What I Did to Prep This Week

What I Did To Prep This Week – Week 10 – Aug 26th – Sept 1st 2018

prep week 10

Harvesting and preserving time may be over, but there is still plenty of hot, sweaty, and dirty work going on here on our survival homesteading retreat. Our preps this week were primarily focused on moving downed trees that had been drying, chopping them up, and then splitting them to make firewood.

Bobby and I had several “date nights” out enjoying our trails and marking where the previously cut down trees were located and harvesting more wild medicinal plants.



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This is my spunky beast Jovie running along with us while cutting a new trail in our woods while on the hunt for cut trees and medicinal “weeds”:

Jovie the dog

This is my beloved’s dog, Ruger. He and Jovie were litter mates. She is a tough country dog that runs several miles a day through the woods and patrols the barn during turnout:

Ruger the dog

Ruger, on the other hand, sits in the air conditioning at Bobby’s office and takes truck rides when he goes out on appointments. I call him the “town dog.” While Jovie chased scents and ran the ahead of us to guard us, Ruger hopped in the back of the Ranger and sat on a blanket. Jovie is by far the better dog…no matter what my dear husband thinks.

We have a whole section in our upper pasture where the honeysuckle is blooming vibrantly again. This thrilled me to no end. Not only do I love the smell of honeysuckle, I am now able to dehydrate more flowers and leaves to add to my SHTF apothecary stash.

Honeysuckle has successfully used to treat a myriad of mundane to serious medical issues:

• Headaches and migraines
• The flu
• The common cold
• Arthritis and joint pain, and inflammation
• Digestive problems such as ulcers, nausea, and general stomach aches and pains
• Detoxification from various toxins
• Insect bites, skin rashes, and boils.
• To boost the immune system
• To reduce fever
• Congestion relief
• Urinary conditions
• As a natural treatment for diabetes
• To lower cholesterol

In addition to firewood duty (including spending time fixing the wood splitter that came with the property when it broke), we had a visit from the farrier. This was the first time we had this Amish farrier come – and it will be the last. He came highly recommended but was far too rough with our animals to me…even by Amish standards.

Amish farrier

His prices were a little cheaper than the last farrier, and he fit the shoes perfectly, but I simply cannot have the trust my animals have placed in me destroyed by allowing anyone to hit them.

There is a difference between using force to curtail an animal to prevent it from doing harm to itself or to tend to its hooves and hitting or punching it. I have never had to resort to levying pain to get a horse to do exactly what I wanted or needed it to do. The folks who recommended the farrier treat their horses well, but being men, they may have a different outlook on what it takes to control a 1,000-pound animal.

Having a farrier that will come to you is both a big time and money saver – especially when you have a 2-horse trailer and five horses that need hauled 15 miles each way to a non-traveling farrier. But, learning how to complete the task properly yourself is, as in all things, a much better idea.

So, my plans to learn how to trim and shoe myself are being fast-tracked. A horse’s health depends on its feet, and when the SHTF horses will once again become a primary (if not only) mode of transportation, means to haul anything heavy, and be used for agricultural purposes.

Dan is going to publish my how to trim and shoe horses and medium livestock article (complete with detailed videos) on Survival Sullivan in the near feature. Hope you venture over there to check it out.

The only other prepping this week involved some homeschooling activities with our youngest grandchildren and regaining control over my craft table. I spent a lot of time at my table using natural materials from our survival homesteading retreat to make both birthday and Christmas gifts for loved ones and homeschooling learning aids.

Before we decreased our home square footage and vastly enlarged our land, I had an entire room for my craft projects. Now I use a section of our living room to create various types of projects. I have several drawers full of morale-boosting items that children and older members of our tribe can busy themselves with during a long-term disaster.

Morale boosters are often at least a slightly overlooked part of prepping plans. Of course they are not as important as food, water, or medicine preps, but they still possess value. All of my bargain books from the annual library sale will also come in quite handy when members of our tribe get a moment to unwind during and after a SHTF scenario. Keeping some semblance of “normal” can help reduce stress and anxiety, especially with children, in a survival situation.

This week’s questions:

1. What type of morale boosters have you stockpiled?
2. What is your favorite home remedy recipe?
3. Will you be able to care for the needs of your livestock by yourself during a disaster situation?

How did you prep this week? Share your self-reliance successes and failures of the week with The Survivalist Blog online community in the comments section below.



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Tara Dodrill

About Tara Dodrill

Tara Dodrill is a homesteading and survival journalist and author. She lives on a small ranch with her family in Appalachia. She has been both a host and frequent guest on preparedness radio shows. In addition to the publication of her first book, 'Power Grid Down: How to Prepare, Survive, and Thrive after the Lights go Out', Dodrill also travels to offer prepping tips and hands-on training and survival camps and expos.
View all posts by Tara Dodrill →

131 thoughts on “What I Did To Prep This Week – Week 10 – Aug 26th – Sept 1st 2018

    1. Puppy was a bad boy. The Mrs. Is in the hospital and he got one of her dress shoes and chewed up the heel.
      He did some face time on my phone with her and kept running away from the phone. LOL

      Picked some tomatoes, peppers and pears.

      Bought water
      Bought 100lbs of dog food

      Cut another half cord of firewood. Heard its going to be a cold winter.

      Heard..Russian news paper is saying to prepare for direct military conflict with US.

      Prepare, prepare,prepare………

      1. 1. What type of morale boosters have you stockpiled?
        2. What is your favorite home remedy recipe?
        3. Will you be able to care for the needs of your livestock by yourself during a disaster situation?

        1 Vodka, gin ect……potatoes chips and peanuts.

        2 Garlic, honey, oregano, basil, cayenne and cinnamon.

        3 I will not eat my puppy…..LOL

          1. AT, 2 cloves of fresh garlic cut in medium pieces, tablespoon of fresh honey, sprinkle each of the other ingredients in filtered water, cold not hot. Stir and chew garlic. There is a chemical released from raw garlic but its only there for 15 minutes and doesn’t work if hot. This really helps your immune system fight off colds and flu or at least makes symptoms less severe.

        1. LTD, nope still waiting on test results. They let her come back home from last time but needed to go back Dr.’s orders. Could be liver cancer…..I hope and pray not. I don’t want to lose my baby. Puppy keeps looking for her and misses her immensely. I have done face time with her for him and he looks like how did you get Mommy in that box.

          1. More prayers for your wife. Puppy misses her too, obviously.

            We’ve been baby-sitting the grand-dog for a few days. He whined all night the first night and whines every time we leave, then we can hear him whining when we pull in the garage. He goes back home with his mama today. I just pray her children (eventual) are not that way too.

          2. Ga Red, thank you, I’m so worried, I told Puppy she might come home tomorrow and he ran to the front door looking. He’s so smart. They are giving her morphine for pain…… So I am severely worried.

  1. Went looking at Class C RV’s. Found something we liked, both in size and amenities. We currently have a 24’ travel trailer with a ton of storage space that works for us when we go grid-less camping (we plan to keep this). We are looking for something to long-weekend junkets and road trips. One of the major dealers in the state gets these 22’ RV’s from a company that markets to Europeans for a 5-month RV vacation in the US. They fly into NY and out in CA. Then they sell these vehicles. 14-16,000 miles, 6 months old, 2/3’s to ½ the price of new.

    Stopped in a small (10-15 buildings) town that I have driven past for 25 years. They have a “dinner club” there that requires reservations. Well, during the day they have a deli, coffee bar, and bulk food store! Bulk items in small quantities that are usually only available on-line. Amish run, interesting place.

    Got given more free apples. The guy that gave me the 1st batch has been so busy that the apples are going to go bad before they can do anything with them. Since I was pretty much paying attention to what the DW was doing to make apple butter, I can jump in and get some of it done for her.

    Nice surprise this week, got our retirement pay 5 days early (Monday vs. Friday)!

    Stuff: ½ pint canning jars (2 doz.), milk crate, marker pens (3),

    A 5 section roll of 5.5” x 50’ x 3/16” bubble wrap for free, it was just literally rolling down the street; no shipping label or anything on the outside; guess I’m good for a while with liner for EMP cans.

    Questions:

    #!. Morale boosters: Hard candy and M&M’s. Breakfast hot cereals (my comfort food). Plus we keep a stock of board and card games.

    #2. Home remedy: The only one we make and use is Elderberry Tincture. We use Bam Bam’s receipe, although 100 proof vodka is hard for us to come by (for whatever reason).

    #3. Yep, easy….no livestock.

    1. I did forget to mention our “library”. We currently have 8 bookcases that are filled to overflowing, plus another 8-10 boxes of books in the basement. This does not included my 6000+ kindle books that I’ve downloaded over the years onto 8 different tablets. Most of these are by subject with 2 set up for general reading, plus the laptop. I keep them in insulated cans, sealed up except when being updated. I have plenty of solar and backup chargers and extra batteries for those I can.

    2. JP I would love to get the name of the rv dealer in Montana. A week ago my housing situation looked shaky to say the least but is looking better. I don’t want to be caught too unprepared so am looking at options. You can get my email from Ohio prepped if you want to send it to me privately.

      1. JP,

        JP I would love to get the name of the rv dealer in Montana. A week ago my housing situation looked shaky to say the least but is looking better. I don’t want to be caught too unprepared so am looking at options. You can get my email from Ohio prepped if you want to send it to me privately

        I can connect you with suzy q and keep OPSEC if you would like. Just click on my name (The Ohio Prepper) and the link will take you to a website where you can send me an email. Just mention the name you use here and the fact you want connected to suzy q and I’ll make the connection.

