What I Did to Prep This Week

What I Did to Prep This Week – Week 32 – Feb 17th – Feb 23rd 2019

prep week 32

Good morning Pack. It has been a week or so of dealing with flood water – with temperatures ranging from a high of 73 degrees all the way back down to 30 degrees. The ground is simply saturated and still frozen solid more than a few inches down from the surface. Mother Nature has given us a run for our money this year…and it’s only February.

We were flooded several days in a row more than twice twice this month. On a multitude of other days both our road and our creek were either impassible entirely or feasible to drive upon only by those brave at heart and still possessing ample youthful bravado – who also had either a 4-wheel drive or 6-wheel drive vehicle.

The creek is now more than twice as wide as what it was. We are now in the midst of fence mending. Untangling barbed wire wrapped around downed trees after the bank caved in took hours over the course of several days. Doing chores together often serves as date night around here – something I USUALLY enjoy.

flood water

Within the course of just about three hours, the largest storm of 2019 so far, totally changed the landscape of our property. Because the creek is in the bottom portion of the property, near the beginning of our one-fourth of a mile farm road, it is always an adventure driving down bottom to see just how badly our creek misbehaved… this time.

Local and short-term natural disasters should always be in the forefront of your mind, not just the long-term TEOTWAWKI SHTF type of events. Even the most diligent preppers can get a tad unfocused on the mundane seasonal mishaps because we come to expect them to behave exactly as they always. That is so not always the case.

We were prepared for this most recent round of flooding as far as food and immediate needs go. Some tribe members did climb out on a felled tree and we worked some extra comfort provisions across using a rope, cooler, and duct tape. We surely could have done without the extra items, but it was nice to have them – especially the chocolate.

moving supplies on a rope over a river

Having the tribe members come over also allowed us to get a report about what our property looked like on the other side of the creek, since we couldn’t see how far the flood water had gotten into the hay fields.

But man, I was not exactly ready for the workload that came next. There is no waiting around for better weather or when you are not so tired when it comes to livestock and fencing. If a horse would have walked to that section of fencing to get a drink or tried to walk through the creek where the grass was literally greener, they would have gotten tangled in the barbed wire – which can kill a panicked horse.

If the horses had gone into that hayfield undetected, they also could have been caught on the wrong side of the creek if the water came up again – which it did about two hours after we finished mending the fence.

The hay field is not fenced in, so if they wanted to go walkabout on the road, which happened once last year due to a young tribe member having no clue how to shut a dang gate, I would not have been able to get them. Our tribe members who brought us morale boosters could have in theory, but getting a horse trailer off their hill and back up it even once, let alone multiple times to transport the entire herd of critters, is not a realistic backup plan.

The water in the creek was moving fast. I doubt our mini donkeys and pony would have made it across safely if they had tried to get back – the horses probably would not have either.

Dealing with the aftermath of the flood and once again working on turning our road into something that actually resembled a road, mostly rounded out or preps for the week. We also dealt with a sick Cowgirl and her puppies. She went off alone in the woods three times, we found her twice and brought her back to her bed in the garage, but the third time we felt that she had passed away.

She was drinking but not eating for nearly two days. Yet, she showed back up the following morning. Cowgirl is our daughter’s dog and lives next door in her cabin, but we have kept her and the puppies in our warm garage for a few weeks since Brea is space limited and eight puppies, even in a cage most of the day, can make a lot of mess.

Cowgirl had worms and we were flooded in with no extra worm medicines. I am not a fan of commercially manufactured animal medications anymore than I am most human medicines. I prefer to preventatively treat potential health issues naturally. Bobby buys manufactured worm and flea medicine for his dog, but I treat mine naturally. Jovie and Ruger just turned three on Valentine’s Day and she has been healthy and worm free, while Ruger has bouts with lethargy and stomach aches.

Bobby shakes his head a lot at my natural remedies, but has had to growing admit they work – without harmful side effects. You know, all those things the announcer guy in medicine commercials ticks off faster than an auctioneer at the end of the commercial?

