-daddy. There are people who would suddenly have to make do with less if they got a poorly-paying job that bumped them out of the brackets.

              Then there are people who either are honestly trying or have no way to get out of the situation. One woman has a low-paying job but can’t get a different one because the school keeps calling her away to deal with her autistic child’s behavior.

              Some family is living the American dream until their breadwinner suffers from a crippling ailment that ironically makes them lose the insurance that would help pay for physical therapy. Parent #2 has no marketable skills or experience beyond younger applicants, so he’s 11th in line at best for any position. They had been responsible but hadn’t counted on needing to hoard a lifetime’s worth of savings that early in their lives, and the foodstamps are already too much of a goad.

              Pretty much the only way a meager foodbox will do more good than harm is by scrutinizing every recipient, but by that time you might as well cut the deadbeats off completely. I suppose that the extra manpower could be paid for by the saved stamp money and hired from the pool of recipients who are trying but can’t get jobs.

              There was a point I came across about how there would be riots if the handouts stopped. That might be a tempting incentive to go ahead and pay for the bread and circuses.

            • MtWoman (N Central Texas) says:

              I feel the need to chime in here…again…as I take exception to the general tone of this conversation about foodstamp recipients. Generalizing anything is not a realistic way to observe it. There are always “good” and “bad” to every situation. Not every FS recipient buys “crap food”, has their hair & nails done, uses the FS for the wrong thing, is a drug addict, etc. Really pay attention, and I’ll bet you could see some folks using the FS card that ARE buying ‘good’ food, DON’T look ‘fixed-up’, ARE down on their luck people who ARE just trying to survive. Believe me….they’re out there. I’ve been one of them.

              I have been on foodstamps twice…both times due to unforeseen circumstances that I had no control over. The first time was when my son’s father left me with a new-born baby, never to be seen again. It happens. The most recent was my move into my father’s place to care for him, leaving my west coast weekly-paying job, and moving to Texas to do so. It was a necessary thing to do, and had to be done immediately. I had no savings at the time due to health expenses. The state helped me for 6 months with foodstamps…albeit ‘only’ $75 a month because I took early SS to do this, and though it’s very little, it counted as income enough to make the FS what it was.

              I am a person with a good work ethic. Caring for my father is a full-time job, with no pay. He does not have ‘extra’ money, so I need to do whatever I can to care for myself while caring for him. And getting foodstamps was part of the deal. Believe me, I did not want to sit in that office like I had to, waiting (for hours) for someone to examine my life in detail to see if I was “worthy”, all the while surrounded by folks with multiple kids. To get foodstamps, you must reveal intimate details about yourself and your life. It is not fun, and I would have avoided it if I could. When the SHTF, it takes COURAGE to swallow pride and ask for help from wherever you can get it.

              I did not renew the foodstamps when the time came. It was my choice to stop and make do…even though it is a real struggle. And there are many, many folks out there who have also done that, and are getting by on very little….because of their integrity, and the need to maintain it.

              So when the conversations get going on here that generalize about ANY “type” of person (FS recipients, hippies, immigrants, etc.), I am disappointed. I see the Wolfpack as a good group of folks who should be beyond this type of thing. Any situation can happen to ANYone, no matter how well you think you’re prepared, and ANYone can find themselves in need of asking for help from wherever they can get it. None of us is above that….ever. Any of us could be “them” at some point in time.

              My words here are to the point, as I’m steamed. Where’s the humanity????? Where’s some compassion??? Why do I have to feel I might not be worthy of being a Pack member because I got foodstamps??? Makes me mad, and sad…….

            • MtWoman (N Central Texas) says:

              BTW…I imagine that participants in this blog and preppers in general include immigrants, hippies, welfare recipients, people of all races, people of many different religions or no religion, ‘educated’ and ‘uneducated’ people, people with different levels of economic means, etc, etc, etc. Prepping isn’t ‘owned’ by any one group or type of people. The state of our country and the world affects us all, and many will come to prepping from all walks of life.

              It doesn’t behoove us to harbor prejudice of any kind. It isn’t helpful or constructive. I have come to think of the people who post here as a family of sorts…at the very least a group of people of like mind in what’s going on and what to do about it. And it disturbs me when there is discussion in prejudice.

              This is all I will say about this. I had to get it off my chest.

            • MtWoman (N Central Texas) says:

              BTW…my comments here are not directed at any one person or persons, but to the TONE of the conversation.

            • Kelekona,

              I agree there are people who genuinely need help–that there are people who are not gaming the system. These people should be helped. But but charity organizations that function at the local level are far more astute at dolling out goods than the federal government. It is wrong for the government to use its coercive powers to force citizens to help others. We should help the poor. But we should not be forced to do so by the government. Charity is a function of the church, not the state.

            • Mt. Woman,

              We are discussing abuses in the welfare and food stamp programs, and whether the federal, state or local governments should be involved in such assistance. I for one think there would be less abuse if churches and other charitable organizations were handing out the aid instead of the government. We should deal with those in need at the community level and not at the federal level. If someone came into your church with $65 nails and perfectly done hair, how willing would you be to give to that individual– when you know there are others in your community who genuinely cannot afford basic staples. When the federal government runs welfare, a significant portion of the budget is allocated towards means testing–whether the person in question really needs assistance. If the folks in need live in your community, you know who needs assistance and who is out to game the system. And if it is your church’s money, you can put demands on those who receive assistance. For instance, if it’s known that Person X has an alcohol problem, then require that person to attend AA meetings as a precondition to receiving food assistance. We need to solve our country’s problems at the level of the family and the community–not at the level of the federal government.

    • Hunker-Down says:

      texasmomma,

      Yes, but your integrity is intact! Your hair looks beautiful the way it is.

      Your attitude and self denial look pretty sharp too.

    • Texasmomma, I have noticed the same type of thing. I see people with carts heap over with stuff falling out of them and it is all just Frozen, pre-made , convinience and junk food with no really nutrition at all. It looks like hundreds of dolllars worth of stuff and they just throw it in without thinking how much it costs and what it is doing to them. Meanwhile I don’t buy anything unlesss it is on sale and maybe I have a coupon for it and then still think twice about it. These peoople will really be in for a shock when shtf and all their frozen crap thaws and they do not know how to cook a single thing and will expect , no DEMAND that someone else take care of them. It is sad what a sorry shape this once wonderful county is in now.

      • I shift from thinking these folks are just cankers on society to feeling sorry for them–they are completely clueless. The majority of Americans on welfare are uneducated, single mothers with illegitimate kids (or mothers caught in the trap of poverty because the biological father of their illegitimate children refuses to pay court ordered child support). These women grew up in homes without a father. For many of these women, welfare is the only life they have known.

        I encounter many of these folks in my work. (But the ones I encounter are the ones trying to get out of poverty.) Just a few days ago I was talking to one woman about the price of groceries (she is a nursing major, unwed with a child). She had absolutely no clue how to grocery shop to save money. No one ever taught her. (She has since started shopping strategically.) These folks grow up in households where the mother often worked two part-time jobs (and was still on welfare). They don’t prepare meals and buy the instant food so their kids can fix their own meals. If you handed them a bucket of beans and a bucket of rice, the majority would have no clue how to fix it.

        If you want to read a disturbing article, check this out.

        http://www.mysanantonio.com/news/article/Unwed-mothers-now-claim-most-births-younger-than-3340557.php

        • Gayle,

          Just read that link, depressing. The last paragraph speaks volumes about education and maybe a little desperation. It is getting really hard to find a decent guy, ask any young lady. I have a 19 year old in college and she and her friends complain that most guys are total slackers. Granted they are a very motivated bunch, but it is the trend. Is it to many video games, bad parenting, or just a sick society? The problems seem to run through many countries.

        • How do we correct the issue of cooking no longer being passed down through families?

          The only home-economics course I took consisted of learning how to make a pudding pie from a mix. I don’t think that schools even attempt to teach anything beyond the basic four anymore?

          There was a storefront learning center connected to Food Revolution, but that was privately funded for one town, probably didn’t teach buying strategy alongside healthy eating, and it’s probably gone since the show’s been cancelled.

          • Hunker-Down says:

            Kelekona,

            Google “cooking from scratch”.

            If you’re talking about your children, buy them a pound of flour, a pound of butter, a pound of sugar, then tell them to “go google”. Wait for their stomachs to empty, then they will get off the couch.

            • Me? Breed? I admire your confidence in me but both I and the hubby have some very nasty undesirable traits beyond my being a little over the ideal age. Plus the nephews need spoiling and we can’t afford that if I go irresponsible and queef out a larvae. (Toys that develop lateral thinking can get pricey, especially once we go lateral in picking them…. Kids are going to get a cheap power drill at some point.)

              My mother taught me enough about cooking to deal with most of the stuff in your pantries. I don’t guarantee taste, but it should be edible and easy enough to swallow. I was a little bit ahead of her until I introduced her to squash and taught dad how to make cake without a mix.

              About the most responsible thing I could probably do is to find a church to join and volunteer to teach a class on the wonders of bean soup.

            • Hunker-Down says:

              Kelekona,

              Lets start a class; I’ll teach PPJ.

          • Kelekona,

            People will only learn to cook when appropriately motivated–when processed and pre-cooked foods become so expensive relative to flour, sugar and milk, that they are presented with a choice: learn to cook or go hungry. Outreach is unproductive if folks who need help are unwilling to learn.

    • texasmomma, understand completely…hold yourself up tall and strong…and they are not the examples you could be basing yourself on…(they are suffering as well).

      there are plenty of pack members you can identify with … we support your integrity and strength…

      stay focused…the time is coming when the strength that is growing daily through your current suffering is going to be needed…

      And the fact that you are going without now, so you can prepare for the long haul when things get bad – many others identify with you, myself included…

      Stand strong texas momma – when the panic buying happens – you will have your children and family close and safe – with food/water/medicines aplenty…and no need to be jostled in the stores during those times.

      Instead I pray for the people who do not see what is happening..perhaps they can not see a better future, so are spending foolishly now, and hoping that things will be better tomorrow.

      Texas momma, don’t cry…stick to your budget – focus on the bigger picture and take it a few budgeted dollars at a time…that is what I do…and probably many others on this blog too, and how many lurkers – all budgeting and doing the best we can.

      I got a great kick out of washing three pairs of joggers..they were coming apart at the sides…am hard on my shoes…so, threw them in the washing machine…dried and then used shoeglue to repair them…turned out great, and I can keep wearing them while I walk down my dirt road…

      So, between your canning jars, and my repaired joggers..we are still prepping…

      And saw this somewhere on net…use it up, wear it out, make it do, etc…till next time…

      • texas momma, I feel the same way. I scrape to buy any extras. but prepping lets me keep my head up! I will be able to protect and feed my family, better than most at the very least.

        stay safe

        • texasmomma says:

          Thanks for the pep talk. I guess I needed it. :) I guess it is just frustration, cartainly not jealousy. I was raised in a “prepper” family before there was a term for it. I was born and lived in Alaska til I was 9. It was just our lifestyle. Even after we moved to California gardening, canning, sewing etc were the norm. I feel sorry for these people that can’t take care of themselves. They scare me a bit because I know that when something happens to take away their meal ticket, they will be coming after those of us that have prepared.
          H-D, I went ahead and gave myself a trim this morning, so maybe now I can beleive your comment about my hair ;)
          Texas Nana, I am outside of Houston. Thanks for the tip, I will be hitting some thrift store during my lunch hours this week.
          Again, thanks for the pep talks. I do feel better.