      2. suzy q:

        Bretz RV. They are in Billings and Missoula, MT. I went to Missoula, just ’cause. I assume they both have some and can move inventory back and forth (it is over 400 miles between them though). They had 2 at the time I was there (Leprechaun 22′). They costs were $57,000+ and $58,000+. Since I was just trying to get an idea of the market, I didn’t write any prices down.

    3. JPinMT
      If you & Ohio Prepper do not mind I would like to also have that information. Will take if off line IF Ohio Prepper an you are alright with that request.

      Dh has health issues and the only way we will be able to travel now is with an RV which is a home away from home. Would love to have a travel trailer but can not back it up worth a darn. You both would crack up laughing watching me back up the small trailer we used to haul hay here for the place. Some days I could do it, but most days it was,,, ok, your turn to dh. 😊

      1. Antique Collector:

        There are RV’s made for handicap access. I have a friend with MS. Now his was a trailer, but the doors were wider, etc. I do not know the brand or where he got it, but Bretz RV is the largest dealer in MT, and we sure get a lot of people who have bought here and then taken it to their home state, as we have no sales tax.

        Tuesday I can post a phone number.

        1. JPinMT
          Thank you.
          Due to all the smoke it has made his COPD worse, so he had to start with his oxygen during the day which he never had to do before. He now has a nebulizer to help open his lungs to breathe easier. We need a way to take the house with us so we can travel an take all his supplies. CABIN FEVER….

          1. Antique Collector:

            In addition to the RV, we plan on boutting a trailering attachment to our van. 2nd vehicle plus a trailer!

          2. JPinMT

            Found one that would fit our bill, the price tag new runs around $60,000. Would require a few changes for support equipment, but it is the first one that I found would expand yet still give us room for making traveling comfortable. Now if only he can handle my long distance driving…lol

            Hope you & Mrs. JP enjoy what ever unit you decided to purchase.

          3. AC:

            We took a road trip this weekend and it just reinforced our desire for an RV. The trip would actually been cheaper with our own food and lodging, factoring the extra gas.

  2. Greetings, all!

    DH and I slowed it down a bit this week. We’re pretty tired, after 10 years of “hitting it hard”! And we’re now 10 years older! Time to stop and smell the roses. If only they hadn’t all died out for the fall!

    Canned more tomatoes and tomato juice.
    Made another batch of Concord Grape Jelly and canned. Probably last batch for this year. Concord Grape vines are dying back. I will have to treat them this Fall for a soil-borne virus that affected them.
    Bronze Scuppernong grapes are about to finish ripening; I’ll be working with those soon.
    Harvested more wild persimmons and made pulp for freezer.
    Gathered wild elderberry and prepping for more syrup.
    Garden still producing some veggies & fruits. Enjoyed home-grown cantaloupe today, organically grown.
    Took care of bees, chickens, dogs, cats, people, as always.
    Spent more time wrapping up details of estate planning; we have formed a Family Trust for estate purposes and have dropped all assets into it. Took care of advanced health care directives, etc., as well. So, got all that in order – just in case.
    Saved seeds.
    Started reorganizing storage room, much overdue, and this is going to take a while.
    Hit a few yard sales; met a lady at one who has chickens, but had no idea why she had them. Kid you not! Actually, her husband “had” them. But they don’t eat the chickens. And they don’t eat the eggs. They just let them range, and they don’t pay much attention, even though they have a tractor. She talked about predators getting them (duh!). She thought eggs from the grocery store were “cleaner” than these eggs. I explained to her why they are not, how chickens are kept commercially, what she needed to do to take care of her chickens and start eating the eggs. She seemed interested in what I “taught” her. We’ll see if they actually do it. It’s just amazing to me that anyone would “keep” chickens, but do nothing with them except let predators eat them!

    1. LivintheDream,
      Our plan yet this year is also to revisit our will and establish a family trust. For some reason we’ve just kept putting it off.
      We have both a goat and a miniature horse that are essentially DW’s pets; but, the chickens would not be here should there not be eggs involved. Keeping chickens as pets and predator food sounds like an odd thing to do; but, I suspect these are city folk you’re mentioning.

  3. 1. What type of morale boosters have you stockpiled?

    Like JP, hard candies, board games, cards & card game books, craft supplies, “DIY” build stuff books. We have an extensive library – I long ago lost count! We also stock books for children of all ages, not just adults.

    We have an extensive library of VCR tapes and DVDS, as well. Yes, they require power to enjoy. There are off-grid ways to supply that power, as we all know.

    2. What is your favorite home remedy recipe?

    Elderberry syrup. We use a lot of it in winter. Gathered elderberries this week and making another batch. I simply sort the berries, wash them, cook them with a little lemon juice (about 1/4 cup to a quart of liquid, which is 2 pints) to boost acidic levels, and add local, raw honey to sweeten. I just sweeten and sample until I like the taste. Then I water bath process, the
    minutes depending on the size jar I use – mostly pints, 25 minutes from the time the boil begins.

    I’m also big on garlic. Now is the time to plant your garlic bulbs for next year’s harvest. Buy organic garlic in the grocery, break it into “bulbs”, and plant with bottoms down (of course!).

    3. Will you be able to care for the needs of your livestock by yourself during a disaster situation?

    Yes. I currently buy non-gmo, organic feed for my chickens. I do not free range due to abundance of hawks. But in a post-IHTF, I’d free range for food for them, and do the best possible to keep hawks off – though they’re going to be hungry, too.

    The only other “livestock” I have are bees. They’re good to go.

    Cats: I store cat food. They’re really good at taking down squirrels, rats and mice. Excellent hunters, so, they won’t starve.

    Dogs: they’re old and we make their dog food, for the most part. Although we do keep dry food around and in their bowls 24/7. They treat it more like “puppy popcorn”. So, long-term, it could get tough. But I have stores for them, too.

    1. LivintheDream,

      I’m also big on garlic. Now is the time to plant your garlic bulbs for next year’s harvest. Buy organic garlic in the grocery, break it into “bulbs”, and plant with bottoms down (of course!).

      Are you planting the bulbs or the cloves? We plant the individual cloves and have another month or so to get it done. Here we plant on October 10th and harvest the following year on the 4th of July.
      We have three varieties harvested in previous years we’ll be planting soon.
      BTW, in our case Garlic and Onions are nearly the only “spice” we need.

        1. Livinthedream,

          I plant cloves,OP.

          Good, that’s what I thought; but, above you stated:

          I’m also big on garlic. Now is the time to plant your garlic bulbs for next year’s harvest. Buy organic garlic in the grocery, break it into “bulbs”, and plant with bottoms down (of course!).

          I just wanted to make sure I wasn’t going to a lot of trouble with the cloves if there was a different or better way. A friend plants garlic all of the time; but, this is my first attempt and I wanted to make sure I wasn’t missing something.

  4. Oh, and we save EVERYTHING, so we have something to build WITH. Those DIY books are useless if you have no materials to work with!

    1. How right you are! We have been concentrating upon doing exactly that. Hardware, steel with which to fabricate more hardware, an overhead rack full of lumber. Electrical wire, tarps, solvents – the list is endless and then we remember something else!

  5. Tara and OP, I’ve asked one of my Prepared Seniors & Friends (Linda) to contact you here. She’s in Ohio. Needs a “local support team”. Hope you hear from her.

    1. LivintheDream,
      If that is the group on mewe,com, I have an account & I’m trying to navigate my way to that group.
      GrammyPrepper also lives in Ohio and the DW & I just met her and her DH for lunch this past week.

  6. Did my usual shopping and added to my grocery stash.

    My back has been killing me lately, so I went to the chiropractor for the first time in my life. My L-5 vertebrae is all out of whack (even I could see that on the x-ray) and my other lumbar vertebrae are spread a bit too far apart. No wonder my back hurts. He wants me to see him three times a week. My insurance will cover the adjustments, but not the x-rays. Had two adjustments so far and there was a noticeable difference after the second until I twisted wrong putting granddaughter into her car seat. Back to Ground Zero.

    Got my new hearing aids. They’re pretty cool, hooked up to my iPhone and all with Bluetooth. I’m still trying to adjust them as my hearing is still whacky from going to the range last week. The audiologist did another hearing test and there is a noticeable drop off from the test done two weeks prior. I have noticed some improvement, but she wants me back in two more weeks if I haven’t noticed a significant improvement.

    I decided to sell my HK-91 rifle and accessories. When they aren’t fun anymore, they’ve got to go. I’ve had a couple of nibbles, but nothing serious so far.

    Granddaughter is back from vacay and did she ever have a great time at Disney World. She’s still excited about meeting all the various characters and her favorite rides (boats!). I have a photo her mom took on the It’s a Small, Small World ride. The look of wonder on her face is priceless. I wish I could post it.
    Had to spend some time helping my #2 daughter with an issue involving her sub-tenant. He’s turned into a real jerk since he got arrested and pled guilty to embezzlement a couple of months ago. He’s on probation and they want him out of the house because they don’t like probation officers dropping by unannounced and since he’s not working, he isn’t paying his share of the rent. Long story, but he’s getting threatening now. They (#2 and her boyfriend) have to wait until Tuesday to go to the court clerk’s office to file protective orders and start eviction. I guess the dummy wants his probation pulled and be sent to prison.

    Prison: The socialist’s wonderland. Everything is free.

    Tara’s Questions:
    1. Morale boosters: Books. Lots and lots of books. Playing cards and sniping at looters (just kidding unless they’re trying to loot me).
    2. Home remedy: Primarily elderberry syrup and tincture (Bam Bam’s recipe). Some essential oils.
    3. Livestock care: Nope. The local squirrels will have to fend for themselves until I start sniping them for food (not kidding).