We gave Cowgirl and her pups garlic and apple cider vinegar in their water. Dogs so do not like the smell or taste of garlic, but we managed to get it down them. By morning, all of the dogs had expelled the largest round worms I had ever seen and were eating heartily again and wagging their tails. The apple cider vinegar makes the environment inside the body too alkaline for the worms to survive. Garlic is a natural anti-toxin.

This Week’s Questions:

1. If flooding is a possible problem in your area, how are you prepping for it or dealing with such a natural disaster?
2. What morale booster items do you stockpile or would miss most if you did not have them even in the short term?
3. What home remedies do you use to treat your domestic pets and/or livestock?
4. How did you prep this week?

Tara Dodrill

About Tara Dodrill

Tara Dodrill is a homesteading and survival journalist and author. She lives on a small ranch with her family in Appalachia. She has been both a host and frequent guest on preparedness radio shows. In addition to the publication of her first book, 'Power Grid Down: How to Prepare, Survive, and Thrive after the Lights go Out', Dodrill also travels to offer prepping tips and hands-on training and survival camps and expos.
View all posts by Tara Dodrill →

102 thoughts on “What I Did to Prep This Week – Week 32 – Feb 17th – Feb 23rd 2019

  1. Not much happening here. Getting ready for a gun show coming up; it will be interesting to see what the public is thinging.

    Cold with a little snow this week. This moring it’s 16 outside, the warmest it’s been all week.

    Received: Tarred braded nylon twine (320#/138’); silicone-treated pistol storage socks; screen protector for Kindle Fire HD 8; Mernickle PS6 holster, black for G19X w/CTC Light; AF Freeze Dried Cheese, #10: Colby, Mozzarella, Cheddar,

    1. This Week’s Questions:

      1. If flooding is a possible problem in your area, how are you prepping for it or dealing with such a natural disaster? With our house at 5000+ feet, most of you should hope we don’t have a flooding problem!

      2. What morale booster items do you stockpile or would miss most if you did not have them even in the short term? Games, books, and candy!

      3. What home remedies do you use to treat your domestic pets and/or livestock? None

    2. JP,

      Received: Tarred braded nylon twine

      Around here we call that tarred bank line, and it’s very useful in the field. I’ve made a few nets with it, and the slightly sticky texture helps make that a rather easy one person job.

        1. JP,

          We used to use it to wrap cables together to keep the equipment racks some sort of neat.

          So your not talking about tarred bank line; but, something a bit different.
          I have some rolls of that also. A heavy close packed nylon coated with beeswax used to make a series of half hitch loops down a cable bundle. I did and saw this done in Telco offices; but, think that piece of kit and the know how is probably now a lost art. Now days, people just use a ton of nylon tie wraps / zip ties and quite honestly I do the same.

          1. JP,

            This is what I bought:

            That’s exactly what I have, Tarred Bank Line. It’s good for outdoor projects; but, the tar on it makes it kind of dirty and impractical for some indoor things.
            For detail on the net you can make, search for “making a net using tarred bank line”.

            The studd we used in the Army was flat, black, about 1/4″ to 3/8″ wide, and tarred/waxy. It’s been awhile since I used it. This stuff goes everywhere and makes a great shelter binding.

            That sound similar to what we used in Telco, except it was kind of a yellowish nylon impregnated with soft wax, probably beeswax.

          2. JP,
            I meant to mention that I think that Catahoula Manufacturing is one of the better brands and the ”Braided” Nylon Twine is better than the less expensive ”Twisted” variety, since the cut pieces don’t unravel when trying to use them.

  2. Tara, so sorry to read about your travails but it’s good to see you’re okay.
    Questions:
    1- I bought our house in a level neighborhood up on a low hilltop. We’re all about 70’ above and half mile from a river which is saltwater. To the south, a dam with a pond which is 20’ lower. If it somehow failed (?) the water would head in another direction. I do have pumps from where we used to live but flooding is the least of my worries. Thank God.

    2- I’d miss beer as a morale booster. I’ve got a lot of books and games. Fortunately, I grew up pre internet so I can make do.

    3- I confess woeful ignorance on the subject of natural remedies. We have no livestock other than a very protective Golden Retriever. He gets a lot of love and brushing.

    4- For our preps this week, we got more work done upstairs. I researched more homes in Monroe County, TN. Cleaning and reorganizing continues apace. Nursed a cold and am putting the finishing touches on an order of freeze dried food from Ready Made Resources.