          • village idiot says:

            I was reading along in your first comment, texasmomma, and these verses came to my mind:

            Proverbs 31: 30-31-”Favor is deceitful, and beauty is vain; but a woman that fearth the Lord, she shall be praised. Give her of the fruit of her hands; and let her own works praise her in the gates.”

          • Repair Mama says:

            Hey girl, it sounds to me that you are ahead of the game more than you give yourself credit for. If you were raised this way, you know how to improvise, make do , clean and fix, and repair what you need to. Most of the people today give into the disposable society. yardsales, trash day and thrift stores are the best, funnest way to find things you can use for cheap or free. clean them up, fix it up and you have a great find. More people need to learn what you already know.
            Hang in there girl. You are a survivor! you do it every day. Those idiots at the store with their fancy hair and expensive nail jobs dont have a snowballs chance in hell to make it through what is coming. I have the same issue when I am in town with my work cloths, plain mangled nails, dry skin, hair in pony tail, and ugly work shoes. I want to have pretty hair and be able to dress like a fashional lady. I work hard and these things are not practical for me. I know deep in my heart that I can find a solution to most of the crap that falls or fails in my house. These painted ladies can t even change their own furnace filter, much less cook anything from scratch. They will starve in their falling down houses. and we wont. We will have our home made water filters, wood burners heating with wood we cut. we will be eating bread the beans that we make and they will be in line somewhere begging for what ever the government is passing out.
            Sometimes I do take a few hours for me. Might dye my hair or trim it up, do my nails with the tons of nail polish that my teen girls left here before they moved on into adulthool. I will get out their old curling irons and a little hair spray that I got for free with coupons, and feel pretty for a while. But all in all, I am a tough ass old bird, and I will survive! And so will you!
            Just remember that you are far superior to these idiots, and they are nothing without their fancy cars, cloths, jewelry, and FOOD STAMP CARDS! They are the dredges of society. You have knowledge, ability, and class. Money cant buy anyone these things.
            Take care. We are all in this together.
            We love ya and know where you are coming from.
            Hang in there. Your work will be rewarded in much better ways.

            • Repair Mama,

              Don’t look at those fake nails with envy. My mom convinced me to have my nails done for my wedding. The first day we were on our honeymoon I tried to cut them off and couldn’t. They are like claws that have to be sanded down–no kidding. I will never go into one of those places again.

    • Texasmomma I understand your feelings. I see it all the time where I live. Most of the people in my town are welfare of some type. They leave the store with sacks of junk food and put it into their new cars. They live better than I do at this point, but I will be the victor because I have saved and will be better off in the long run.

      I know of a girl who is 19 with two babies. She lives in government housing and with her Lone Star card she feeds several other homes. Her babies get WIC and she also receives SSI because the oldest baby was born with her stomach out of the body and is on a feeding tube. She never went past the 9th grade and started GED classes, but it was getting too hard for her and she hasn’t been back. She has no driver’s license and gets money for getting people to cart her around…she is supposed to give the money to the people taking her to dr. appt, etc…but she keeps that. When the Money Tree dries up I fully expect her to knock on my door.

  39. The Prepper says:

    My fiancee has been making a number of recipes from her south book recipes book, and some of them are killer! If you are looking to eat food that tastes good and is healthy, here are two tips I’ve learned from her. When you make spaghetti, use a spaghetti squash instead of pasta. It tastes WAY better than noodles IMHO, and it’s actually good for you. Second, when you make potatoes consider using cauliflower instead of potatoes. You can steam the cauliflower, mash it and then make mashed potatoes just like you would with spuds. I’m a meat and potatoes kinda guy, but some of the healthy things she’s cooked have been 5 star amazing. Anyone else have any tips on how to cook healthy amazing food?

    • I consider some of my curries to be amazingly healthy. Lots of tomatoes, the november ones tend to include butternut or acorn squash, sometimes the yogurt cultures don’t get hot enough to die, or it’s appropriate to kill the heat with cold yogurt. We tend to use my stupid canned turkey for protein, since it can’t be overcooked after being overcooked.

      I’m on-board with mashed cauliflower, especially with heavy garlic, but spaghetti squash is something I’d only choke down if it was my biggest meal of the day during desperate times. Over-boiled and ground, spaghetti squash might be suitable to thicken stew.

      • Kelekona,

        What kinds of curries do you make? Please tell. I really don’t care for canned meat. But if the taste can be masked with a good curry, . . . Please tell. Or refer me to a couple of websites that are authentic.

        • For just about all of the recipes, when you add the canned meat depends on whether or not you want it to completely break up and disappear. I’ve only experimented with canned bird, and that’s usually white meat.

          http://norecipes.com/blog/karei-raisu-japanese-curry-rice/ Is not authentic, but a good recipe.

          My variations are based on a European version. It’s pretty much adding ingredients to a frying pan in order of how much time they need to cook, finishing off with yogurt, sour cream, or coconut milk.

          There is onion, raw pennied carrots, green pepper, and skinned tomatoes. Another is onion then roasted squash mashed into roasted or canned tomatoes. There is another variation which uses a frozen vegetable mix like http://www.galleriaortiz.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/10/Frozen-Vegetables.jpg which is better with a tumeric-heavy spice mix to make it very yellow, and actually might be nice with ham or spam or fish.

          Cheaper curries we have with tumeric rice. Higher-end curries we have with fresh naan bread.

          One of our best curries was based on an episode of good eats. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ndt6VzHH44s We soak chunks of pork shoulder in spiced yogurt and then line the cast-iron pan with foil and pre-heat it while getting the oven very hot.

          We make masala from scratch by toasting whole spices and running it through a coffee grinder.

          2 TBS Cardamom seeds
          2 TBS Coriander seeds
          2 TBS Black peppercorns
          1 TBS Cumin
          1 TBS brown mustard seeds
          2-inch cinnamon stick
          A few Arbol Chilies, some still with seeds.

          • Kelekona,

            Thanks for the information. I have a book called 50 Great Curries of India by Camellia Panjabi and have made a couple of the recipes from that. I like the coconut curries and the vindaloo. I make a lot of chutney and will serve chicken with chutney on the side with a side dish of onion and cucumber in yogurt and cardamom.

            I will check out the websites.

  40. recoveringidiot says:

    Nothing during the week for me but work and lots of windshield time. I did have a pretty good day today, I drove to the closest Sams club bought a membership and spent about an hour shopping. I want my money back, it was disappointing to see most of the stuff was bulk junk. I did get a 25 lb bag of rice and some canned chicken. Not a bag of dried beans in the whole place.

    After the disappointing first effort in Sams club I went to a gun show in the same town and picked up a 500 rd box of 62gr federal .556 for $140, wish I’d had more cash I thought that was a bargain after the prices I’ve seen lately. I went looking for #4 buck in 2 3//4 12 gauge but not a box was to be found.

    Question for the gunnies, I would like to get a .22 pistol to use as a trainer for the 1911. I checked out the Sig 1911-22, it feels good but I don’t know anybody that actually has one and what I read is kinda mixed. I would love to hear some first hand experiences before I spend that kind of money on what I consider a .22 trainer.

    MD, glad your readership is increasing, hope it means some more bucks for you! I skim other sites but read only this one. Hope your new place is coming along well, I’m finally getting settled in after moving. Thank God for a mild winter so far as I have been tardy in fixing the heating situation in the new place(the central unit is dead and I’m not going to fix it), I have been getting by with a small infrared gas wall heater but if we had a real winter I’d be a little cold. I have another heater but have procrastinated on crawling under the house to do the install. I think I’ll hire one of the good teenagers (skinny) here to help me so I don’t crash my bad back/neck.

    My BiL goes for a heart valve next week, please pray for him.

    Hope everyone has a great week!

    • Texas Nana says:

      Recoveringidiot
      Praying for you BIL
      Our local Sams normally has dried pintos in a 10# and 50# bags, but the 4-6 weeks they have not had either. I didn’t ask why, but I will check the next time I’m there and report back.
      In December we were in the Huntsville, Al area, the sam’s there had pinto in 50# bags only.

    • riverrider says:

      r, ruger 22/45 is a good trainer and grocery getter too. like the mark 2, but with controls like the 1911. very accurate to boot. and it can be had with threaded barrel if you ever want to add a suppressor for quiet meat getting. runs about 300.00 in my area.

    • I have a Ciener 22 conversion kit for my 1911. They run about $300. This way I have the same grip feel and trigger that I would be used to when firing regular ammo.
      A reminder, with the springs that they have to use, you need to use the slide safety to reholster the weapon.
      Now these kits only work on the 45 ACP versions, the 9mm and 40 S&W have a different feed ramp set up so the conversions won’t work.

    • R. Idiot,

      Sam’s Club will give you two cards per membership. If you are not using your second card, sell it to a friend–both of you would get half price memberships.

    • just finished prayers for your BIL. take care

    • mountain lady says:

      Will keep your BIL in my prayers.

    • recoveringidiot says:

      Thanks for the prayers! It means a lot to me.

      Gayle, I’m going to give my sister the other card. I’m going to try another couple of stores while I’m traveling for work and if they don’t have more of the things I’m looking for I’ll sell or give my card to someone else. My sister can shop at the commissary on Fort Bragg and she tells me its a better deal than Sams but she has to drive 1 1/2 hour to get to Bragg vs the closest Sams at 25 min. Gas is really going up here some places are already at 3.75 so she may enjoy the card.

      Nasty WX here today, maybe I’ll do some much needed house cleaning;^(

      • recoveringidiot says:

        I forgot to blabber about the new 1100, functions fine and the perceived recoil a little less than the pump gun. The extended mag tube don’t line up real well with the nut/tube on the gun so the sixth shell tries to hang up going into the magazine. I talked to my favorite machinist/gun plumber and he says he has fixed a few by extending the thread on the the tube a bit so it can mate up closer to the one on the gun. When we can get together he will run his bore scope in the tube to see how well they mate and decide then if the extra thread will help or not. It works but you have to play with the shell that pushes the one past the junction of mag tubes to get it to go. Don’t seem to affect the function at all. I wonder if it might be the cheap plastic follower Remington is using?

        • riverrider says:

          alot of folks complain about that follower. midway sells a steel one.

        • recoveringidiot⁠, I have heard complaints about tee plastic follower. I suggest look for a metal one. I have metal on mine, but its older.

          • Jarhead o3. My stepdad has a winchester model 12 that is made out of nickel steel. Not a bit of plastic or anything metric on that gun.

      • R. Idiot,

        You can log on to Sam’s Club, select a location and see if they have what you are looking for at a specific store. I like Sam’s Club because their price on things like flour and sugar are the best in town. Also, on the Sam’s Club website, you can order all kinds of food storage stuff–powered eggs, fd or dehydrated fruits and veggies.

        • recoveringidiot says:

          Thanks Gayle, I had not thought of checking their online site.

          Does Costco require a membership? I drive by one location about once a month but never stop.

          • Costco does require a membership. I think mine is $49 a year. Each membership is for two members.

    • robert in mid michigan says:

      sams is for thier website, cant beet their prices on survival foods. believe it is augeson farms a lot cheaper than if you bought from them directly.

  41. My poor Koi got tail rot. So I went to get some Fishmox for them [100 count 250 mg amoxicillian] the price had jumped from $17.69 to $29.99. A little shopping turned up some at the old price. So if you think your fish might get tail rot try to catch some at the old price. Please note that this is NOT FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION. Read the instructions and pay no mind to the many internet assertions this is the same as human antibiotic. Repeat if you are goimg to stock this before the price increase gets to all stores, it’s ONLY for your fish. Fish with tail rot don’t get invited to play all the little Koi games, it’s quite embarrasing really it is.