    1. Zulu 3-6,
      The Dw & I have used a chiropractor on and off for decades; but, since I’ve lost a ton of weight (80 lbs total over the years.) and do my exercises, I haven’t needed to see him for quite a while.
      For your morale booster I expected to see “playing with a little girl” on the list, since it’s clear she brings joy to your life.

      1. TOP,

        You are absolutely correct. Being with my granddaughter indeed brings me great joy and raises my morale.

        In fact, she was over at my place today with her mom for a little while. A total bundle of energy, and funny. Quite a sense of humor for a 22-month old. 🙂

        I do need to lose weight. In fact, the chiropractor suggested the very thing as being quite helpful on several levels.

        1. Zulu 3-6 – the hubby has lost over 100 pounds and his back issues are WAY better – he actually feels like doing stuff around the yard now.

          1. G A Red,

            100lbs would be too much for me, 70lbs would be nice.

            Sometimes I look at myself in the mirror and when on the scale and I wonder what in hell happened to that 165lb Marine?

          2. Zulu 3-6,

            100lbs would be too much for me, 70lbs would be nice.

            I’m down about 80 lbs from my high of 235 back in 2006 and it makes a ton of difference.

            Sometimes I look at myself in the mirror and when on the scale and I wonder what in hell happened to that 165lb Marine?

            While I was never a marine, I ran 5 miles every day after work and more on the weekened, plus lots of tennis, rock climbing, spelunking, and SCUBA diving. What happened to me was I got married. Don’t get me wrong, we just passed the 36 year mark and I’m quite happy; but, having someone else who prepared food every evening and expected you to sit with the family and eat, along with family time that required little exertion really piled on the pounds.
            We’ve been empty nesters since 2009 and my health issues demand I keep off the weight and keep up the exercise.
            So far, so good.

          3. Zulu 3-6 and OP – the hubby was over 300lbs. He still has at least 20 pounds to go which would put him around 190. I’m not sure he’d look right weighing that little. It’s hard enough for me to come to terms with the fact that he weighs less than he did when we got married – it’s hard to believe.

          4. G A Red,

            I was about 175 when I got married, but I was lifting more weights than I did in the Marines. I wasn’t overweight, just more muscular. Down the road, when I retired from the military and police work, the arthritis started up and the weight piled on.

            One thing that did happen was I quit smoking just before I got out of the Marines. Weight control was a struggle ever after. That and eating Cuban food all the time.

          5. GA Red & Zulu 3-6,
            The thing no one is mentioning here is height. At 5’ 6: I’m kind of short so the weight hangs differently than on tall people. Come to think of it, I’ve actually never been overweight, just under tall, LOL.

          6. Zulu 3-6,
            I’ve also only smoked cigarettes once at about age 13-14. The “cool” kids gave me a cigarette and lit me up and after the first long draw I saw no big deal in the practice. As I was taking the second draw, the world started spinning and I lost my breakfast. Those same cool kids said I would “get used to it”; but, I saw no need and that was my first and last attempt. Looking back I’m glad I had the experience and was the bull headed guy who didn’t generally bow to peer pressure, even back then.

  7. Celebrating my Birthday weekend I was my mother’s labor day gift. Moved my 2 cherry tomatoes, in my greenhouse the weather is starting to change no rain just clouds and cooler in the upper 60’s just last week we were in the mid 80’s. We started our first three days of school, the kids are really liking their classes and teachers, which is a big plus. Reorganized the pantry, I have made a list of what I need to restock up on will get to that next week because of the Labor day weekend, I don’t want to be in the stores. Yesterday I chopped all my old raspberry canes, out and cleaned out the leaves and pulled out the old chopped canes, that I did not pull out last year. Mowed the lawn and getting all my herbs chopped back. I’ll be getting the outside of the house ready for Winter getting the foam blocks put in getting all the patio cushions put away. Still working on the inside of the house I have two more bags of clothes, and some knick knacks, I don’t want anymore that I’ll be donating out I want to slim down our house. Went thrift shopping yesterday I got three small Yankee Candles, for $1.99 each they are usually $11.00 a piece, we also bought 2 large piller candles, in a soft oarnge for $3.99 for our Autumn decor.. I also scored a dozen taper candles for .25 a piece from another thrift shop they are from Michaels craft store. I just love my candles, and the great prices make it nice to burn and enjoy them. I got a great deal on small canning lids from Ace 1.99 each so I got 5 more to get my stock back up again.

    Questions 1 Moral booster My Bible, family, friends
    Questions 2 Love all my vodka infused hops, and elderberrys
    Question 3 No farm animals just a cat still trying to find a soft cat food she really likes..
    Have a blessed long Labor day Weekend.

  8. Hi Tara,
    Since we haven’t heated with wood for the past few years, we have an ample supply of seasoned firewood; but, do have a bit more to cut up, this time using the new battery electric chain saw. Our next task with trees will be tapping the maples; but, they have already been marked to make them easier to see once the leaves are gone.
    Ruger is BTW a great name for both a dog and a gun and he seems to be the smart one, choosing air conditioned comfort. I didn’t know about the honeysuckle and we don’t have a lot of it here; but, like the clover and the dandelions, we mostly leave them alone for the bees.
    Interesting you mentioned the Farrier. Ours was here Friday for just the normal trim, since our little horse runs around shoeless. We’ve been using this guy for a lot of years and he knows his horses. As for your Amish farrier, I think often the Amish treat horses too much like a commodity, since they are used for nearly everything in their lifestyle, so his lack of gentle handling doesn’t surprise me.
    We had a vet visit on Saturday for the standard yearly checkup and injections for our little horse.
    BTW, I look forward to your questions that always make me stop & think a bit, and here are my responses:

    #1: For morale boosting, I can go out back and either hang out or shoot, watch some TV (DVD’s are nice) or at my age, just get a snack and a nap. Age has its privilege LOL. We also keep hard candy and other snacks on hand and the DW can bake cookies at the drop of a hat. Snickerdoodles are my favorite and there are always enough ingredients on hand for those. Hanging out on the back of the property and just sitting quietly and paying attention to all of the sounds around you, is for me, very comforting and I can sometimes do it without falling asleep. There are also board games and decks of cards to play Euchre or other games. We also have a ton of books and eBooks; but, the books would probably be of little use to me unless someone was willing to read to me, LOL.

    #2: My favorite home remedy has to do with bleeding, and mostly nosebleeds, since I was once on anticoagulants and nosebleeds were common. Cayenne pepper works; but, our FAK contains WoundSeal, Quikclot, generic Neosynephrine and cotton balls, and small sport tampons. We also have a large supply of the Coban elastic wrap, purchased in quantity from a Veterinarian supply years ago. I guess most of this is not really natural; but, we keep quantities ahead and will deal with natural when this stuff may no longer be available.
    We also keep a large supply of local honey on hand and that can be used for a lot of things and I’ll be making Elderberry tincture as soon as I can find Elderberries at a reasonable price.

    #3: Livestock care is possible, with the help of neighbors who have the skills and tools I don’t. We count on the Assistance of a MAG in a pinch and that’s the real reason we have such groups.

    This past week we did or acquired the following:
    1. Received & programmed a Midland WR120 NOAA weather radio. This one has a larger display than my current one and has facility for an external antenna, that will help us get away from the radio noise generated by many modern electronic items. In addition, you don’t have to find in set the FIPS codes, since all states, counties, and events are in the radio selectable by name.
    2. 6 cans of each Progresso and Campbell’s soups, tucked away in their respective places in the Cansolidator.
    3. Two additional bags of dry cat food
    4. Snagged a few more preparedness eBooks:
    https://www.fema.gov/pdf/library/f&web.pdf
    https://www.ready.alaska.gov/Documents/Alaska%207-day%20Emergency%20Kit.pdf
    5. Ordered two: Rachael Ray Cucina Stoneware 9-Inch x 5-Inch Loaf Pans from Woot, Inc. (woot.com). We ordered a pizza stone last year and have been amazed at the difference stoneware can make when baking.
    6. Ordered two Abco Tech Water Resistant Wireless Bluetooth Speakers with Suction Cup & Hands-Free Speakerphone from woot.com. These can be used in the shower or outside without fear of getting them wet, like other electronics.
    7. Ordered a 12 pack of: STERILITE 6 Quart/5.7 Liter ClearView Latch Storage Boxes, from woot.com. These shoebox size clear containers should help with our ongoing decluttering and organization process (I hope, LOL)
    8. The DW & I had lunch with Grammy Prepper and her DH. We had good conversation and she gifted us some very nice heirloom tomatoes, good eating and seeds to start in the spring.
    9. Received an STC-1000 temperature control module I will be using to modify the operation of our new furnace that IMHO has some design defects to lessen the cost. This module will help me correct those defects for less than $15.00, not counting my time.
    10. Received a Factory Reconditioned Parrot AR(Augmented Reality) Drone 2.0 Elite Edition from Woot, Inc. (woot.com) that will be used to get a bird’s eye view of the property like we’ve never seen before.
    11. We received our annual TSC 10% coupon, so the DW will no doubt be doing some shopping since the 10% is for the entire order.. This year also included an additional 5% coupon for cat & dog food, so we will probably purchase a few more bags for our neighbors who run an animal rescue.
    12. Got most of our scrap cardboards and SLA batteries together to take to recycle next week. One less pile of clutter coming soon.

    1. TOP:
      I have been using stoneware for almost twenty years. I buy good quality albeit pricey from Pampered Chef. So far only one piece has chipped. We use it regularly for pizza. It holds up to oven, gas grill and smoker. Also use for brownies and tandori chicken.

    2. I need to ad another morale booster I missed.
      Ham radio lets me talk with the local folks including most of my MAG, plus state wide, national and international and I think engaging with others and getting the news if the cell phones quit and the screens go dark, will be important.