    1. get some fermentation locks and a couple 5 gallon water jugs, while you might not have ingredients for beer there is a lot of other stuff you can ferment for wine, or other drinks that have the same alcohaul as beer. i have used wild grapes, crab and other apples, honey, and maple syrup and made 5 gallon jugs, also dandelion roots as a dandellion beer. used plain white sugar and bread yeast. i don’t drink btw, i just made all that to give away as gifts come holidays. i bottle it in used soda bottles afterwards (washed out bottles).

      1. I suppose I could try it one day but there’s nothing like a cold beer. I’ve turned into my dad. After yard work, I’ll generally polish off a few but they’ve got to be in glass bottles.

    2. Monroe has a lot of Bottom land near the rivers. Make sure the house is at least a couple HUNDRED feet higher. Just sayin’. 😉 the closer you are to the bSource of the creek the better off you will be.

        1. Well, maybe a hundred would be ok, but after this last deluge, natives here are drying out their basements on land they thought was high enough. Nope, not quite.

  3. Please pray for my husband. He just found his friend and coworker dead. B left work early yesterday not feeling well. My husband is now with B’s son, trying to help him through all of the decisions he’s having to make, dealing with the LEO’s and coroner, etc. This is rough. Husband has known B since they were little.

      1. Moe,

        Unexpected death can throw you for a loop.

        As I age, I think those deaths of friends and family are perhaps my most stressful things. In the past 4 years I’ve lost my best friend, my kid brother and two other friends, all younger than me and another friend who did live into his 90’s.
        The losses leave a hole that I find can only be filled by remembering the good times we all had together, and perhaps shedding an occasional tear.

    1. Well, now a friend/coworker of mine has had a death in her family, and my best friend’s granddaughter (two years old) is in St. Louis Children’s Hospital. The doctors are trying to figure out what’s wrong with her. I fixed food and will be delivering it tomorrow.

        1. Prayers outbound from here. I hope it turns out to be nothing serious. I’d hate for something to happen to my granddaughter (also two). I would probably be a basket case.

  4. not an issue out here, we are a land of marshes and swamps but it never foods up too much, even in the event of a catastrophic flood my place is on a hill 10 feet elevated from the rest of the property which is elevated over another area. would need to be biblical to actaully affect me with flooding.

    don’t stock any serious morale boosters, i may have a sweet tooth and don’t keep a lot of sugary stuff on hand but i can make candy, fudge, cakes, pies, etc easily

    depends on what the problem is i m trying to treat

    didn’t do much this week, sold a little firewood and now only have a little poplar left to sell, otherwise i sold all i had to sell, my neighbors car was recovered abandoned half way across the state and returned by the police on tuesday. still nearly 2 feet of snow on the ground and just still waiting out the winter weather writing budget projections and planting/work schedules for the year.

    1. Wow! Did someone steal the car? Happened to a friend of mine . His car brokedown on the interstate. He just left it and walked to the next exit to call insurance company. When the tow truck arrived, car was gone. (Like maybe he should have made call while in car?) Car was fiund several weeks later and was stripped. Insurance totalled it.

      1. i mentioned it in last weeks “what did you do this week” someone stole his car at 4am on monday of last week, it was parked less than 10 feet from the front door and they figured it would be fine (house only 30-40 feet from road), they never locked it and frequently left the keys in in. they had no thoughts towards security at all. car was driven off then it was found early this week abandoned in a cemetery parking lot half way across the state, nothing stolen out of it, no damage, just an empty ciggarete pack on the floor (neighbors don’t smoke)

  5. Tara-
    Flooding is a danger. Is there any way to create an alternate way out for times when you cannot wait for the water to go down? Conditions such as an early childbirth, appendicitis or stroke need immediate medical attention.

    Answers to questions.
    1. Flooding is a concern. We are a mile from a major river and 1/4 mile from a creek. Furthermore, there is a dam 20 miles upstream. Having said that, we built on the highest ground within the valley, approximately 70 feet above the river. But never say never. We have multiple routes to get above the natural valley-less than 2 miles in distance.