    • Azyogi,

      You are being facetious, right?

      • No I would never disobey or advocate disobeying senseless government regulations and depriving greedy corporations of unjust profits, merely for personal health or security concerns. Still I worry about the rising cost of taking care of my fish, my cats are so fond of them.

    • azyogi…understood…

      that is why I ordered all mine in one order…and Gayle also noticed last week that Amazon no longer stocks it…

      so, thanks for the heads up for those who don’t yet have something for their Koi. cheers.

    • azyogi, my poor little Koi is sick too. Where did you find the cheaper amoxicillin?

    • This is funny. When I first read your comments, I thought, “Hmmm! That’s odd. I thought azyogi was smarter than that!”. But, then , I read about your poor little Koi’s embarrassment with his appendage decomposition; and, I understand your deep concern for him. I agree with you. It is our duty to provide only the best of care for anything that is that far down on the food chain.

      • Azyogi and Ozarkanna,

        I am so lost with this conversation–did someone catch VD and order fish antibiotics because his appendage was rotting off? What the hell are ya’ll taking about?

        • Gayle… I am laughing so hard can barely type – and every-time I look up at your post -just sets me off again…

          are you serious, or just teasing Azyogi and Ozarkanna…

          You guys all have the best sense of humour…

  42. My dh took his motorcycle out today and had to put gas in–the high quality gas. He paid over $4 per gallon. He came home and was in shock. I reminded him of an article in the local paper we read that said gas would be $4 by spring and $6 by summer. He drew the implication that milk would go up to $5 a gallon. And said, “We would have to start mixing real milk with powered milk.” That was the perfect opening for me to say, “Perhaps I should order more powered milk.”

    Two more cases on the way.

    With my new home dairy aspirations, I was wondering how I could get away with ordering more powered milk.

  43. Heads Up: Publix and Kelloggs Cereal

    Saturday and Sunday only: Publix has Kelloggs cereal 50 percent off. We just got back from Pubix and we picked up 30 boxes of miscellaneous cereals.

    The sweet kid’s cereal makes great snacks. And cereal has a shelf life of two years.

    • Gayle, Thanks for the tip on the cereal, I had overlooked the sale until you mentioned it. I went to Publix today, loaded up my shopping cart with $30.00 worth of cereal, used a $1.00 off coupon and a $5.00 off coupon Publix sent in the mail.

      • MareBear,

        It seems so rare these days that you can get real food for half price. Most of the sales are for condiments or weird stuff.

  44. Yesterday I bought a Katadyn Vario Microfilter for water filtration. I’m new to prepping and have budget limitations, but I’m trying to invest a little bit each week. I also bought six 5 gallon buckets and I’m working to set up a system to catch rainwater from my gutters.

    Baby steps.

  45. I should have picked up the free almanac while being disappointed in the farmer’s market. I did learn that april 15 is the official no-frost date, but it’s probably safe to push end-of-march. I want to be a localvore and a food snob, but I have low price threshold. My standards are non-existent with organic, 4x price makes me think that pesticides are good; I’m just hoping that it’s narrow market and regulations artificially raising the price, rather than having a realistic model of how less-intervention farming would make food too expensive.

    I agreed to move the chest freezer inside. I really should contact the company that promo-ed it to us to see if they have the key for it, but I’m finding an outdoor freezer inconvenient anyway.

    Still coming to terms with how little my habitual / ancestral techniques work for me in this new environment. My big “OMFG panic the world is ending and I don’t want to admit that I want to go down with it” problems are… This may be my last chance to get proper glasses, I should gently pester the hubby about getting a beer-friendly propane stove before going paranoid on him and demanding some sort of propane heat source,

    and I forget the third thing but it might have something to do with needing more food that can be eaten cold while perched on playground equipment to escape the flood waters while shivering in the rain.

    That and I’m coming to terms with how I’m probably going to die whether I want to or not. If I become a successful zombie, I’m going to die of shame in that.

    • Kelekona,

      Take a deep breath. There is only so much we can do in a week. And unfortunately in the real world we need to balance eating healthy with the increasing cost of food. You wrote about your ancestral techniques. Any chance you would elaborate on that? (I love preparing foods from all around the world. My dh will eat just about anything I put in front of him. So I get to do a lot of experimenting.)

      • Ah, ancestral refers to habits I learned from the rest of my family, and most of them are probably from the Great Depression. Non-practically, we’ve been terrible hoarders, saving everything that has a possible use to the point where we couldn’t possibly use it all.

        About the most practical thing is that having a small stockpile of food is habitual and normal and absolutely having to go to the store for the next meal would drive me nuts. It’s so we never have to worry about battling the snows for food; we don’t want to be among those who scurry out for supplies as the storm is starting, and we skip the ritual of trying to placate the gods of winter with french toast.

        But it barely snows here. The only reason to stay inside is that some people can’t wrap their heads around the concept of slick road conditions. There are hurricanes, but it seems sheltered enough that it shouldn’t take a whole week to get things halfway functional again.

    • Kelekona-
      Please don’t sound so down. The fact that you are watching the news, reading between the lines, and putting together contingency plans for yourself and your family puts you ahead of 95% of the general population. We have no way to see the future, and though we can make some educated guesses about what it will look like, what will really happen and when it will all go down are anybody’s guess.
      Keep your mind open, keep prepping, keep learning, and keep posting. Every day, you are more ready than you were the day before.
      Blessings,
      Cat

      • Actually, I can honestly say that I’m being paranoid for no good reason. Many of the things that seem to bother the rest of the people here ping my belief-node the same as honest-to-truth zombies shambling around. Or maybe my stupid brain is a coward and won’t take anything seriously for me.

        I just gave economic collapse some very serious thought and realized that there is probably a diabolical plan that will set in motion once they’ve managed to completely destabilize the current order. Some corporation will step in, shove the government aside, and offer to feed us in return for selling ourselves into slavery. (That or many people will die as we re-learn how it was done in simpler times.)

        At least I can believe in Katrina-like events. There will be some place to go. There’s just logistics of when to go, how to get there, and what to do once there.

    • kelekona..that is so funny…I too have those moments of clarity when I see the enormity and required scale of prepping when I can finally say I am ‘ready’.

      The reality is, that when SHTF – I will probably have to do into overdrive…

      as what we are doing now, driving around in our clean fueled up cars, on mostly well-maintained roads, and filling available trolleys with all manner of canned/bottled foods – that may not be available, or the prices will be out of my reach…

      so, yes, I had a chuckle -I so identified with your train of thought. till next time.

    • Vienna (Soggy prepper) says:

      Bwahahah! I enjoyed that Kelekona! I had that panic this week too. Although we are on a hill, everyone below us will flood, but there is a school at the bottom of our hill. I’m now picturing people on the monkey bars!

      Breath. Breath.

      DH came home from the gun show Sunday, he hadn’t found anything he was looking for. However he had an odd look so I asked what”s up. My Dh is NOT someone who is overly excitable, or exaggerates or hits the OMFG panic button as you illustrated (I hit that often). He said he had never seen the gun show so packed (he goes monthly) and when he arrived there were pallets full of ammo. When he left they were empty, in just a couple hours. He said it made him think somethin’ big is comin’.

      Which made me have to…breath…. BREATH. But he said I could get a rocket stove now. :)

      The zenni glasses website does NOT need a current prescription btw. So even if you can’t get to an eye dr for a current prescription you can get new glasses.

      • Repair Mama says:

        I wish my DH would have a OMFG moment and let me go nuts on prepping!!!
        I just dont know what it would take for him though?
        enjoy the rocket stove…..order it fast before he changes hismind
        take care
        happy prepping!!

        • cosmolined says:

          Repair Mama:
          Have him watch the move “The Pianist”. Folks in Poland also refused to accept reality. You are doing fine Lady. Hang in there!!!!! Cos

  46. Didn’t do much on prepping this week. Spent some time with the wife this week. Our work schedules don’t come close to leaving time at home.

    Last week picked up a #10 can of broccoli, some ammo and TP.

    • Followup: Got to talk to a nice lady at a gun show. She sells heirloom seeds for all zones but at the shows focuses on ones that have been tested for Texas. Bought a nice book from her on square foot gardening.

      http://www.texasready.net/

  47. Candy In Nebraska says:

    This week my Middle Daughter paid us off for the mini van she bought from us so I used that money to buy the extra stuff we haven’t been able to buy in months.

    bought lamp oil
    1 gal propane bottles
    gal sz zip-lock bags
    quart sz ziplock bags
    ink cartridges for printer
    printer paper
    shower curtians
    3 months of batteries for mothers hearing aid
    batteries reg
    coffee filters
    ink pens
    suspenders
    a very heavy canvas coat for myself
    chicken feed
    2 compasses

    prolly more but can’t remember.

    added more shelving to the pantry and atarting to re-organize it and invitoring it. Printed off more recipes and how tos. and read the blog here.

  48. I took advantage of the balmy weather we had today and fixed the bottom stair on my porch. It’s cement – I just mocked up a form from a piece of plywood and some corrugated plastic signs, and propped them up with bricks. Knocked out what was loose, and poured on top of what was left. Not a perfect job but it’ll probably last the rest of the year at least.

    I also got a big pot to transplant my citrus tree into. I’ve been told the reason it’s never gotten busy is that it’s rootbound.

    The rest of the week was just computer stuff and laundry. I backed up my e-book collection to hard media.

    • cosmolined says:

      Penny Pincher:
      I’m a journeyman Concrete Finisher among other things. Next time break off the loose stuff, then form it. Before you place
      fresh concrete dampen the old steps. If you have access to pure
      cement, make a toothpaste like mix of pure cement with water.
      Then paint it onto the old concrete. This will increase the bonding of the repair. They also sell a white bonding glue for
      just this purpose but it’s pricey and the cement will work almost
      as well. Cos

  49. Hi again, Wolfpack. Just found a book that looks really good:
    http://www.lastpilgrims.com/
    Not sure if it is on anyone’s radar yet, but from some of the comments I read, I think it may have come out of a very successful fan fic from the Jericho series.
    I’m a glutton for good fic… sounds like a good book to fill the evenings while I’m at conference next week.
    I’ll submit a review for anyone interested by Monday or so!
    Have a good evening,
    Cat