    3. There is one additional thing that some may find odd; but, some may find useful. Going back nearly 60 years, I always enjoyed books, short stories, and movies / TV shows dealing with survival of one sort or another.
      The Weather channel has a series called: ”SOS: How to Survive”, that covers various scenarios, asks how you would survive the event, and then shows the correct things to do. It’s a rather good series; but, another miniseries is coming up, starting tomorrow night (Tuesday 9/4/2018) on the USA Network. It is called ”The Purge” and appears to be based on the movie of the same name, where one day per year, all laws are suspended and you may kill, rob, or otherwise treat your neighbors with impunity. I have it set to record; but, will be watching it (alone, LOL) from the perspective of protecting me and mine from the marauders. This one night, would be an example of what a post SHTF WROL environment could be like, and while it is only a fictional account, it brings together other creative minds who may think of things we don’t, in a fashion similar to the various ideas we share and glean, from this community. It’s an admittedly odd perspective; but, one some of you might find useful.

  9. Saw an attorney in a professional capacity for the first time in my life. It will start costing $200 but hopefully that will take care of the matter.
    Ordered and received a pair of cut resistant gloves. Picked up some hamburger for $1.77 a pound – it is in the freezer and I might try canning something new – hamburger. Also picked up $20 worth of tri-tip – its cut up and in the freezer waiting form me to have time to can it. Going to try something else new – cooking down the beef fat for storage.
    Hope to have more and better to report next week.

    Answers:
    Q1 – books, knitting, dvds, sewing (I really do know how to hand sew)
    Q2 – none
    Q3 – only a 10 year cat at home so he gets his canned cat food (heaven help me if I forget)

    1. suzy q:

      I used to buy “cut resistant” police gloves for motorcycling. I’ve fallend enough to know the hands go first.

    2. Hamburger is not hard to can. Just brown it and break it up first. Don’t be afraid to can the fat with it. It will keep it from drying out. just heat it in the jar a bit after opening and you can rinse fat off with hot water, if you want.

      Make sure the jar rims are very clean before adding lids. I wipe with a dry piece of paper towel, then a piece dipped in hot water

      That meat can be used in many ways, of course.

      NEVER raw-pack hamburger. You’ll lose your mind trying to work it out of the jar!

      1. Livinthedream,

        NEVER raw-pack hamburger. You’ll lose your mind trying to work it out of the jar!

        I’ve never raw packed it; but, hadn’t thought about it getting stuck in the jar. I expect that would take a knife and fork to cut and pull out the pieces.
        If you used the smaller pint & half pint jars with just a taper and no lip, it might work
        I can picture it now, the first time you try to “dump” that single chunk from the jar, LOL.

  10. 1)Morale Booster is my supply of vacuum sealed chocolate candies. Did a taste test a few months back and after 5 years they are still good. They only thing that failed was the candy bars with nuts in them, so they have a short shelf life which means they have to be consumed every few weeks…😂😊

    2) Go to remedy, so far have been lucky on not being ill. If needed it would be the elderberry recipe BamBam put on the blog many years ago.

    3) Taking care of the cattle up until three years ago fell upon my shoulders. Blessed we trained one lead cow an she was easy to work with, she would bring the others home when they broke out of their pasture to visit the neighbor. After dh’s emergency surgeries we had to divest ourselves of the animals with the exception of the blind horse. She knows her pasture and is pampered, because of the food she receives she is healthier than most horses I have seen due to the unhealth way they are fed.

  11. Hello to one and all
    We are still here, when time allows I do a quick review of all the hard work everyone is putting in on their places.
    Do to all the fires around us working outside without a mask was not possible. Found it difficult at times to be outside due to the heat/humidity from the air drops. Gave up trying since there were days you could not see a 1/4 mile sometimes even less. Had one fire 100% contained, but the one to the north us went on high blaze due to the intense winds. Now the valley is filled with smoke, and not healthy to be outside again.

    Costco run picked up t.paper/paper towels/dog biscuits, dog and cat food from the pet store. Gassed up the car, picked up items from the health food store, soda for dh, then back home. Had to cut shopping short every time I was in town due to the smoke levels, so the above had to be done a little at a time. Past 33 days have been awful, so hopefully it rains soon to rid us this mess.

    1. I can’t imagine what you are going through. We are at least 750 miles to the East but have had some haze from time to time from the fires out West. Take care.

  12. Here is something interesting….

    https://immigration.procon.org/view.resource.php?resourceID=005535

    https://www.nytimes.com/elections/results/president

    Do we see a commonality here?

    States that issue driver licenses to illegal immigrants should not be allowed to send their votes to federal elections. Contact the US electoral voting commission. They are aiding and abetting known criminals. Its the definition of that law. They know they are here illegally and they are giving them things including FAKE ID which is a felony.

    1. Thor1,

      Here is something interesting….

      No surprises here except maybe Utah.
      I guess it depends on how closely these get checked. The DW & I do not sign our credit cards and instead write “See Photo ID” instead of the signature. Most of the time the person checks; but, on occasion they just run the card without a word, in which case we point it out to them. Of course the chip cards or places where you swipe don’t involve a human. If jurisdictions insist on doing this, they better make them very distinctive, and not at all resembling the official “Real ID” standards.

      1. I put CID on the back of mine. When they look, some say, Who’s Cid? Duh. Then I explain it to them. The looks on their faces! Pricesless!

    2. Without going into too much detail,

      (1) I firmly believe that the children of American service members should be American citizens, regardless of the age at which they come into the US. The military practically encourages fraternization with a wink and a nudge. (Hubby was at a base in Southeast Asia where a door to the local saloon was built into the wall surrounding the military compound.) We should take responsibility for our actions.

      (2). I’m glad my stepdaughter was able to get a California driver’s license.

      (3). There are many sides to the immigration debate. Our side is paved with lots of checks to immigration lawyers, to no avail (so far), and a mountain of frustration. It’s ridiculous. But it shouldn’t be painted with a broad brush. My stepdaughter has a master’s in nursing. If she could become legal, she’d be a working, tax-paying, useful member of our society, filling a critical need. (Just like the illegal Mexicans picking lettuce and tomatoes fill a critical need. Americans don’t want those jobs, no matter how down-on-their-luck they are, so the crops would rot in the fields otherwise. In Maine we have to import Jamaicans to pick the apple crop, despite 10+% unemployment in some parts of the state. Can’t force people to move to take work, according to the state labor department.)

  13. It has been very busy lately. The garden has had a terrific year, but starting to see signs of an early fall. Production has fallen on some of the plants. Need another frost free month for potatoes and sweet potatoes to finish.

    On a quick trip to the Front Range, hiked almost ten miles with some of the offspring. The increase in altitude slowed my time by three minutes per mile. But enjoyed the time with the kids and was pleased I could keep up.

    Silent inflation continues. We bought bags of salt for the softener. Price was the same but the amount had decreased by 5 pounds.

    Answers to Tara’s questions:
    1. Edibles: chocolate in various forms. Non-edibles include books and quilting/sewing materials.
    2. I grow various herbs including horehound.
    3. Have a cat that rivals Thor’s dog. She kept the grasshoppers at bay this summer and is quite the huntress.
    We will also be able to help nearby relatives with their chickens if needed.

    1. Moe,

      Silent inflation continues. We bought bags of salt for the softener. Price was the same but the amount had decreased by 5 pounds.

      I find this interesting since we get our salt from Aldi’s whose price per pound hasn’t changed or from Home Depot, who gives you a free bag if you purchase 10, so 11 bags for the price of 10.

      2. I grow various herbs including horehound.

      Thanks for the mention of horehound. It will growin Ohio and I hadn’t thought of it, although we do keep some of that nasty “candy?” on hand.

      1. TOP:
        The price may be a reflection of our isolation then. It is over 100 miles to the nearest Home Depot. Not sure there is even an Aldi’s in the entire state.

        1. Moe,

          The price may be a reflection of our isolation then. It is over 100 miles to the nearest Home Depot. Not sure there is even an Aldi’s in the entire state.

          That could well be the case, since transportation of large heavy low profit items like salt could be a big factor in the price plus there are vast salt mines only 100 miles from my location.
          This brings up yet another good reason to settle in Ohio. Our weather is rather temperate, with no huge heating or cooling degree days on average. For ham radio we have the Hamvention, the largest ham radio flea market and swap meet in the world, and for the shooters, the national matches are held at camp Perry, about 2 hours north of my location. We do get the occasional tornado; but, not at all like those in Texas, Kansas, Nebraska, and other states in tornado alley; but, also no hurricanes, wildfires, or earthquakes. Our rainfall is moderate so no real drought or flooding and lots of very productive farmland.
          To this we can add abundant salt deposits, which I hadn’t really thought about before now as a reason to be here. About 2,000 feet under Lake Erie, 30 miles east of Cleveland in Fairport Harbor, Ohio, you’ll find a vast site called the Morton Salt Mine. Cargill maintains three mines in the US, including one 1,800 feet below Cleveland, as well as bedded deposits in New York.
          Salt has always been an important commodity and was actually used by the roman legions to pay their troops. A soldier’s pay, consisting in part of salt — came to be known as solarium argentum, from which we derive the word salary. A soldier’s salary was cut if he ‘was not worth his salt,’ a phrase that came into being because the Greeks and Romans often bought slaves with salt.
          It is also said to be from this that we get the word soldier: ‘sal dare’, meaning to give salt. Salt was a vital commodity to the Roman army and this demand was met by establishing military salt works.
          And now you know, LOL.

  14. No significant purchases this week. I have now started all five jobs. The checks will start rolling in in two weeks.

    For moral I stock dried fruits. I have 600 lbs. of oatmeal in #10 cans. Dried fruits will help with the taste. My dh plays guitar and sings. I should pick him up some extra strings. I am not really much of a candy person. I stock whisky and vodka for medicinal purposes. I have thousands of books on my external hard drive and we have plenty of board games.