    2. Chocolate, chocolate, wine, and more chocolate.

    3. None.

    4. Limited preps as much of the week was spent travelling from the Sunshine State to the high plains. Due to the storms I had to take a very southern route. Long stretches over bayous and swamps as well as many rivers. Definitely not a good escape route. My DS on the East Coast is correct in his plans to head due North if needed.
    Arrived home to a flu affected DH. I have upped my elderberry intake. Also made it home during the two non-snow days- part of the plan.

    Blizzard this morning but grocery store was not too crowded yesterday. The isolation of this part of the country encourages fuller pantries. Plus we have had a series of storms. Mostly went to buy some makings for an anniversary dinner. Very low key due to DH still under the weather.

    Taking advantage of seed catalog specials even though we still have quite a bit of time before we are frost free.

    1. Moe,

      Is there any way to create an alternate way out for times when you cannot wait for the water to go down? Conditions such as an early childbirth, appendicitis or stroke need immediate medical attention.

      I know the area where Tara lives and since she said there is a clear space for a helipad that is the likely exit for such personal emergencies. Life Flight and other services operate quite a lot for emergencies in many parts of our rural state, unless of course inclement weather grounds the fleet, at which point you would need surface transport.

      1. TOP:
        Good to hear helicopters in your neck of the woods can land anywhere. Here I have never heard of them land anywhere but a helipad (sometimes found in the middle of nowhere) or hospital. So when the tornado struck 30 miles East, casualties were brought by ambulance to the hospital then flown out. We have very flat terrain so a suitable landing area is not the issue.
        Are individuals allowed to call for help?
        Do you have to have a contract with the air service in advance? No contract is needed here but the cost is insane and most health insurance companies will not cover the flight. A supplemental policy with the flight service operating out of our area is one of our preps.

        1. Moe,

          Good to hear helicopters in your neck of the woods can land anywhere. Here I have never heard of them land anywhere but a helipad (sometimes found in the middle of nowhere) or hospital. So when the tornado struck 30 miles East, casualties were brought by ambulance to the hospital then flown out. We have very flat terrain so a suitable landing area is not the issue.

          Nearly all hospitals have a helipad; but, I have seen them land in a cleared farm field, or a school football or baseball field. Often the responding LEO’s will clear a spot on the highway and stop all traffic to make an LZ.

          Are individuals allowed to call for help?

          They can call 911 for help; but, it’s generally the responding EMS that call for the chopper. We have specific tactical frequencies / channels for direct comms with the air assets.

          Do you have to have a contract with the air service in advance? No contract is needed here but the cost is insane and most health insurance companies will not cover the flight. A supplemental policy with the flight service operating out of our area is one of our preps.

          I honestly don’t know; but, when the situation is dire enough to need life flight, everyone seems to manage. I think the EMS personnel on the bird are basically the same as those on the squad / bus / ambulance so the additional cost would be for the wet bird and pilot. I took a few helicopter lessons more than 40 years ago, and back then the wet bird ran about $150.00 per hour; but, I have no idea what it would cost today.

          1. Flight squads are most often critical care/trauma care trained nurses and advanced paramedics, some times a doc is included if the case warrants it.

          2. Grammyprepper, Moe, & all,

            Flight squads are most often critical care/trauma care trained nurses and advanced paramedics, sometimes a doc is included if the case warrants it.

            In an almost prescient turn of events, we are getting more details on one of those helicopters that had an accident, right in Tara’s back yard, so to speak. As it turns out, even EMS can be put in danger when just doing their jobs.
            Helicopter crashes in Southeast Ohio
            http://meigsindypress.com/2019/01/29/helicopter-crashes-in-southeast-ohio/
            UPDATE: NTSB reveals new details in fatal medical chopper crash in Ohio
            https://www.wtap.com/content/news/UPDATE-3-killed-in-medical-helicopter-crash-in-Vinton-County-Ohio-1292019.html

          3. TOP:
            It may be our remote location but the flights out of here run over $60,000 per flight. If a small plane is sent, the tag is over $100,000. On two occasions we signed waivers to take a kid out. The first time the doc thought it was appendicitis-it was not. That was a two hour drive to a town of twenty-five thousand.
            The second time was a mystery and they were talking exploratory surgery on a small ten year old. We opted to drive to the nearest Children’s hospital- about three hours. This time it was a ruptured appendix although she was not on any pain killer during her three day stay at the local ICU.