  50. Repair Mama says:

    Well, this week has not been really productive. Not much money came in this week. I did make some food purchases though. I found whole pork loins for $1.59 per lb and purchased 2 of them. I cut about 30 boneless pork chops out of each of them. wrapped in x2 chops in wax paper and food savered them. They are now chillin’ in the deep freezer. I think I will try to get 2 or 3 more and do some canning.
    Picked up some seasonings at the dollar general store. The last time they were all 2 for a 1.00. Now some of them have went up to .75 each so I got 8 of the seasoned meat tenderizer, and went ahead and paid the higher price for the garlic powder and the onion powder. We use a lot of these three as well as some others.
    At walmart, I purchased the last of the dickie’s insulated hooded jackets that they had for 9.50 after 50% off. I will add it to the ones that I got earlier. Picked up 4 more boxes of baking soda and 15lbs of beans. I will still be looking for a bulk of butter beans., I am set for pintos, but will be adding some other beans to try to keep from having to eat the same ones over and over. I need to get an order in for some more mylar bags or try to slip off to the LDS cannery. I am saving my change and loose dollars for that trip. I would like to purchase some canned up stuff that will just go straight into closet without having to mylar it up.. I will use the mylar and o2 obsorbers for some other stuff I have here at home.
    Have been looking through some of my sewing stuff to see what I will need to add if I cant get anything for a number of years. I like to sew, but just dont have much time to do anything, but if SHTF, I may be at home more with more time on my hands to fix and repair what I cant afford to buy anymore.
    I spent tonight installing a new lavatory faucet in the bathroom the old one starting dripping and needed to be replaced. I got one that has a moveable spout that is much higher, so I can fill containers with water in there if I need to .. Next I will get a faucet for the kitchen that has a hi spout as well.
    I am getting more worried about the crap on the news and alternative media that MSM is not covering. I have not been able to do any couponing to bulk up the stores and have not had much money to get much. I have been seeing lots of bare spots on the shelves in the store and walmart, and cant seem to put my finger on exactly what is happening. It is too late in the month to lay it on welfare checks and food stamps. Most of the food stamp people get their $$ before the 11th of the month. been watching oil bob around and go up once again to 103.00 barrell. Gold is still above 1700.00 and silver around 33.00
    I try to watch the currencies but dont know exactly how to figure out what the currency markets are showing. I feel the need to finish up prepping as fast as possible, but cant manage it just right now. I dont know when things are gonna pop, and I was discussing with the guy that works for us that I am not worried about the mayan calander ending the world in Dec, but i am worried about what kind of panic will come if it and what some people may do. I dont think it will be safe to be out anywhere in december. I am already afraid to go to the city and go to the mall. I wont even be caught at a concert or anywhere where lots of people congregate. I just dont know.
    Hope everyone stays safe and can stack it high and deep. I just got a bad feeling.
    take care

    • Repair Mama,

      I too can’t seem to figure out why the shelves are either bare or front loaded (the products are neatly pushed to the front of the shelf to give the appearance of fullness). My best guess is that stores have cut back on labor to restock the shelves. But that doesn’t strike me as plausible. Another explanation is that stores are waiting until the shelves are completely empty before restocking–manufactures are shrinking packages and if you have two different size packages that are the same price, folks might catch on.

      Does anyone have any theories on this?

    • repair mama, i’ve noticed at the grocery stores i shop at (there are three), the stores have very few customers. i usually go between 7 and 10 in the mornings and at times there are only one or two of us shopping.

    • granny mae says:

      repair mamma,
      Don’t get scared yet. Just be smart. When you go shopping go with someone and do it in the daytime not at ight. My worry is having car trouble at night so when it is close to evening I stay home. You are right to be concerned. Don’t worry about what you don’t have, just make a list and then keep putting one foot in front of the other as long as possible. I am not afraid for myself but I am scared to death for certain members of my family that won’t listen to me. I made my last attempt last week to offer to sow them how to can and dehydrate and they turned me down so I wil not bother again. After 15 years of trying to get them to listen , I am all through. I have no more time for idiots. My children are well preped and one of them is having a lot of trouble trying to remain calm. I keep telling them once you are prepared you don’t have to worry any longer. It is hard for some people not to worry. My thoughts are you can only do what you can only do, but you don’t know what you can do until you try. Since I am prepared I will continue to help them get prepared too. Just keep a diary of the things you see at the stores and the pumps. It will come in handy some day when others need to prepare and there is no-one with experience to help them. We are stacking it high and deep ! God Bless !

      • Repair Mama says:

        My fear of crowded places is not for individual crime. I dont want some crazy ass with a bomb ot biologic agent to kill me and a munch of other people. I am a very big girl. toss heavy equipment and do repair and service for a living. I have no intentions of ever being a victom.
        But weird and crazy people that kill others in an extremist form of religion scare the hell out of me. I will stay strong but stay away from those places if I can.
        Thanks for being here to help all of us along. We need to stick together to make it through whatever comes. learning to survive and thrive.
        God Bless you.
        take care and thank you.

  51. SurvivorDan says:

    Congratulations MD.
    So much tripe and fluff out there that as more and more folks sample your site they realize the great quality of the information available at thesurvivalistblog.net and make it a favorite and often THE favorite site. MD Creekmore and the knowledgeable and comradely WolfPack …….what’s not to like?
    People are waking up to the need to prepare and gravitating to the “the survival blog with advice that works”. Many more will come this year.
    Great job MD.

  52. This is too cool !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    http://www.ammocanstove.com/products.html

  53. I thought about all the preppers out there when I went into Walmart. There is a big cardboard bin in the center aisle that has incredible prices on health items–decongestant, allergy, prilosec generic, cough meds, etc. I bought a pill splitter for $.88 and went to the regular section. The identical pill splitter is $4.18. An employee and I took them from their boxes and compared.

  54. hello to one and all…have had a busy week,

    lots of thrift shop buying, e.g.,
    2 woollen underlay blankets,
    sleeping bags,
    assorted clothes,
    boots,
    citronella tea light candles
    more candles
    cutlery and serving utensils…
    more assorted sized s/less steel pots and pans…many sharp knives, large glass wide mouth bottles/jars with screw top metal lids.
    2 backpacks $5 each – for more BOB’s – going to get these filled up as well.

    And lots of suitcases to store them in until I can take them to ‘plan b’ site.

    More paper towels, shower gel and shampoo/conditioner.

    Still vacuum sealing rice into coffee cans.

    Assorted fish hooks in packets – all reduced to .50c packet.

    large tins of dog food – to be eventually mixed with cooked rice/rehydrated veges and stock cubes for DD’s critters.

    Stationery reduced – so got a big stack of whatever was on special, including pens, pencils, notebooks, 5 subject notebooks etc, staplers, sharpies.

    dollar store…bought all their .50c lighters, and 6 flashlights for $2 ea (3 ‘AAA’ batteries).

    have rain checks for 425gms tuna $3.99each, and chux superwipes pack of 10 for $1.99 (this is 50% off).

    Our shelves are no longer stacked like before…used to always have to weave around boxes of stuff on floor, ready for night stacker to put them on shelves…

    now, I am always asking if they have certain items at the back etc…the answer I am given is that the orders for each store come from head office, and they have no control on what/or how much arrives at each store – so thank goodness for rain checks.

    my order from NORCAL ray arrived (solar flashlights) and a gift from Ray – a folding knife. SIL was here changing my fuel filter on my m/bike…and could not seem to put the knife down…

    My family and I had another briefing regarding our procedure – went through things while we were having lunch…DD shopped while she was here…so good that I can get all items on special…and we all benefit.

    More TP
    large / medium garbage bags.
    rolled oats
    wooden matches…all that I see on the shelf.
    snaplock bags
    5 tubes toothpaste
    diet lite salt (50% sodium/potassium chloride).
    oven bags
    spaghetti sauce – jars
    assorted spam cans
    small container geletine.

    pharmacy – best price on 500mls Betadine $12.99 – reduced from $19.50. (Feed store has it at $21.50).
    mercurochrome
    small s/less steel scissors
    sterile dressings – assorted
    hydrogen peroxide.
    Tea tree oil, bandaids…
    combantrim worming tabs (when DD gives the dogs their de-worming treatment – we de-worm ourselves as well…DD pays for the dogs – I pay for the 3 of us.
    assorted panadol, aspirin tabs.

    Am off to the big smoke either Monday or Tuesday…away for a few days – re-sign lease on one of properties…

    and check out restaurant supplier –

    and will check out thrift shops while am there…

    also want to call into uni bookshop…for more scalpels, sutures, suture removers/cutters etc…so, if I don’t post – don’t worry…will catch up.

    Also, more military ration packs to collect off a friend.

    Saratoga Prepper…hope you are up on your feet and recovering well from your surgery…

    Anyone who is sick…best wishes for speedy recovery…

    Great to hear visitor numbers are on the rise…welcome to all the new preppers.

    MD, hope you have fully recovered from the flu…makes me appreciate my good health all the more when I am well..

    till next time…

    • granny mae says:

      Chloe,
      I’m interrested in how you vacuum seal the rice in coffee cans. Never heard of it but sounds good. Could you give dirrections on ow to do it please ? Do you have topoke a hole in the top and then tape over it ? Sounds like you have been busy ! God Bless.

      • hi granny mae…I use metal cans that originally contained coffee or milo etc…do you have similar cans on your side – like your #10 cans I think – going by the pictures on some websites – with the wide lids.

        I cut off almost twice the length (off a foodsaver roll) of the can I am going to use – enough to allow bag to still seal.

        I then seal one end of the foodsaver bag, and then insert the sealed end into the clean and dry metal can.

        Then I pour in either rice/rolled oats/pasta/powdered milk etc – leaving about one inch (1″) space inside the can to allow for remainder of foodsaver bag to be folded in… and then place lid on – waterproof/vermin proof.

        I have the can just below the level of the food saver…or contents will begin to slide out and make lid difficult to close…

        then just set it to vac seal…write on side/top of can the contents/date packaged – and good for many years.

        And, with a keyhole can opener…can later use the can as a large hobo stove to cook the contents – using yet another similar can as the cook pot.

        Today I also finished off vac sealing all the rice/pasta/milk powder – and vac sealed iodised salt in the smaller cans…and also vac sealed some wooden matches, still in their cardboard cases – into the cans.

        This method does use up more of the foodsaver bags, however..no need for large buckets to store them in.

        And I can then add one can of either rice/pasta – as a base for a meal – to a BOB.

        Could vac seal smaller one meal size rice/lentils/pasta/beans etc and then place all individually sealed packs into one large can…this is what I carry in my car’s BOB now.

        Does take extra time…however, I only need enough for one person/meal at a time.

        When I get back home, I can see immediately the empty food saver bags – and what has to be restocked…and I then re-use the bags to re-seal other small items.

        Hope this helped…got an early start tomorrow morning…but just had to see what everyone was up to…cheers.

        • granny mae…just re-read my post…need to clarify..

          1. seal one end of foodsaver bag…ensure cut length long enough to allow for vac sealing.
          2. insert bag with sealed end into can.
          3. fill with desired dry goods etc – leave one inch space at top.
          4. vac seal food saver bag.
          5. now fold in top of foodsaver bag into space at top of can.
          6. place lid on and mark contents/date on side/lid.
          7. waterproof/vermin proof – and if dropped e.g., during an earthquake…no worries..just a dent – contents still ok.

          10pm Monday 20 Feb…cheers.

    • SaratogaPrepper says:

      chloe
      I returned home from the hospital Sunday. Doing pretty good considering what was done to me. Glad to have all those tubes removed (ONE I hope to never have again). Getting around fairly well with my walker, that makes me feel real old. Prepping is going to be limited to doing a lot of reading since I can’t bend past 90 degrees for the next 12 weeks or there is a posibility the new hip could “pop” out. Luckily I have 2 fantastic women taking of me.
      Thank You for thinking of me

      • SP, glad you made it through and recovering!
        Relax and get better, read and maybe print up for the prep binder.

        • SaratogaPrepper says:

          Jarhead 03
          That’s exactly what I plan on doing. I’m sending the DW to Staples today to pick up a few reams of paper, binders and extra ink cartridges so I can catch up on all those articles I’ve been meaning to print out. Also plan on digging through M.D.’s CD that I picked up a few months ago. The wealth of information in there should keep me busy for a long time.