    When the checks start rolling in I want to purchase a solar unit for recharging cell phones and notebook computers. I am looking at Goal Zero. But I would sure like some advise. I want to charge two iPhone 8 plus and two Mac Book Pros.

    I test for my brown belt this week, probably Thursday. I will spend a minimum of four months at brown belt and four months at red belt. (These belts typically take longer.) Then I will be eligible to test for black belt. Now that I am working exclusively online, I plan on attending more cardio kickboxing classes. I need to get in better shape to pass the black belt fitness test.

    A hurricane formed off the coast of Africa and there is a disturbance projected to develop into a tropical storm and then move into the gulf. We are ready.

    1. Bam Bam,

      For moral I stock dried fruits. I have 600 lbs. of oatmeal in #10 cans. Dried fruits will help with the taste.

      That’s a lot of oatmeal. We only have about 100 lbs; but, when prepared into breakfast or cookies, it goes pretty far. We have some dried and freeze dried fruits and will be making more; but, I personally like my oatmeal, cream of wheat, and corn meal mush with brown sugar or maple syrup that we keep on hand or can make.

      My dh plays guitar and sings. I should pick him up some extra strings.

      I totally forgot about playing guitar. I have two I keep in their stands for easy access and one in a case plus a mandolin I’m still learning to play and have extra strings on hand for the guitars. I personally like Martin Silk & Steel, for the type of music I play.

      I stock whisky and vodka for medicinal purposes. I have thousands of books on my external hard drive and we have plenty of board games.

      PGA & dark rum here, plus some good beer and Mikes hard lemonaid, also for medicinal purposes of course, LOL.
      I have over 800 eBooks and Magazines and 175 audio books plus about 50 downloaded videos and numerous DVD and VHS videos. I’m in the process of converting the VHS to digital format for longevity and less power required to watch them. We also have some board games we rarely play and numerous decks of cards.

      When the checks start rolling in I want to purchase a solar unit for recharging cell phones and notebook computers. I am looking at Goal Zero. But I would sure like some advise. I want to charge two iPhone 8 plus and two Mac Book Pros.

      It comes down to cost vs. time to charge. If you let your device battery go nearly dead and need a quick charge with power no longer coming from the wall, then you’ll need, high capacity which is high dollar. If however you can manage your devices and keep them charging when not in use, one of these might work for you.
      I have two of these: Zunammy Solar Charger for All Smart Devices https://www.amazon.com/Zunammy-Solar-Charger-Smart-devices/dp/B01MREPSZ1
      I have one of these: Hiluckey 10000mAh Waterproof Solar Power Bank Portable Phone Charger With LED Flashlight for iPhone, iPad, Tablets and Cell Phones https://www.amazon.com/Hiluckey-10000mAh-Waterproof-Portable-Flashlight/dp/B01HZ3NMR2
      Also keep in mind that in a long term widespread power outage, you’ll likely have no cell phone service; but, the computers and tablets will still work for things like inventory management and book reading.

      I test for my brown belt this week, probably Thursday. I will spend a minimum of four months at brown belt and four months at red belt. (These belts typically take longer.) Then I will be eligible to test for black belt. Now that I am working exclusively online, I plan on attending more cardio kickboxing classes. I need to get in better shape to pass the black belt fitness test.

      I had forgotten that the Korean arts have those colored belts. In college I helped start and run a Dojo with a guy trained in Tang Soo Do who had his red belt, equivalent to my 2nd degree brown belt at the time. Good luck with your testing.

      1. O.P. I got the stomach flu this week and haven’t been to the school to test. Hopefully, I can test Tuesday–if I am feeling up to it. I would really like your suggestion (and amazon link) as to what product we should purchase. We are not interested in fast charging. We are interested in keeping our phones and computers up and running after a hurricane. (We have two iPhone 8 Plus and two MacBook Pros.) Can you also suggest a car charger? (I must admit that I am entirely ignorant on this matter. It is the one area of prepping that eludes me.)

  15. Hello,

    I’m in Indiana for the long weekend heading home tomorrow. Drove up Friday, staying with a friend. We went to the Huber’s Farm in Starlight, IN yesterday, and had a big time. They grow all type of food, so I bought a bushel of silver king corn, 15 lbs of Concord grapes, 9lb of flat stringless green beans that I can’t remember what they are called, 2 spaghetti squash, 2 butternut squash and loaf of parmesan and garlic cheese bread. Then we went to eat at Joe Huber’s restaurant, and I mistakenly ordered a family style order of country fried chicken and slice of ham, that came with chicken and dumplings, lima beans, real mashed potatoes, green beans all in family sized bowls for sharing, and fried biscuits. Needless to say I have been eating on it, and finally finished it off today for my late lunch at 4pm… I have one more biscuit and chicken breast left for my breakfast in the morning… Headed back home in the morning.

    On my way home, I will be picking up 2, yes 2, Excalibur 9 tray dehydrators I found for $80 on FB marketplace… One was used only once. I missed the meetup driving up and so plans are to meet tomorrow off I-65 and 1 1/2 hours from home. I may dehydrate the corn… Not sure yet.

    I moved out of my booth’s at the antique mall on Friday… Was blessed that the owner bought all my shelving and tables so I didn’t have to move them.. I’d still be there moving stuff if I had to move those… Someone else bought the show case so I didn’t have to move it either… God is good. Then, I hired a guy to help me pack up everything else and take them over to my friend’s house so we can have the yard sale mid Sept… It took longer than planned, hence missing the meetup on the way to Indiana. I also listed some things on FB Marketplace, and already have some more things sold when I get back to work. I brought my antique cast iron bath tub home, and put it in the garage for now… I can always sell it later when the dust settles if I ever want to get rid of it.

    I found some really nice/heavy bungie cords today at an antique mall. They are 2′ in length and there were 3 of them.

    Thanks Dara, for the info on Honeysuckle… I would have never thought to dry the flowers. I have a volunteer patch of it that is blooming again I will be working on clearing out this fall when the weather is more tolerable. It’s in the wrong place and I don’t know how it even got there. Maybe create a controlled patch.

    I agree with you on the Amish, as they do treat their livestock as a commodity… I’ve seen some very thin horses, bad hay to eat, weary, overworked, tied up in the hot sun with no water … It’s not right. And there’s no sense in forcing or hitting for any reason. Most horses that I’ve dealt with, and it’s in the 100’s, truly want to please, but don’t understand what they are supposed to do. Being mean to them only makes a situation worse. Abuse of those that can’t speak for themselves will be dealt with in another life.

    Questions:

    1. If talking grid down – Playing cards, Monopoly, other games, books, finding like minded folks to talk to and share “sea” stories with… If talking grid up – computer, going places, learning new things, eating food that I haven’t eaten and trying new recipes.

    2. None particular. Want to make some tinctures and my own Elderberry syrup this year. I will freeze it in one cup increments so it will last. Also some salves using comfrey and plantain.

    3. No livestock, but 2 old cats… One LOVE chicken and cheese… The other eats dry cat food, so have stocked up a few bags… They are good mousers.

    Prayers for everyone, the President and for America.

    1. Almost There,
      I almost wish I’d known you were at Huber Joe’s Family Farm Orchard & Restaurant in Borden, IN. Looking at your travel time & distance from home and ours from here, that’s nearly the halfway point and perhaps we could have had a meetup. I’m not sure however that I could have handled a meetup with both you and GrammyPrepper in the same month, LOL.

    2. Wow, what a great deal on the dehydrators! Our county has a Facebook online auction page and several community trading posts, checking them out once a week is the only time I really ever get on Facebook – not a fan. Glad to be of help about the honeysuckle. If you have ironweed growing, save it as well, it also has a myriad of medicinal uses.

  16. Besides most of what others have already mentioned, I also have a large collection of jigsaw puzzles to keep folks occupied if there’s no grid to keep us “plugged in”. Besides essential oils and elderberry syrup, I have a rather large stockpile of colloidal silver put back…..the livestock question is a little more challenging, considering I have 5 dogs, 3 cats, 9 goats, and 25 chickens! The dogs are fed raw meat, so we’ll be doing a lot of hunting. The cats will have to fend for themselves….as it is, they have killed and consumed squirrels, rabbits, and lots of frogs from our canals….they might get skinny, but they’ll survive. We live out in the country and have lots of Brazilian Pepper trees, Australian Pine Trees, and Palm Fronds to feed to the goats, along with stuff from my garden. They’re chowing down on all the extra okra I planted this summer. They eat old plants that are no longer producing like broccoli, green beans, etc. It will be a lot of work, but we’ll manage…

    1. Goatlover,

      Besides most of what others have already mentioned, I also have a large collection of jigsaw puzzles to keep folks occupied if there’s no grid to keep us “plugged in”.

      I grew up putting together Jigsaw puzzles, and there was a card table that always had one being solved as a family project. As you would walk by, you might stop and place a single piece. I’ll have to check; but, I suspect there are still a ton of them back at the old house in PA, now owned by my sister, and I might just have to snag a few.

      Besides essential oils and elderberry syrup, I have a rather large stockpile of colloidal silver put back

      We can’t really use essential oils to a large degree, since the DW is highly sensitive to many of them. Aroma therapy doesn’t help her; but, can give her a breathing issue, similar to an asthma attack. As for colloidal silver, I’m still a bit skeptical for all but external topical use; but, my big issue is potential drug interactions with the pharmaceuticals that keep me alive and moderately healthy. If I need colloidal silver it is easy enough to make, requiring only pure silver (I have several pounds) and electricity that I have or can make in abundance. Testing the purity may be performed with table salt &/or a laser, both of which are ubiquitous today.

      1. I am a huge fan of colloidal silver. My Bobby makes his own and uses it as both a preventative and when we get sick. It works so quickly ever single time I feel a sore throat or sinus/ear issue coming on. I treat myself naturally and have not had the need to go to a doctor in over a decade for anything except eye exam to get new contacts and glasses.

        1. Tara,

          I treat myself naturally and have not had the need to go to a doctor in over a decade for anything except eye exam to get new contacts and glasses.

          I’m happy for you; but, then again you are still rather young (20 years my junior). At your age I had my first (and only) quadruple cardiac bypass, a consequence of poor eating habits as a youth; but, much more from a genetic predisposition. My DW OTOH has no real issues with cholesterol and other factors that affected me, and her father ate bacon and eggs for breakfast nearly every day of his life, and had lipid (cholesterol) values I would kill for, LOL.
          I have numerous modern medical devices keeping me alive and while I like to have “natural” remedies available, at some level I need to keep using the medications that have been keeping me running for decades and hopefully for decades into the future.
          I look at the natural remedies as something to keep on hand in case medications I need are unavailable.

    2. GoatLover,

      Will you herd eat cabbage? That is the only non-producing plant my goats refuse to eat. They go nuts for the broccoli and green beans, but I end up having to pick up the cabbage leavings and toss them into the compost pile. They don’t care for lettuce much either, but my flocks don’t mind devouring all of any extra lettuce that I have. I dehydrate lettuce when I have time, I got into the habit when we rescued three Sulcata tortoises to help keep down on the expensive fresh veggies feed costs during the winter.

  17. I like reading everyone’s comments before I post my own response. Helps me think of things I might have forgotten otherwise!

    Our best ‘prep’ this week, if you will, was a wonderful afternoon spent getting to know TOP and his DW! My DH tends to be very skeptical meeting new people. But over the course of the years, the few people he’s been introduced to, that I have met on line, have proven to him that I too can be skeptical, and that I am usually a good judge of character, LOL! While I gifted TOP with some heirloom tomatoes, he gifted us with a neat little book about building up food stores, as well as a couple of nifty emergency light bulbs that will be put to good use!

    While the garden has gone to the dogs, (I should have caged the tomato plants rather than staking them and will do so next year), they are still producing and a couple still have flowers coming on. I have already frozen several large jars. Pulling out the dehyrator next. DH has proclaimed that he is ‘tomatoed out’ and can’t believe the harvest from our small 4×6 garden. My fall crop of snap peas were looking a little sickly, and since they are in a container, I am feeding them with Miracle Grow a couple of times a week. I only had one plant in the spring/summer, and 3 made it for fall crop, so I hope to have enough to freeze some.

    I have a portable, small plastic greenhouse that my mom got me last Christmas. Question to our OH people in particular, but anyone in NE climates, how do I best utilize this, since I have established garden beds that aren’t practical for using it (but dabble in container gardening too)? I have seed starting taken care of, indoors.

    For Tara’s questions:

    Morale boosters: I have started picking up board games at the thrift store, trying to cover all ages.Decks of cards and card games like uno. Crayons, coloring books, and some crafting type stuff to keep the kiddos busy. I also have a ton of books, fiction and non fiction, physical and on the kindle and laptop. Comfort food should definitely play a part in this, and while I can feed them, I should pay more attention to the little thing like hard candies and snacks.

    Fave home remedies: I’ve mentioned before, my local honey/lemon/plus concoction for allergies/colds. I am wanting to do elderberry syrup/tincture in the near future. Garlic. I have recently been asked to join The Grow Network ‘street team’ (Marjory Wildcraft’s website), and as part of that i have access to all the Master Class Certifications they offer, and have begun the home/herbal medicine class.

    Livestock: Since all we have at this point is the beagle, if it truly came down to it, he can eat the leftovers! But i do stock up on food for him. I would imagine it would be easier to provide for smaller livestock like chickens and rabbits in SHTF than larger livestock like cows/pigs/horses. So this would definitely need to be a consideration as we consider adding livestock in the future.

    LTD: You have permission to share my contact info with your friend in OH. I can definitely help her make contacts, as can TOP.

    Thor, Puppy knows he did wrong obviously, as he couldn’t face DW on Facetime, made me laugh!

    AntiqueCollector, I am praying for you and DH, dealing with the fires and the smoke. I can’t begin to imagine how difficult that is.

    To all of the Pack, love and prayers all around! Have a great week!

    1. Grammyprepper,
      I like reading everyone’s comments before I post my own response. Helps me think of things I might have forgotten otherwise!
      I normally do the same, and with judicious use of various email addresses I also get to capture my own comments, some of which took some research to put together..

      Our best ‘prep’ this week, if you will, was a wonderful afternoon spent getting to know TOP and his DW! My DH tends to be very skeptical meeting new people. But over the course of the years, the few people he’s been introduced to, that I have met on line, have proven to him that I too can be skeptical, and that I am usually a good judge of character, LOL! While I gifted TOP with some heirloom tomatoes, he gifted us with a neat little book about building up food stores, as well as a couple of nifty emergency light bulbs that will be put to good use!

      My D W also had a good time and as soon as we can get everything planned and in good shape, we’re planning on attending the OHG gathering in a few weeks. She can also be skeptical; but, so far, all of the few meet up’s we’ve had were quite positive, except for one in Toledo where only two of us showed up and a local one where nobody showed up.
      And on those LED bulbs, remember that they don’t work with dimmers and need to be turned on some of the time to charge their batteries. Properly charged they should last 6-8 hours on battery and have a 20,000 hour life, like most LED bulbs.

      I have a portable, small plastic greenhouse that my mom got me last Christmas. Question to our OH people in particular, but anyone in NE climates, how do I best utilize this, since I have established garden beds that aren’t practical for using it (but dabble in container gardening too)? I have seed starting taken care of, indoors.

      We have a larger (8x6x6) not at all portable greenhouse we assembled last May, and have just been monitoring for now. Daytime temperatures easily reach over 100° with the door and vents wide open, so for now we keep an eye on it and have some container tomatoes we’re going to try and stretch into the late fall & early winter. I’ve wanted this greenhouse (from Harbor Freight) for years, and this falls into the “be careful what you ask for” category, since now that we have it, we’re trying to figure out the best, most practical way to use it, LOL.

      Comfort food should definitely play a part in this, and while I can feed them, I should pay more attention to the little thing like hard candies and snacks.

      We picked up some Claeys Old fashioned Sugar coated hard candy drops (Since 1919) at Riral King and they are delicious. They have numerous flavors; but, we tried the root beer, sassafras, and raspberry. I avoided the horehound since I have bad memories of that as a kid; but, we may try that as we try others on our next visit. The sassafras tastes just like the sassafras tea I make fresh when I can get it.
      For snacks, toll house and Snickerdoodle cookies are always a hit with me, LOL.

      Fave home remedies: I’ve mentioned before, my local honey/lemon/plus concoction for allergies/colds.

      I know; but, could you please list the recipe again?

      I am wanting to do elderberry syrup/tincture in the near future.

      Same here, I’ve been pricing the elderberries and already have plenty of PGA on hand, LOL.

      Garlic.

      I was just looking through ours today and we’re looking where and how much to plant next month.

      I have recently been asked to join The Grow Network ‘street team’ (Marjory Wildcraft’s website), and as part of that i have access to all the Master Class Certifications they offer, and have begun the home/herbal medicine class.

      I had the same invitation and dismissed it. Do you think it is worthwhile? For general prepping I can and have taught most things; but, this is an area (herbal & natural medicine) where I am way behind, and don’t know how much I can offer. With my health issues I also need to be careful with potential interactions that are not always discussed and sometimes dismissed.

      I would imagine it would be easier to provide for smaller livestock like chickens and rabbits in SHTF than larger livestock like cows/pigs/horses. So this would definitely need to be a consideration as we consider adding livestock in the future.

      Chickens, rabbits, and even goats are pretty easy to feed. Horses can live on just hay, as can cattle, if you don’t mind the rather flavorless grass fed beef, and have enough pasture for your animals to graze. Pigs can and will eat almost anything; but, some grain and scrap (slop) also helps. Most hog farmers leave empty containers by the kitchen door where cucumber peels, stale bread, melon rinds, and a variety of other foodstuffs: a mishmash of grains and produce known informally as slop that is downright disgusting to humans, delightful for pigs. On the farm, the pigs are known as the garbage disposals, and unlike city folks, this scrap is not ground up and flushed down the kitchen drain; but, turned into ham & bacon.

      1. Marjory is pretty awesome, met her once and we have mutual friends. Her courses are usually great for nearly all levels, there should at least be one or two new or enhanced tidbits to learn even for the extreme seasoned, like yourself. I was teasing our son-in-law recently when he was fussing about something and reminded him we have guns and hogs – meaning it would be mighty easy to kill someone and never have the body be found, lol pigs are the trash compactors of the livestock world, that’s for sure.

        1. Tara,

          I was teasing our son-in-law recently when he was fussing about something and reminded him we have guns and hogs – meaning it would be mighty easy to kill someone and never have the body be found, lol pigs are the trash compactors of the livestock world, that’s for sure.

          I assume you’ve read “Unintended Consequences” by John Ross. I have an original hardback purchased new 22 years ago that’s been handed around to many people. It’s still in nearly pristine condition with the dust cover. I see this same book online for $50 to $100+ but for now I’m holding on to mine.
          Those who have read it will definitely get the hogs reference, LOL.