      • Copperhead says:

        SP, glad to see that you are home! Hope the surgery went o.k. I totally know what you mean by ALL the tubes!! :)))
        Take care..take your meds so you can move better and keep on moving. I know that part is hard but seems each day gets a bit better, with just a day or two thrown in that you feel like crap! It does get much better.
        We’re glad to have you back and on the mend.

      • Saratoga Prepper,

        Glad to hear you are home from the hospital and are being taken care of by your family.

      • s/prepper…good to hear you are back in your own house/bed etc..nothing beats having your own comforts around you.

        At least having had the surgery – you can now put that concern behind you.

        Think of all the net surfing you can do.

        Please keep us informed of your recovery…and no breaking the speed limit in the house – keep that walker in 1st gear only…

        Till next time.

      • Glad to hear you cam through without a hitch. Sounds like a plan on printing pages IS prepping, so you’re good.

  55. We are building a new bedroom, bathroom, and walk-in closet onto our house! That will free up a little space for preps. Should be finished by early April. Looking forward to getting into my laundry room and organizing what I have. I’ve been trying to rotate but Old Arthur has set up residence in my right shoulder and it’s hard to bend and lift flats of cans to look at dates. Sigh.

    About Auguson Farms–I have seen their products online, but none of the stores near me (three within 100 miles) actually carry them in the store. Am I going to have to order online? Are their products good? We are thinking about some of the heirloom seeds.

    DH has a big garden and it’s his pride and joy, as well as his Therapy Center! He planted sweet potatoes for the first time last summer and due to the extended and extreme heat they didn’t do very well, but we did get a few. He’s got it all dug up ready to plant onions, broccoli, peas, and all the early veggies in a couple of weeks. He does all of his work by hand–shovel, rake, and hoe–no rototiller. He’s too cheap to rent one and they’re expensive to buy. Even in the winter, he is out digging, digging, digging if the weather is decent at all. Like I say, it’s his therapy, and prayer time too. Garden & God–better than any psychiatrist!

    • MamaBetsy,

      What part of the country do you live in? I live in Florida and sweet potatoes do well in the heat and humidity here. What are you looking to order from Augason Farms? If you need basic staples, check out this link:

      http://store.lds.org/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/Category3_715839595_10557_21158_-1_N_image_0

      If you want more selection, check out EE:

      http://beprepared.com/Default.asp?

      Or Honeyville

      http://store.honeyvillegrain.com/

      • Thank you so much, Gayle. We live in the south central plains area and got hit with 100+ temps and severe draught for over 50 days last summer starting around June 20. It was just too much for our garden, and we lost almost everything we planted after April. We only got a total of 3 small tomatoes from almost 100 plants. I am going to start looking into online ordering of some heirloom seeds, hoping for a more normal summer this year. We will try the sweet potatoes again as well. SURELY we wouldn’t have two summers in a row like last year!

        • MamaBetsy,

          Did you amend your soil with compost or cow manure?

          • Judy, another one says:

            Gayle, there was nothing any of us could have done to save our gardens last summer in our area. Even folks who watered lost their gardens.

            MamaBetsy, it is possible to have another lousy year for gardening. However the ponds are full so I’m taking that as a sign that we will have a decent year for gardens.

            And on the issue of amending the soil for sweet potatoes like Irish potatoes do not get too wild with enriching the soil or all you will end up with is lots of vines and no tubers. Good subsoil moisture is the key to growing sweet potatoes and we didn’t have any last year.

            • Judy,

              Thanks for the explanation. This will be my first year growing sweet potatoes. I got the starter potatoes from an 1800s farm (now state park) that is just down the road. I have high hopes for my garden this year.

    • granny mae says:

      mamma Betsy,

      So it is ! I agree !

    • cosmolined says:

      Mama Betsy:
      I’d look into a rental. In one day I rototilled about 1200 square feet to a depth of about a foot for less than $50. It did require a pickup to get it here though. Cos

  56. Shoud have said “none of the SAM’S stores near me”–we do have more than three stores in our area, ha ha! But there are THREE Sam’s stores within 100 miles!

  57. Case of Yoders Bacon
    Ordered more 6 gal buckets, liners and Oxy Aborbers
    Finished & Test fired new AR

  58. That’s a great achievement to have almost 18,000 active readers. This was the first prepper blog that I read everyday some 3 or 4 years ago. I now read about a dozen a day, including this one. This speaks to the reality that prepping and survival are gaining in popularity.
    I can tell you that in the retail position I hold that deals with home repair, hardware and related items, more and more people are coming in openly looking for prep items. This was unheard of only a few years ago.
    On one hand this is a good thing, in that more people are getting prepared. On the other hand, it says that more people are expecting something bad to happen.

  59. Prep Now [so.fl.] says:

    We added 20 ft. more gutter to our gutter garden for lettuce and kale.
    Bought 2 doz. more canning jars.
    Armadillos have been digging up my beds that I just planted with romaine, spinach, collards and bell peppers plants. Also digging around and in the squash and cucumber and bean sprouts.
    Ate home grown gr.beans for the first time in decades this week.
    The mangoes, avocados, lemons, papaya, pomegranate, bananas, and star fruit trees are all in bloom. The tomatoes are heavy on the vine.
    My son is finally trying to get his own garden started!,, and he planted some fruit trees this week!
    Made some home ground and extruded pasta last night. Much richer and filling than the store bought white pasta.

  60. Bought:
    Another 10-22 magazine
    200 rounds of CCI .22, half hollowpoints
    Another 5Gal Gas can to fill and rotate bringing the stock to 30 gal.

    worked on about 100 223 cases.
    cast about 100 various 30 cal & .40 cal bullets
    Worked on sighting in the scope on the Mosin Nagant M44

    kept on keepin on……

  61. Ridge Runner says:

    Congratulations M.D. on the growing popularity of the blog and other efforts.

    -Doubled the size of one box garden.
    -Planted more tomatoes, peppers, spring onions, lettuce, cucs, basil and dill. (better late than never)
    -Ordered a case of freeze dried mixed vegetables from Emergency Essentials.
    -Bought a Crimson Trace sight for my Ruger LC9. First laser sight I’ve ever owned. Kinda cool.

  62. Super quiet week in terms of buying anything, other then getting a couple hundred pds of on sale dog an cat food, and ten dollars worth of fresh food, we spent nothing else this week.

    DH is coming up on his 40th B-Day in early march, and I have been after him about what he would like, finally got a answer yesterday, he wants a cross-bow, and didn’t seem unhappy at all, when I said, “Me too” right? So we can practise together right?

    Otherwise, it was a straight up farm week, I didn’t even get off it once, Hubby picked up the feed on the way home from work, saving gas and all that..

    I have dried about 40 pds of potatos this week and about 30 pds of sqaush that is starting to go from storage, tapped some tree’s, made some maple syrup, built a new nest box for chickens, did some small critter butchering, pressure canned some potato, some lamb, a few rabbit.

    My pullets are starting to lay, so I am very happy about having more eggs in the house, I have started doing some winter pruning on the fruit tree’s and the grape vines. We had a few warm above 0 days, so moved a few rabbits around and cleaned and sanitized down some of the outdoor pens, and rebedded them down and breed the does for spring litters.

    Transplanted some of the seedlings into their own bigger pots that will in a few weeks head out to the green house for grow out.

    Continued to work on knitting, sewing projects, and otherwise, spring cleaned.. Got the River Cottage Meat Book by Hugh Fearnley-whittingstall, it took 3 months from order to arrive..but its a interesting read so far..

    Yup, it was a very quiet week on the farm, now I need to go read what the rest of the pack is up to..

    • farmgal…the amount of prep / stuff / animal care you manage is amazing…at least I only deal with stuff – you have animals that need constant care…good on you…cheers.

      • Hi Chloe

        Thanks for your kind comments, I have read what you do, and its clear that you keep very busy as well..

        I had to chuckle the other day, my “old fashioned” older brother has a good size pantry and alot of things that would be considered “prepper” items, of course he called them living in the north, hunting and camping stuff, plus a Hunting camp, that would make a fine bug-out place to go..

        Well, he works long hours, typically 12 plus a day, and so he does not often get to the store, well this past week, his wife was down visiting my mom as the grandchildren had a week off school and he phoned her, and said, I just went to the store and spent 210 dollars and walked out with 2 bags for goodness sakes..

        To which she said, I told you! that the prices are going up, the reply just kills me..

        “Well, I figured you just wanted something and was putting it away in the food costs” and then it was go to Costco and load the whole back of the truck before you come home, Fill the house women, Go shopping!

        Just cracked me up..

  63. Finally bit the bullet & ordered some large canned food from EE. Was trying to stock smaller cans but I got frustrated feeling I wasn’t getting anywhere. Still need to do inventory to determine just how long the food we do have will last. But I feel a little better with the other stuff on the way. Also bought several MREs & a cooking set.
    Plan on getting a few more things today like water, knives, compass & stuff for hubby ‘s get home bag. Oh and I got some info from my mom about storing dried foods so I need to pick up some jars.
    The list seems NEVER- ENDING!

  64. Two Ruger 10/22 magazines. What do you recommend using the 10/22 for?

  65. I have posted here once or twice, and I find this blog to be an invaluable resource for my prepper mind-set. thank you M.D. and thank you Wolfpack for everything.
    that being said… my preps move slowly. this is largely in part due to monetary limitations and an uncooperative DW. I admit that the overwhelming majority of my preps are “camping” and “hunting” gear, as this is acceptable to the DW. I was a professional hunting guide for 15 years, so she knows its all part of the package.
    I have been slowly working on her in other areas… the garden will be bigger and we will have our first go at canning this year.
    Our city has us on boil order regularly due to a water system that is overdue for replacement… resulting in my DW breaking the bank on Brita filters and/or gallon jugs of drinking water.
    luckily a few of her friends have jumped on the bandwagon with this (re)new(ed) couponing trend and she has been attempting to join in.
    The other day I left the computer aimed at the Berkey site (purely on accident *wink-wink) and she asked if I was seriously thinking about “spending that kind of money”. with in the next week she came home to me watching Doomsday Preppers and I refused to let her change the channel. The following week she willingly watched the next episode with me and was even asking questions/critiquing the people.
    Today we were going through the Sunday morning ritual of preparing breakfast for ourselves and the 3 year old, as well as baby food for the twins… and the power went out. A few phone calls and a quick scan of facebook told me that over 75% of the town was without power and transformers were popping left and right. The DW wants to know how long we might be with out power… I told her it would likely be a few hours, but I mention that some areas of the East coast have recently gone weeks before power was restored. With in an hour she has decided that we need to switch over to a gas or dual fuel stove/oven, invest in wood heat, and spend some tax return money on a Berkey system. Doomsday Preppers gets 2 thumbs way up in my book, for helping open this door between me and my DW.

    • Flick,

      That’s great. Don’t you just love it when something happens and the light bulb comes on? For me, it was my dh paying $4 a gallon for gasoline.

      • Gayle…topped car up when I arrived in big smoke – fuel here is $1.429 litre for unleaded.

        And I then used my 8 cents off a litre voucher.

        The local newspaper has
        2 medium seasoned/marinated chickens for $8.
        boneless pork leg roast $5.99 kgs.
        eco bacon $4.99 kgs.
        Bartlett pears – .99 cents/kgs.
        gold sweet potatoes – .99 cents/kgs
        brown onions – 10kgs for $9.99.
        zucchini 750 gms $1.99.
        red amber plums $1.99 per 1 kgs.
        beef schnitzrl $5.99 per kgs.
        T-bone steak – 10 for $20.
        lychees 1 kg – $4.99.

        while I’m at it..2011 cars – runout sale…

        hilux toyota workmate 4×2 petrol manual $22,990 driveaway.
        demo corolla ascent manual hatchback $19,990 driveaway.
        yaris yr manual hatch $14,990 driveaway
        demo prado kakadu turbo diesel $89,990 driveaway.
        demo rav 4 CV 2 WD manual + towbar $29,990 driveaway.

        just some of the prices of stuff. cheers.