    2. Grammy,

      Sounds like you are all set on morale boosters. I did a recipe, I am not sure it was here it might have been for New Life On A Homestead, on how to make prepper candy. Kernel corn and sugar basically and it keeps forever. Pack, I trust y’all with my email and happy to help anyone who might want survival retreat evaluating and buying help and to help preppers in Ohio connect – [email protected]

      1. Tara,

        I trust y’all with my email and happy to help anyone who might want survival retreat evaluating and buying help and to help preppers in Ohio connect – [email protected]

        I can do the same and already have a lot of the pack from all over the country, Florida to Massachusetts, to Arizona & California. You can click on my name and there’s a link on that site for email, or just use [email protected] with an appropriate subject line and your Nom De Plume somewhere in the body.
        I didn’t list this on the other site, since it would go into moderation and often take days to come out.
        Your prepper candy recipe would be good to have; but, if you have sugar, flour, oil, and some baking powder or baking soda & cream of tartar, you can make tons of cakes, cookies, and fudge. Throw in a campfire and a Dutch oven and you can do them all even without modern power sources. By stocking sugar, honey, and maple syrup you have the basic fixin’s for lots of tasty treats.

  18. A very sad happenning in the LEO community in central OH. I first learned of this on Fox news, and now the local news is reporting it. K9 officer forced to shoot his canine partner after being attacked during training. I am heartbroken for the officer and his family. A local trainer of K9 officers suggested that perhaps there was a health issue with the dog. Regardless, a sad situation all around.

    https://www.nbc4i.com/news/local-news/cpd-officer-forced-to-shoot-k9-partner-after-being-attacked/1411875671

    1. Grammyprepper,

      A very sad happenning in the LEO community in central OH. I first learned of this on Fox news, and now the local news is reporting it. K9 officer forced to shoot his canine partner after being attacked during training.

      I saw this on local news (CBS affiliate @ 0600). I found the story online and sent the link to Sirius who is a long time dog handler, with that same breed, a Belgian Malinois, so perhaps he’ll chime in here with a more expert opinion.

      1. Having owned a Belgian Malinois (or, should I say, having been owned by a Malinois) (rest in peace, DaisyDog!), I can say that they are brilliant, almost intuitive, talented, very train-able, but with a stubborn and willful streak. Daisy was a sweet cuddle-hound most times. At other times, she was a mean, grumpy little beeyatch. It’s not a stretch to imagine that an inexperienced handler would react badly to a mean, grumpy episode, sad as it may be. It didn’t have to end that way. Malinois are GREAT dogs, but I no longer have the patience or persistence to put up with another one. Still, I loved every day of having Daisy (or her having me). Still miss her.

      2. What a tragic incident. Ohio has been full of strange and sad things this past week or so. The story you mentioned, the Fentanyl in the air ducts at RCI in my neck of the woods, and the shooting on Fountain Square in Cincy. It seems the weirdest things tend to happen most in Ohio and Florida for some reason. When I was writing breaking and crime news for the Inquisitr, every time I grabbed a trending topic about a horrific or weird crime I could toss a coin and guess the Buckeye State or the Sunshine State and be right the vast majority of the time!

    2. Grammyprepper,

      I was rather astounded to hear of the police K-9 attacking its handler. I’ve never heard of such a thing before and I’ve been around police K-9s since 1974. I’m sure its happened before, I just haven’t heard of it. So it must be a very rare occurrence.Very sad thing as I’m sure the handler is very upset over what he had to do. I’m very curious as to the cause of the attack and I too hope Sirius can provide a potential reason or two.

      Many years ago the Air Force had guard dogs who were always borderline psycho dogs and were used to guard nuke facilities. Those dogs would attack their handlers on occasion. They only knew one command, attack. The handler had to literally drag the dog off their target, so the handlers were always big strong guys. Guard dogs had to be euthanized when they were retired as they were much too dangerous. The Air Force stopped using attack dogs in the early 70s I think, and went to patrol dogs which were trained to work on command and eventually became the military K-9s we see today which are very much like police K-9s in temperament and skills.

      1. Zulu 3-6,

        I’ve never heard of such a thing before and I’ve been around police K-9s since 1974. I’m sure its happened before, I just haven’t heard of it

        While I’ve not been around police K-9’s much, I have been around other areas of expertise and interests, and I’m finding the same thing. I think it’s a combination of 24 hour news, trying to fill the void on slow news days, along with email and social media sites, like this one. I have been in email contact with you and others here, and telephone or personal contact with some also, and most of the people would have never crossed my path without email, social media, and unlimited long distance telephony. Had I seen that same dog attack with the local LEO 15-20 years ago, I would not have had folks like you and Sirius to communicate with and email was spotty at best. We live in a brave new world with easy & inexpensive global communications, and need to keep some perspective. Growing up, I was pretty much a free range kid and would travel into the local woods all day with a canteen, sack lunch, a pocket knife, and hand axe and have no reason to believe that somewhere on the west coast a 12 year old may have been abducted and killed. Living in PA, 2500+ miles away, that event would have been unnoticed, or only mentioned in a small column on page 5; but, that same event today, will fill all of the 24 hours news channels incessantly, and will all too often make both the parents and the kids all over the country, scared to leave the house. I think the best thing all of us can do is to stay informed; but, keep a perspective (and a firearm) close at hand.

      2. Zulu,

        I sent this in an email to TOP earlier, and he told me you guys were talking about it here, so I thought I’d chime in…

        “I read the K9 article. If the handler needed surgery, it was definitely a “Serious” bite. As a handler, we are all trained to handle a dog “coming up leash”. Sometimes, they get the better of you. If you are getting mauled, punching and kicking are authorized. I think this cop lost it, got scared, and pulled his duty weapon. Granted, the article was only an AP blurb. I have had enough dogs come up leash on me, and have seen it happen many times. This guy may or may not get fired. That’s up to his department. I do not think he’ll ever be allowed to work a dog again.”

        GrammyPrepper mentioned a possible medical injury. I got bitten just for that issue. Our port director wanted to put the dog down. I told her with some controlled aggression training, he’d make a good patrol dog. So they gave him to the LA Harbor Police. They took Charlie to their vet and low and behold, and exposed nerve on his tooth. No wonder he was grumpy. When he bit me, he hit a nerve in my forearm and it took about a day or so to move my hand fully again.

        Zulu, regarding the AF dogs, you’ve come to the right resource. The guard dogs you talk about were called Sentry Dogs. You might as well just call those pups Land Sharks. And you’re right, they had to be choked off the target. DOD decided to do away with the Sentry Dog program after Viet Nam. A lot of the dogs were retrained for Patrol Work. I worked one of those dogs in Korea for a brief time. Toby was one of the last Retrained Sentry Dogs in 1987. I was his handler when he had to be euthanized. All Military Working Dogs had to be euthanized until the 1990’s when Clinton signed an Executive Order allowing MWD’s who could be, to be adopted out. Even today, there are a few who just cannot be adopted out. Not unless they go with their original handler.

        1. Sirius,

          I couldn’t remember exactly what the AF called those dogs. I saw a demo with them once in the late 1960s when I was a kid in the Civil Air Patrol, at Wurtsmith AFB in Michigan. The handler was massive himself and the dog did indeed have to be choked out. I remember the dog’s name though: Hitler.

          Yeah, the K-9 handler must have had a bad bite if they put a TQ on him. I think his days as a dog handler are over too.

          1. Sirius,

            A senior Green Beret officer once told me of a NATO exercise in Europe at a US Air Force base sometime in the early 70s. The OpFor were British SAS playing SPETNAZ. During the planning, the SAS plainly told the USAF NOT to use their sentry dogs.

            The USAF figured the SAS was just trying to get a edge and put the sentry dogs out anyway. They lost several dogs as a result. The SAS people didn’t play when big nasty dogs attacked them. Likely still don’t.

          1. Thor1, That last article from theweek.com is absolute horse hockey. We added odors to our dogs palate all the time. Some odors got dropped. Besides, if the dog alerts, even on a small amount it’s probable cause to search. Guess how many minor traffic stops turn into major cases? And before you suggest it, there are alcohol sniffing dogs. They don’t work so well for civil departments. (It’s too tough to get the training aids safely, i.e. drunk people.) But for schools when you want to find beer cans, they work great.

  19. I’m a little late to the party. Back in late May I posted that I had my right knee rebuilt and many posted for results and when I got my left knee done. Well the right knee is great I would say 85-90% new. The Left knee was done Tuesday August 28 and things are different. Tuesday Night after 24 hours without food I browbeat a nurse to get me a decent evening meal well it didn’t sit well with me and I brought it up. To punish me I was put on a clear liquid diet for 24 hours. Then Wednesday night my doctors PA came in and didn’t get all of the Purell off of his hands. He shook my hand and After he left I wiped my eyes and all hell broke loose. Did I say all hell broke loose that is an understatement. That crap burned like acid in my eyes. 2 liters of saline solution and 2 hours of flushing didn’t do much. So, I was given 2 Oxycodone pills and a sleeping pill. This was at 9PM. I woke up at 11 PM and was able to somewhat see again without pain and watering eyes. I left the hospital on Thursday I’m safer at home. My wife says I’m pushing too hard and should slow down. Tuesday I will try the gym and the elliptical trainer and I have an appointment with the physical therapist. Sunday, we cleaned most of the garage out and I set up a double wall locker for ammo, powder and gun stuff. I found 500 rounds of 9mm JHP I forgot I had and placed 20 – 30 rd. AR mags. Into it. I also cleaned out an alcove in the garage to hold some of our long-term food supplies. I forgot how much we had. Then Sunday evening our son came home with a “Sweet Sixteen” Apple tree he got for free because the person said it wasn’t producing. WELL patience and proper placement works. I will give it 3 – 5years but I expect it to produce sooner. As for my Knee only, time and exercise will win the race. In May the doctor said I wouldn’t be able to do a flat garden this year so I over compensated with my container garden. WOW the Blue Lakes beans really grew it was better then my raised bed and less room. I canned and pickled more than I did last year and am still producing.
    I must get the left knee working since September 29 We will be in Juneau doing 3 defaulted storage auctions for Juneau Self Storage. So, if any of you are in the neighborhood come by and say hi.