    • granny mae says:

      Flick,
      Good work.LOL ! It won’t be long and DW will be leading the way. I love it. What tickles me the most is I have lived this way of life for years and years and most people are just now learning how to actually survive. You just keep up the good work and don’t forget to compliment DW on her progress, she will love you for it !

    • Flick, well done on adds to your preps and don’t worry or be concerned about what you have in camping/hunting equipment.
      That tent comes in handy if say the power is out during a rain storm or winter. Tell the little ones and the wife “let’s go camping” if you have the room, set it up in the front room with extra blankets on the bottom and top your kids will think its an adventure and dad keeps them safe. I’ve done that with nieces and nephew, it works.

      Other camping gear like a propane stove you may take can be used when the stove/oven is down or an additional water boiling/cooking source.

      Take your time and don’t break the bank,
      Anything you add is better than what you had.

  66. Bandurasbox says:

    Phew! It’s been a busy few weeks for us but we have managed to squeeze out a few dollars (getting harder and harder to do these days) to work on our supplies. I tell you, just in the past month we have noticed a considerable rise in the prices of meat and dairy products. Here’s hoping (though doubting) it will get better soon.

    This week, we managed to get the following items:

    Ammo:
    20 rds of .30-.30
    40 rds of .762 x 39
    100 rds of .45 hollow points

    Food:
    We are trying our best to keep our supplies as close as we can to our current eating habits since rice and beans everyday for weeks or months on end doesn’t seem that appealing. By no means am I going to be the gourmet cook, but it will be nice to have a good supply of what we consider “comfort foods” when needed. So, I added three cans of Red Feather Creamery Butter to the storage. Walmart has their cans of Hunts Spaghetti sauce on sale for $1.00 each and we picked up 6 of those. Also, ten more pounds each of flour and sugar.

    Of course, we added to our water supply by filling about 20 more clean and empty soda bottles. We are close to 100 of these now and we are running out of room. We are going today to look for some shelves at thrift stores in order to expand our storage area in the garage.

    Question for you guys: My kids will decide they like a cereal long enough to eat one bowl. I abhor wasting food so I’ve taken to vacuum sealing the bags of dry cereal they haven’t eaten in a couple of weeks and put this in storage. Any ideas about shelf life or practicality of doing this?

    • granny mae says:

      Bandarusbox,
      If I were you I would keep the cereal in the inside wrapper as it is treated to increase shelf life of the cereal. Then you cut the cereal bag down to the top of the cereal and put this whole thing inside the vacuum seal bag and then vacuum seal as normal. It should keep for a very long time. As for being practicle, I think I would rather do that than waste it. When TSHTF they will be very happy to eat cereal that is like what they are use to rather than , say a cooked cereal. As for storing rice, I might suggest you try some good recipes using rice. I cannot stand rice by itself but I sure do love red beans and rice or many oriental dishes of rice topped with veggies or meat and a sauce. Rice is very cheap and will keep you alive in some very hard times. Remember we are talking about HARD TIMES, not just difficult times. Also it is cheaper to package some of your storage foods in bulk yourself for instance ; I bought 2- 50 lb. bags of wheat for less than $11.00 each. I put them up at home and saved myself buko bucks ! Then too I have made sure that I have a small hand operated wheat grinder. I buy buckets from Home Depot with the sealing gaskets in the lids and place a large mylar bag inside the bucket, fill the bucket half way with wheat and place inside a oxygen absorber, then fill the bucket the rest of the way to within 3 inches of the top and place another oxygen absorber on top. Then I fold the bag smoothly on the top and with a iron set on synthetic and a board placed across the top of the bucket, I lay the edge of the bag on the board and place the iron on the edge. I seal the edge to within the width of a small plastic hose that is hooked to my vacuum sealer and I run it inside the opening I left in the bag. I seal the opening right up to the hose and then turn on the vacuum sealer and suck out as much air as I can and as my husband pulls out the hose I slide the iron over the opening to seal the bag completely ! Job done ! I fold the bag as smooth as I can to make sure I have enough room to pack the top down in the bucket and the hubby pounds the lid down and it is stored away. I always try to seal the mylar bag as close to the open edge as I can so when I have to open the bucket and cut open te bag there is enough room to reseal the bag again. Since I won’t be able to use the entire bucket I take out plenty of wheat or corn and put it in some large glass or plastic storage jars to use out of daily or weekly. When that is used I reopen the bucket and do the same thing all over again until it is all used. Then the bucket is ready to be used again for more storage. I feel $11.00 for 50 lbs. of wheat sure does beat $8.25 for 88oz. or $46.95 for 40 lbs. from some of the food storage places. I get my wheat from a feed store. I place an order and they get it by a certai date and I go pay for it and pick it up. Look for ways to save yourself money so you can put the savings into something else for your storage. A little time and effort on your part can add up to big savings and make your food supply larger when it comes time to using it ! Also , if you have a dehydrator you can do your own veggies by buying frozen veggies and bring them home , put them on the trays still frozen and start the dehydrator, when they are dry and hard quickly place them in vacuum seal bags and seal. One trick I have learned over the years is to first place the dried veggies in a plastic food storage bag and trim off the top of the bag to just where the contents starts; place this bag inside the vacuum seal bag ad proceed to vacuum seal. By doing this you won’t get any small prick holes that will eventually let in air and destroy your seal. Dried veggies are hard and have sharp points that will leave a hole that sometimes can’t be seen. This proceedure fixes that problem. When I buy the plastic bags to use this way I go to the discount and dollar stores for the bags. I will buy the freezer bags because they are always heaver and the dollar stores are always cheaper. Hope you find these tips helpful !
      God Bless

      • Copperhead says:

        granny mae, when you order your wheat, what type of wheat do you get at the feed stores? I am interested in doing this, but am wondering how clean the wheat is. Some wheat is grown in my area and I know about all the weed seeds and ‘bugs’ that are combined with the wheat in the field. Thanks!

      • granny mae…having just scrolled down…and regarding your query above on vac sealing cans…can also just pour the wheat/rice/pasta/oats into the cans – no need for vac sealing – tap can gently on counter top so contents are as closely packed as possible…and then add an O2 absorber or two (depending on size) to the can before putting lid on…

        However, if cans are sitting or exposed to water for a long time…they will begin to rust – and will eventually rust on inside also…so, by using a foodsaver bag…solves this problem.

        The cans that I have used only O2 absorbers – these are stacked in old samsonite suitcases – from thrift store…to keep moisture from elements away from them in the interim period.

        Ordered my O2 absorbers from Salt Lake City LDS…as I’m on the other side of the pond, and they have free shipping.

        cheers.

  67. granny mae says:

    I just had to answer the question, what did you do to prep this week ? Since I’m up in age, I now make it a ongoing thing to prep or reprep nearly every day. If not for myself then for my kids. We have made this way of life our way of life for many years. I am now to the point where I simply check and recheck the foods and see where we need to restock, what we like and what we don’t like. I use up what we don’t much care for and then replace it with something we do care for. Nothing is ever wasted in this family. Have been working on alternative ways to get the water out of the well, incase of power shut down. As you can imagine we will be hunkering down in lace if TSHTF! Been through too many Hurricane evacuations to even consider that a smart thing to do at my age ! Although we do know how to do that without ever going on the main highways, like most idiots ! We live a good 20 miles from town and plan to make this the center for all the family to get to if need be. We are adding to our space for stored supplies and the men have all decided to check out some new guns but that isn’t unusual because these guys are avid hunters and have been for many years. We have our own home grown meat and I’m glad of that , since I have been reading up on the GMO’s and all the bad stuff in our food and seeds today. I can’t imagine the latest thing being done; placing human DNA in corn to make the corn able to be used as a way to control fertility in humans ! Dear Lord will it ever stop ? Anyway, we are careful of our seeds and what we feed our animals, and it is all for our way of life. I’m not going tobug out. Where would I bug out too? How would I take my animals and extensive food supply and everyother thing we use? No we will stay here and defend what we have till it can no longer be defended. However we have made extensive plans for doing just that so we are not vulnerable or easy pray. It is good to see so many people taking charge of their lives and making their own plans for their future. May I suggest one thing that you should add to your bob, and that is a bible. Never leave the Lord behind ! Lots of answers in that book. Keep your prepping up to date. Don’t think ,because you have enough food to carry you over for a long time that you can forget about it, because you can’t. You need to keep a check on it at least monthly, so if something changes in your food storage you will know about it long before you have to depend on it for your life only to find that something unforseen happened and it is lost. Mice can be one thing unforsseen, and tose little critters can do some damage. They will eat into plastic and mylar bags quickly. Been there and done that ! Also if you live in an area where roaches are a problem, they too can and do eat into mylar bags and can ruin your supply. So please keep an ongoing check all the time. I never stop storing food. Since I do a lot of home canning and dehydrating, I am always adding to my store. That is why we rotate. We have to, so we use our storage everyday. I use from that right along with using out of my freezer. I try to keep my freezer down as much as possible because if TSHTF and the electricity goes off for any length of time I can , can-up what is in the freezer so as not to loose it ! If that freezer was full all the time and the power went off, there would be too much for me to be able to take care of before it went bad. Can’t stand that thought ! I am always looking for new ways to prepare and store food and any other necessary items that the family needs to get by. So please don’t take for granted that you have your supplies all taken care of , because this ole granny will tell you from experience that, it ain’t necessarily so ! Besides how do you know when enough is enough! I’m alwas planning for the unexpected.
    God’s Blessings to you all.

    • Vienna (Soggy prepper) says:

      I knew I was forgetting something in my BOB. I will be adding a Bible.

    • granny mae…if you have room in your freezer now…fill it with 2-4 litre bottles of water…if/when power goes out..will give you extra time to can the meat/contents of freezer…and you also have cold clean water available.

    • When my daughter was younger, she used to say, “If you’re gonna be a member of THIS family, you gotta have a Bible and a flashlight!” We’ve laughed about that a lot, but believe me, it’s TRUE.

  68. Crazy week at home and work. I did manage to can more dry beans, potatoes and carrots. I dried potatoes, carrots and celery. Lightly pruned the new fruit trees…even though they are starting to bud. Cleaned up 6 beehives, prepping for the spring swarms (I catch my bees). I set up another 4 rain barrels: these are on the corners of the small barn (just need some rain). Made 100 gallons of compost tea (mushroom compost, worm castings, fish emulsion and chicken poop). And finally started gathering the supplies I need to put together a homemade aquaculture system…barrels, aquarium pumps/filters, planting medium (clay pellets) and pvc pipe for stands…just need the tilapia and a process to keep them at 75 to 80 degrees 24/7.

  69. longhuntre says:

    I played alot of Skyrim this week, my characte is a level 19 Nord who has joined the Dark Brotherhood. I also ordered more Marvel and DC tpb so i have plenty of reading material. I watched Captain America on Blue Ray

  70. cooolwoods says:

    Hi pack! scored a mossberg mavrick 88 with a modified choke! been wanting a shotgun for quite some time now, got this barely used one for a $100. ex son-in-law is hurting for $ so I know the gun, I doubt its been fired 20 times. grabbed an value box of 100 rounds from chinamart, just to have some rounds. another cal. to stock up on… but it makes me happy! shotguns scare people, you dont have to be a good shot to hit someone. picked up some of the 88 cent packs of otc meds there too.

    cleaned out the chicken coop
    lots of reading
    trying to come up with a decent entry for the contest
    the wife and I picked out a place to dig a shallow well, this spot has always been wet and soft even when we didnt have rain for weeks. so many springs around here I’d bet any hole dug there would fill up.
    also got the seeds out so we can start the tomatoes ect.
    and we scored enough old windows to make a small green house! just big enough to get a head start on the garden

    Stay safe
    so many things to do and not enough time or cash.

  71. In addition to what I posted above, I picked up two Ruger 10/22 magazines, first aid kit, and two pillows.

  72. Not much “doing” but lots of “thinking” (my preference). Did get some more food from Aldi, and first aid type products. Also did a good bit of reading on topic of homesteading.

  73. Ed Klingele says:

    What I did this week, I made a choice to become a prepper, and be more prepared for uncertain times. I live in central WA. I grew up in a hunting and fishing family, with three older brothers and a dad who taught us about the outdoors, we trapshooted together and hunted fished, shoot archery. I feel i have some good basic stills it takes to prep. Im 45 and live alone, and need advise on how to become more self reliant, I have a house on a acre plot, i garden and would like to raise chickens and learn how to benefit from solor and wind power. I have a well but if power goes down so does well. Can i back it up with a generator so i will always have water. How much water should I store for my self. I also have a camp trailor that i use for hunting, I would like to stock it and use for a last resort run to the hills, is this a smart idea? well i am inspired, thanks for any advice you can give me

    • Ed,

      Don’t use your last name on future posts. You don’t want to take a chance that someone in your area might pick up on what you have stored. Since you are new, check out M.D.’s post “10 things to do right now” and “another 10 things to do right now.” You might also Google “mormon food calculator” to see how much staples you might want to think about storing. Since you are an outdoorsman, you probably already have rifles and ammo.

      • MtWoman (N Central Texas) says:

        Agree with Gayle….don’t use your real name. You can use any name you want. And welcome….it sounds like you know where and how to start!

    • Copperhead says:

      Mr Klingele,
      Welcome to the world of prepping…good for you! If you will go to the top of M. D.’s blog, you will see on the left hand side “Survival Categories”. We have all had the same questions that you have and I believe that almost all of them are covered there in great depth. Have a big cup of coffee and start reading. They are all printable, too, so you can start saving them to hard copy for later reference. It is never too late to start.
      Blessings!

    • Ed, Congratulations on your decision. Your best bet to learn what you need to know is go back up to the top of this page and in the left hand column, look for a link for the Prepper List: Top 10 Things to Do Now and the Next 10 Things to Do. Read these lists and start working on them. M. D. has written books on this, there is a link at the top of the page for books and his are listed. Do a web search for “food storage” and the “LDS Preparedness Manual”. There is a huge amount of info out there and it will keep you busy for a while. There are many blogs out there but you have found a great spot for help here with very enthusiastic and wonderful people.

      P. S. Read up about OPSEC and then consider whether to use your real name or not. Most of us use an avatar that we hope helps keep our privacy.

    • Ed,
      If you get a generator, make sure it has enough power not only to run the well, but to start the pump as well, since the starting current can often be 3-5 times more than the operating current. Look at your pump motor for the initials LRA or Locked Rotor Amps as an indication of the amount of power required to start the pump. Multiply this number by the pump voltage (generally either 120 or 240) to give you the starting power requirement. You might eventually want a secondary way to pump water from the well, but initially I count on being able to pump 300-500 gallons of water per gallon of gasoline expended, meaning 100 gallons of gasoline will provide lots of water. You will probably want to have water independent of the generator, or pick up some storage containers like a water BOB, food grade barrels or even buckets. The buckets don’t have to be food grade it they’re being used for flush, clothing, or bathing water.

    • Ed K, first of all, welcome to the Wolf Pack.

      Look around this blogs topics just like Gayle suggested and many others. Review them and print them as resource, there are great topics sort of a do’s and don’t’s or prepping.

      Water is a valuable commodity, there are so many ways to store it. You can buy bottle by case (12 oz to 1L) bottle (5 gallon, water cans (5 to 10 gallons) and in approved water storage containers from 55 gallons to those containing 100 to 500 gallons. Start slow, don’t go broke over doing it.
      You can also collect rain water for your garden, cloth washing and drinking (if needed) since you live in an area that gets more rain than most.

      For power, I don’t know your $ situation but even if you buy a small generator to power your refrigerator and any power tools you may need its always a good bet. With that, the quieter the better, you don’t want to tell the world you have one when everyone is without power. They make quiet generators or if what you buy or can afford is a bit loud there are ways to reduce noise such as a car muffler attached. To creating a box to reduce sound or by digging a hole deeper than the size of the generator and place it in there with a tarp to allow the ground to absorb most of the sound.

      Do your research on solar energy, do you get enough sunlight in your area? Windmill, if you get enough wind coming through to convert it to energy or to be stored in a battery. Do your research.
      As a hunter you know maintaining a clean firearm is important as well as your stocking up on ammo and cleaning supplies. If you hunt by bow, have extra strings, arrows, replacement heads etc.

      A trailer is a great asset for bugging out. Do you know where you will go if you have to (don’t just run up in the mountains like Rambo or Jeremiah. Is the trailer completely closed and water tight or is it an open top covered by tarp? Storing it either way is great with prepared items IF its in a secure place like a garage so snooper’s don’t look in it. Have at leat 2 spare tires and make sure its maintained.

      Welcome aboard and if you have any questions we are here to help, again welcome to the Wolf Pack.

      • Be aware that the temperatures inside a trailer will reach a very high level (120-140 degrees) on a hot summer day in the South. Anything inside could be damaged or melted. I wouldn’t plan on putting any food in there unless you live pretty far north.

    • wow Ed…reading your post…yes, can see you are going to be very busy…and all the issues you touched on involve a steep learning curve…however…you have started…hooray…welcome on board…cheers.

    • For the well, check out FloJack and see if it will help in your situation.

  74. Got the last of the blacksmithing stuff in for my son. This week we got his forge & hand crank blower (boy are they hard to find). But its so neat – to think of someone using it 100 years ago is awesome. Also got him some coal and a hammer. Add those things to the other items he had and he’s ready to get going.

    Also this week we put up 15 buckets of food. Several months ago we’d bought a ton of stuff at the LDS store & we finally got around to putting it up.

    We are building a greenhouse for our farm/bug out property. The end pieces are done. Tomorrow we are taking it out there and putting it together. Total cost should be about $200 for an 8 X 12.

    We are also building a grape arbor for our farm. The wood is bought, just have to put it together. (hopefully tomorrow). In the early Spring, we’ll move out grape vines from our current house to the farm.

    Our Walmart has a HUGE bin of medications, bandaids, etc for 88 cents. Picked up about 15 things – most don’t expire until 2014.

  75. Spent alot of money for me this week, but it was all fun :o) Went to Sam’s early in the week and bought:
    50 lbs. of Rice
    50 lbs. of Pinto beans
    6 lbs. of Oats
    15 lbs. of Grits
    10 lbs. of Salt.
    Then stopped by Lowes and got 6 five gallon buckets w/ lids.
    Everything now is safe and sound in mylar bags and buckets
    Today I went to Wally World and stocked up on extra medical supplies canned meats and ammo.
    1100 rounds 22lr.
    100 rounds 9mm.
    75 rounds of 20 gauge.
    I don’t have the 20 gauge shotgun just yet but thought what the heck buying ammo for one might push me a little quicker into my direction of which one.
    I know this is a loaded question but if anyone has any favorites on 20 gauges I sure would like to know. Right now I’m leaning towards the “Mossberg 510 – mini”, being female I am looking to purchase a youth or adjustable stock.

    • Gail,

      Isn’t this only your second week posting? LOL You go girl!

      • Hahaha,
        Yeah Gayle it IS only my second week. I have been reading and researching so much my ears were overflowing with info and am feeling the need to go full steam.
        Oh and buy the way I haven’t given my Excalibur a break all week.

    • Gail,
      The Mossberg 500 or Remington 870 in youth model is an excellent choice. I’m not sure if the youth models can be purchased with the extended magazine, but if so, the extra shells at the ready could be worthwhile. You might also check into a side saddle shell holder and get it mounted on the gun to keep additional ammunition at the ready also.

      • Thanks OhioPrepper,
        I just got off the Mossberg site, was looking at the 500′s. The only thing detouring me from the 510 mini is that it only holds 3 rounds while others are 6 to 8. I suppose I could always go with the 500 and get an after market stock. Did that with some other guns I have and just hate to spend the money and see a brand new stock sitting in the corner collecting dust.

        • Gail,
          It depends on your intended use, but I myself would lean toward the higher capacity. You might also check if you can special order the gun or find a used one already the way you need it, keeping in mind the cost of course. Sometimes that extra stock (or box of holsters) sitting around is just the cost of getting equipment that has the form, git, and function you need.

        • cosmolined says:

          Gail: Charliebuck brought up a good point. The 3 round capacity may be due to a plug. This is something to make
          the weapon legal for bird hunting in many areas and is
          removable. I’d look at one in a gun store to see before I
          bought anything. Cos

          • cosmolined says:

            Arghhh! Time for new glasses. I read plug not slug…

          • Gail & cosmolined,
            Actually the Mossberg Model 510 Mini in 20 gauge has a 3 round magazine, meaning it can hold a total of 3+1 or 4 total capacity. It would still need to be plugged for 3 rounds (2+1) for most migratory bird hunting, and for Deer hunting here in Ohio. I would still consider the larger capacity magazine, even if you had to replace the stock, or potentially have the stock “cut down” by a competent gunsmith.

        • Digital_Angel_316 says:

          Check out the Mossberg 500 Bantam and Super Bantam Youth Shotguns in 20ga. as well (5 + 1 capacity – 3″). Also watch for sales offers at places such as Dick’s Sporting Goods and Walmart (and Cabela’s) – they often have specials and many times, Remington (not sure of Mossberg) offers a modest rebate (~$20 – $25). The Remington 870 Youth also has replaceable stocks (e-bay has them right now just as an alternative to check out). Both have a combo package for a slug barrel option. You will be pleased with either choice, get what suits you.

    • charliebuck69 says:

      Gail,I had a Mossberg 20 gauge years ago when I was a teen.Not sure if it was a 500 or maybe 600?Been too long,sold it during lean times.It had a field barrel for small game,birds,etc,and also a rifled slug barrel that I used for Pennsylvania deer,and later on,Arizona javelina.Great gun,not too much recoil either.You might really like the 20 gauge.Just a thought.Stay safe.

  76. MtWoman (N Central Texas) says:

    Question for the Pack: does Coleman fuel “go bad”? I have a gallon can that’s been down in the hangar for a year, through cold & hot temps. There’s a little bit of rust showing on the top, and along the side seam.

    Is any of this a concern?

    • MtWoman,
      I think it does have a shelf life of sorts, like gasoline, but the key is in how you will be using it. Since it’s going to be vaporized and used to run a camp stove or lantern, I think worst case it will not be quite as efficient, meaning the light may not be quite as bright or you may have to turn up the burner on the stove a bit more to cook your food.