  20. I just had an absolutely wonderful weekend. Children and grandchildren as well as some honorary children part of Friday, all day Saturday and all day Sunday at the cabin/ aka BOL. It was great, particularly as it is hard to get everyone together at one time due to all the things everyone is involved in. We had BBQ, baked beans, coleslaw, potato salad and various other yummy stuff. I never had a better time.

    I did manage to recycle our emergency storage gasoline. I change it out every two years, refilling the cans with double charge of STABIL to avoid varnish buildup. It’s a pain but is the only way I know to keep fresh gasoline.
    Continuing to harvest from the gardens. Production is not as good as usual, due to my inability to prepare the gardens properly. I like to cover the gardens after last harvesting with about three inches of horse manure, turning that into the soil in the spring. Our soil is terrible – mostly loess, but after these years of enriching the gardens, they are much better. Anyway, I was preventing from doing that last year. Looking forward to better gardens for next year.

      1. I’m not too sure about that energy thing! I have to really force myself to do things. At my age, it is entirely too easy to just veg, but there is the responsibility. I believe I have a duty to educate my grandsons. So, we have grandfather/grandson talks. I can freely tell them things their parents would never think to tell them. We have had extremely frank talks on sex, politics, the problems they are already encountering. These boys are proficient shooters and politically conservative. I’m trying to prepare them now for the onslaught of politically correct brainwashing coming their way, particularly in college. It’s OK to be a white man. White privilege is a lie. Thankfully, my close friend of 30 years is black and is their honorary uncle, as well as my honorary son. Immensely helpful. It is a big job for us all. I told them it might be necessary to choose between faking it or fighting it and it will not be an easy decision.

        1. Billy T,
          I think another responsibility on your part is that someone gave their life for you to continue yours, so living a long prosperous and useful life should be imperative, both for the grand kids, and a grateful thank you to the donor and family. Or as the physicist and observer of humanity Albert Einstein stated: “Strive not to be a success, but rather to be of value.”

          White privilege is a lie

          In general I agree; but, I think where any privilege comes from are loving parents and other adults who guide our youth on a path where moderate risk and hard work are just part of the lifestyle. Your grand children are indeed privileged, and your firm guidance and little talks are part of the privilege.

          1. I am intensely grateful to the donor’s family – unknown to me. I have wondered if it was a man or woman, black, brown, white or what. Prior to the transplant, my black honorary son and I were speculating whether the lungs from a black man would “increase my brotherhood”! We decided it wouldn’t. For a couple years when I was much younger, I was a bouncer at a very large disco as a part time job. By the time I quit that job, I was very fluent in jive! Almost all of our patrons were young and black. When I started, I made it a point to know as many as I could – they were mostly regulars. That made things a LOT easier than they would have been otherwise. I never thought I was a tough guy, but you do what you have to do. It’s not as hard if you know who you are dealing with.

          2. I so agree that the privilege comes from the home environment, with the economic health of the family playing only a small part in that. I get boiling mad when I hear about how low income neighborhoods, underfunded schools, a lack of jobs, and the availability of drugs are to blame for inner city crime – for people of all colors in those neighborhoods. We have those same set of circumstances in my poor rural county, but no gangs, no shootings (even though 98 percent of the populace is armed and learned to shoot by age 10) and almost no violent crime – maybe one or two incidents above a bar fist fight every year or so. It is the difference in the home life and society the children are raised that makes the difference. I feel so bad for the decent people in those bad neighborhoods, especially the older folks who lived there for years and saw the place before it turned bad, I can’t imagine being stuck somewhere like that because of not being able to afford to move. Actually, I would not be stuck, I would save up every dime I had for a used camper or a tent and raise my children off grid in a campground, even rotating campgrounds if there was a time limit for staying, to get them and myself out of such a situation – or go in on a house where everyone slept on blow up mattresses, with other neighbors who couldn’t afford to move on their own.

        2. Billy T, it sounds like you are helping to raise them right and have a good outside influence with your honorary loved one to provide another equally valuable perspective on life and the experiences that will come their way.

          1. Tara,

            I so agree that the privilege comes from the home environment, with the economic health of the family playing only a small part in that. I get boiling mad when I hear about how low income neighborhoods, underfunded schools, a lack of jobs, and the availability of drugs are to blame for inner city crime – for people of all colors in those neighborhoods. We have those same set of circumstances in my poor rural county, but no gangs, no shootings (even though 98 percent of the populace is armed and learned to shoot by age 10) and almost no violent crime,

            I’ve spent a lot of time over the years in your county and those surrounding it, and you are correct about the poverty, however, most of the hard scrabble people I’ve met and known over the years are some of the most hard working and giving people around. Driving in the area around deer season will often find deer hanging everywhere as they are being cleaned and prepared for aging and butchering. I know most people have gardens as well.
            A much more significant and larger example than even your county is of cource the great depression during most of the 1930’s where poverty was rampant; but, crime was actually very low.
            We may think of some of the violence from the Al Capone’s of this world; but, those were a direct result of alcohol prohibition from 1919-1933 and had nothing to do with the depression per se.

  21. There have been several K9s killed lately, I posted some sites but they are in cyberspace…..

    2 were killed by an illegal alien, my blood boils. They were search and rescue dogs non-agressive.

    I feel hatred……

      1. Definitely a puppy person! Cats, fish, and frogs are really the only critters I have no love for. I had a cat once, Rocky, brought it home from the Kroger parking lot when two boys were trying to give it away. Their mom gave them an hour to find it a home or let it go because their new rental did not allow pets. I had no intention of getting a cat, but couldn’t stand to see it turned loose in town and get killed. BEST CAT EVER. Rocky acted like a dog. He went to the door to go out and go potty, never climbed on the furniture, could back down my beloved Fluffy (part Chow, part cute who lived to be 17) and beat up all the dogs in the neighborhood that tried to mess with it. The only thing Rocky was afraid of was our duck. I have a hilarious video somewhere of the duck chasing the cat off the deck. I would pull up after work and the cat, dog, and duck would all walk out together to meet me.

    1. Thor1…

      Prayers for you and extra for your DW… Has she tried any Graviola? Please keep us posted.

      On the dogs… Shameful.

    2. Terrible. Most of the dogs I have known were better people than many of the people I have known. A properly treated dog will never desert you, never hurt you and many will willingly give up their lives to defend you. Having a dog will also make you healthier, have better blood pressure and extend your life. Oh, and make you happier too.

      1. Billy T,

        I read an article the other day about a bear that invaded someone’s home. The family’s FIVE-pound dog went after the bear, barking and trying to distract it. The dog succeeded, but was killed in the process. Brave little critter.

          1. “It ain’t the size of the dog in the fight. It’s the size of the fight in the dog”.

            Never, EVER forget that if you are working dogs.

          2. Sirius ,

            Never, EVER forget that if you are working dogs.

            Or being challenged by any dog.
            My father worked for the post office / postal service for 38 years in various management positions, one of which was managing the carriers. It was well known as fact and not just myth, that the carriers rarely had problems with the big dogs; but, often had to avoid or spray the little ones. I think being small must just inculcate an attitude in dogs.
            There also seems to be something inbred or instinctual about going after someone in uniform.

          3. OP – oldest daughter’s dog did not like the boyfriend that showed up in full uniform. She should have paid attention to the dog’s intuition sooner.

          4. GA Red,

            oldest daughter’s dog did not like the boyfriend that showed up in full uniform. She should have paid attention to the dog’s intuition sooner.

            From my limited experience it had nothing to do with the intuition of the dog about the person. Mail carriers, meter readers and milk men (back as a kid they had uniforms) and package delivery like UPS & FedEx all seemed to get the same treatment. Some odd thing about the uniform from what I could tell.

    3. Thor1,

      There have been several K9s killed lately, I posted some sites but they are in cyberspace…..
      2 were killed by an illegal alien, my blood boils. They were search and rescue dogs non-agressive.

      I think the search part may be the problem, since if they find an illegal hiding and alert, that person would be taken into custody and deported unless of course they are carrying illegal contraband, in which case they could be incarcerated, in which case killing the dog might make sense to their perverted immoral way of thinking. We need the wall

      I feel hatred……

      Hatred eats at your soul. Resolve is a better emotion.

      1. TOP, we just need to take the gloves off with these people. Use trained GSDs not beagles. Then you got the left wanting to abolish ICE….. They have lost their minds if they ever had them…..

  22. Alert !!!

    Yesterday a plane landed in New York with multiple sick people onboard from overseas and was quarantined.

    Today 2 planes landed in Philadelphia with similar circumstances.

    Pandemic…..??? Terror attack ???

    1. Thor1,

      Yesterday a plane landed in New York with multiple sick people onboard from overseas and was quarantined.

      The passengers were from Paris & Germany and the NYC health department determined that those who were sick had either the flu or a cold. After evaluation all were released.

      Today 2 planes landed in Philadelphia with similar circumstances.

      The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention sent a team to evaluate and determined the same thing. As it turned out, some of these people were returning from the Hajj (their pilgrimage to Mecca) where a huge influenza outbreak is known to be in progress, so couple that small Mecca epidemic along with the tight quarters and recycled air of a long flight, you just get sick people getting sicker and spreading their germs & viruses.

      Pandemic…..??? Terror attack ???

      Neither, just sick people and maybe a really small epidemic.

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