    • Hi MtWoman-
      Probably fine. We keep some at our camphouse, and there is some in the back of the shelf that might just be a couple of decades old (of more)… the stove doesn’t seem to mind which canister it comes from – it always seems to work.
      Try it and find out!
      Cat

    • MtWoman,
      If the can hasn’t been opened, it will last a long while. I have used 10 year old fuel in lanterns with no problems.
      If the can was opened or the can has rusted through exposing the fuel to oxygen, I would guess about 3 years. Might still be good after that but I’d only use it in items with generators that are easily cleaned as you will probably get increased gum build up.

  77. I came up with a new dinner recipe tonight and it can be made with shelf stable foods.

    A while back I canned a bunch of chicken chunks. So I have been playing around with recipes. Here’s a good one.

    BBQ Chicken Sammy (feeds 2 people)

    1 pint canned chicken
    1 onion (or reconstituted onion)
    BBQ sauce

    Cook onion in butter or oil. Add chicken. Warm. Add bbq sauce. Serve on rolls. Approximate cook time: less than 10 minutes.

    I made this for dinner tonight and my dh really liked it. He was surprised it came from the canned chicken. (The first recipe we tried using the canned chicken wasn’t very good.)

    I served it with the dehydrated hashbrowns that I got from Sam’s Club. I put some onion in the hashbrowns, and added a bit of cajun seasoning and some season pepper.

    Next I am going to use the canned chicken to make chicken tacos.

    • Sounds good to me. LOL

    • Vienna (Soggy prepper) says:

      That canned chicken mixed with a couple “cream of” soups with a dash of worcestershire and a smidge of cream cheese (only if you feel naughty). Heat it up and pour it over rice. We store Jasmine rice because I like the way it smells. lol
      If you season and kinda brown the chicken first and then add the soups, that’s the best. Small DD favorite dinner.

      I’m going to try the BBQ chicken sammy next. Although I’ll probably use homemade bread.

      The dehydrated hash browns or potato rounds are good with the powdered cheese also. Cheesy tatoes.

    • Gayle..that is a good recipe for me to try when I am camping next…thanks…

  78. Congrats M.D. on the numbers and the success of your blog! And I’d also like to congratulate all the folks who post here, I’ve noted a real change over the past few months. Discussions have been civil and to the point, even those concerning politics and religion, without the name calling and personal attacks that seemed to be so prevalent in the past. And real, useful information has been shared rather than personal diatribes blaming one group or another for all the woes being experienced.
    I know some of this is due to M.D.’s influence alone, but it seems this blog has crested a hill that so many other blogs never even begin to climb – seeing that helping one another in a positive way can advance us all where as blame and negativity helps no one.
    Now the few of you here who know me can attest that I’m not the “sing kumbaya around the campfire” type, but what I’ve seen and experienced from all of you has made me proud to be accepted around this virtual setting.
    Thank you.

  79. I don’t know how many of you sprout seeds, but I just came across some really good information that I thought was important enough to share with my Wolf Pack family. Chia seeds, yes, that’s right, the ones from the world famous Chia pets, are one of the most nutritional foods you can eat. (Don’t eat the ones that come with the Chia pet though, get organic from health food store or I got mine on amazon. The Aztec’s lived on them. My sister is on a special diabetes/heart diet and is on a blog where she learned this….soak Chia seeds in water for 30 minutes. It gels up kind of like tapioca, same consistency. Add a splash of milk, a sprinkle of sugar or stevia and a drop of vanilla and it’s just like tapioca. I tried it last night and, man, it was good! The seeds are tiny, lightweight, would be great to stick in your BOB and keep a big supply at home. There’s really no taste to them at all. Here’s some helpful info:

    Adding just 2 tablespoons of chia seeds to your daily
    diet will give you approximately 7 grams of fiber,
    4 grams of protein, 205 milligrams of calcium, and
    a whopping 5 grams of omega-3! That’s
    More Omega-3 than Atlantic Salmon
    More Antioxidants than fresh blueberries
    More Fiber than bran flakes
    More Calcium than 2% milk
    More Protein, Fiber & Calcium than flax seed

    1.Chia Seeds Are Nutritious
    On top of the fact that chia seeds have more omega-3 than any
    other natural source, they are loaded with antioxidants, calcium,
    protein, fiber, and many other vitamins & minerals.

    2.Chia Seeds Are Energizing
    Not only do chia seeds give you a boost of energy that lasts,
    they also provide stamina and endurance. A single tablespoon
    could sustain Aztec warriors for an entire day.

    3.Chia Seeds Reduce Cravings
    Because chia seeds absorb so much water and have high soluble
    fiber levels, they help release natural, unrefined carbohydrate
    energy slowly into the bloodstream.

    4.Chia Seeds Are Easily Digestible
    Unlike flax seed, chia seeds do not have to be ground up before
    you ingest them. The human body can easily digest chia seeds,
    and with about 7 grams of fiber per serving, they actually help.

    5.Chia Seeds Are Convenient & Versatile
    You can eat chia seeds straight from the bag, mix them with your
    favorite drink, add them to your cereal or salad, and just about
    anything else. Chia seeds last for years so stock up now!

    • Let’s get a chia pet shaped like Obama’s head and give it away as a prize in the next writing contest.

    • yes…totally agree – I purchased 3 kgs of chia seeds (from USA) just a few weeks ago…

      I already have my car loaded for tomorrow’s trip, and included are several plastic screw top jars of
      chia seeds,
      slivered almonds,
      spiralina caps,
      sesame seeds, and last but not least,
      sunflower kernals…

      cheers.

    • I’ve been wanting to get chia seeds for a while. Do you know which brands sprout and which ones don’t? I want to nibble on my pet.

      • Kelekona,
        I believe all of them will sprout, but I would steer towards organic. They are available on Amazon.com if you don’t have a health food store in your area. I purchased six pounds for about 38.00 with free shipping. For the nutrition they provide, IMHO it’s well worth it.

        • Conmaze–A year ago I bought chias 6 lbs./$28. I repackaged them into 1 lb. food saver bags and I generally use them in a fruit drink a few times a week. I bought them from Raw Food World and they are very clean-no chaff-but haven’t tried sprouting them. I’m also taking aloe vera gel in fruit drinks. Takes a little getting used to but I read the benefits are great. The gel has to be refrigerated however.

  80. Copperhead says:

    Hi, Wolf Pack!
    First, congratulations, M. D., on such a wonderful, successful site! It’s wonderful to have that many readers! Also, my hat is off to you to read everything we all comment on and you have to moderate…I don’t know how you do it and get anything else done!!! It takes me hours/days to read everything!

    My accomplishments in prepping is for the last two weeks. I have had a horrible sinus infection that has wiped me out. Spent time in my recliner and had too bad a headache to even read. :( It’s stubbornly hanging on still, so please ‘scuse any typos etc. A major prep has been to get my tractor serviced and repaired from the !@@$%^ rats that chewed through two hoses! Had to be hauled in to the shop-couldn’t be fixed in my barn. “Have to put it on the computer, don’tcha know!?” So even the tractor is computerized! It’s in a metal barn, will that protect it from EMP? I also finished my tax preparation…they have to be in to Unca Sam by March 1st for us farmers. What a job. Did an inventory of my canned goods and darn if I didn’t have a couple of cans super outdated. Grrrr. I did pitch them and made myself promise to be more diligent.

    This year may be just as hot and dry as last year in my area and I have been fussing and fretting about what to do about a garden. I came across a blog that was telling about ‘planting in a bag’ garden and I got really excited about it. Am going to try it this year. It will be better soil than my hard old dirt and I can water it much more efficiently and easily. It will make my raised beds even a bit higher for this old lady and her arthritis to deal with. When I had my knee operations, the bermuda grass had taken over the beds and now I can combat that without hiring someone to dig it all out for me. I can’t wait! I also got word that my Flojak pump is on it’s way, so should arrive tomorrow or Tuesday.

    My prayers for all our sick ones or ones having surgery. I pray for our group every night that we will all be safe.
    Blessings to all.

    • My parents grew their tomatoes in bales of hay one year. The plants did great.

    • copperhead i hope you will be feeling better soon. a sinus infection and really throw one for a loop.

      • Copperhead says:

        Thanks, Pam S, I’m getting there. I’ve not had one of these in a long time and hope it’s even longer before I get another one.

        • If the sinus infection keeps hanging on, please see an ENT if you can. Regular docs can handle most sinus infections but one that becomes chronic need a specialist to deal with them. Take it from someone who suffered with them for 25 plus years. A specialist found a physical reason for mine and out patient surgery took care of it and not one sinus infection in the last three years. Just IMO.

  81. Not a ton of purchases this week. We are clearing out and setting up our back room to get all of the seed starting going mid-march. Discovering numerous items we had forgotten we had, but I suspect that is typical.

    Started working on the beehives (repairing and installing new wax foundations) and talked to the local apiary about ordering bee packages. We will be ordering them tomorrow with delivery in late April, which will give us time to get all of the gear repaired and ready to go.

    Took another inventory of the long term food and we still need more sugars and oils, but otherwise in pretty good shape.

    The one item I did actually order (with an Amazon gift card from Christmas via MD’s link) was an encrypted thumb drive: Corsair Padlock Secure 8 GB USB 2.0 Flash Drive CMFPLA8GB (http://www.amazon.com/dp/B003809LBS/ref=asc_df_B003809LBS1905506?smid=ATVPDKIKX0DER&tag=hyprod-20&linkCode=asn&creative=395093&creativeASIN=B003809LBS)

    Managing to check off a few items from the list, and add a few more, meaning that this prepping will never be completely done, LOL.

  82. ozhillbilly says:

    Hi to all of the Wolf Pack gang! I would like to echo the thanks many of you have posted to M.D. for all of his efforts and hard work keeping this site up and going. It’s a great resource and very appreciated.

    This past week my prepping has been limited to assessing and evaluating future wants and needs. One thing I’ve been focusing on is putting out feelers to folks, friends and family in hopes of organizing a network of people that will have each other’s back when the stuff hits the fan. Having said that, I realize when doing this one must use the utmost caution as not to attract undesirables and expose your backside. I also realize these people should be like-minded and be responsible for their own preparedness. It’s difficult and expensive enough to prepare for your own family; you don’t need the added responsibility of others. In an urban situation like mine it’s likely going to happen anyway. I welcome your comments on this thinking.

    I received an email from a friend this week warning how the CIA and other intelligence gathering agencies are using the internet, Facebook, etc. to spy on folks. I have always been cautious in my use of the internet; especially Facebook, but I deleted my Facebook account anyway. To my prepping friends out there in cyberland please use caution in what you say and do on the internet. Remember Big Brother is watching! Just a little food for thought.

    The last of the books I ordered have arrived. As I have stated before, I’m a book-aholic and can’t go very long without adding to my library. It’s one of my many faults. I bought more garden seed last week. More than I will plant this year. With proper care in their storage they will remain viable for a few years or more. For the fun of it I purchased one silver Washington quarter at a local coin shop. I asked for “junk silver” but he returned with a very nice 1958 which I conservatively grade at MS-63. It cost me $6.70. That’s 26.8 times face value. To me that’s a little pricey. My 2010 Red Book has this coin valued at $8.00 so I guess if you take that into consideration I did ok.

    Thanks to all for your ear and Good Luck prepping!

    • village idiot says:

      ozhillbilly, I don’t say anything to anyone about being prepared. I might try to get people to see gardening and canning as a way to save money, something along those lines, but I never mention preppi