        2. Our electric co-op contracted with LifeFlite HeliTransport. This lets members (customers) sign up for the service. $10 per month is added to their electric bill.

          Perhaps you could get your utility to look into this?

        3. In Arizona, there are two medivac helicopter companies, excluding the Navajo medivac services. Both the non-Indian companies have a little-known service. For a cost of $40.00 per year each, they will pick you up from any location in the state and ferry you to a hospital. Of course, this payment is made annually, in advance of any need. In addition, it is only for emergency evacuations. It is necessary to sign up with both companies, as it cannot be determined which company will respond to the call. I am not aware if this service is available in any other state. In essence, they agree, for this nominal charge, to accept as full payment from the patient’s insurance company, if any. It might be worth a call to the companies in your state.

          1. It’s interesting that you mention this, Billy. There are ‘services’ available for a yearly fee, that cover any medi-flight you need, wherever you are. They are rather costly. The services in your area are relatively inexpensive to the private companies I have seen advertise overall coverage. However, if you are in a remote area, I would consider that cost ‘insurance’ and perhaps that might be able to be paid for with a HSA or similar. I concur that all who might need it, check into their local services to see if they have something similar available. In OH, it seems that most of the major hospital groups have gone to developing their own air transport systems recently. There used to only be a couple major players, and they are still out there. When I was still in the field, I was working major population areas, and wasn’t aware of any such type programs available. (At that time, we had one local hospital with it’s own air flight team and a statewide group based at other local area hospitals). It seems cost effective to me, in more remote areas, for such groups to offer a ‘subscription’ based service in addition to hospital contracts.

            As TOP mentioned, we recently had a loss in OH in poor weather conditions, where a company decided to make the trip that 2 other flight rescue companies refused. So ‘experience’ of the company involved matters as well.

      2. TOP, Moe, Tara,

        Having a close, open space for a helo to land is nice. But, from experience, it is a nightmare trying to stretcher an injured or sick patient through deep mud that is trying to pull your shoes or boots off. You’re almost guaranteed to drop the stretcher at least once into the mud, unless you have a lot of help on the stretcher, plus a few relief bearers. Made me really feel for those WWI stretcher bearers in the trenches.

          1. Grammyprepper,

            I’ve assisted in corn field pickups locally, and it isn’t a lot of fun. Lots of team work involved, for sure.

            While I don’t think we have ever had need to use it, our county EMA has stretchers & backboards that can be carried on a John Deere Gator for those longer distance hauls. We practice on occasion; but, thankfully haven’t needed to do the real thing. Other than fire rehab we have not been needed for most of our capabilities in a long while, and I hope that stays the norm.

  6. I did my low-carb grocery shopping this week. Added a little to my stash. Cooked my weekly meals.

    Ordered and received new compact Bushnell 10×42 binoculars. My old compacts really needed replacement for some time. I bought them before Desert Storm, and they got a lot of use there and later in police work. The sand in the desert was not good for them.

    Ordered more fish antibiotics and antifungals. I ordered kinds that I don’t already have. I will have to sit down and determine which antibiotics I should store more of as some are commonly used more than others.

    I also ordered (and should get today) a new headlamp that puts out 1,000 lumens on the high setting.

    I wrote a separate post last week about the importance of knowing CPR and the Heimlich Maneuver.
    Granted, CPR is probably a waste of effort in an austere SHTF setting but knowing how to clear an airway obstruction is not. Moreover, in these days of relative normality, knowledge of at least the basics of first aid, CPR, AED use, and airway clearing is important. Those of us who care for children should especially be trained in airway clearance. As I mentioned in my post, my granddaughter choked on a blueberry last week. She had an honest-to-God no air getting through obstruction. In less than 30 seconds, I got her out of her highchair and cleared the obstruction. She was fine and shoving more fruit down her neck within ten minutes (more slowly this time).

    Unlike the average citizen I have extensive emergency medical training and experience as a paramedic, CPR instructor, wilderness first aid instructor, military, and police officer. It used to be so frustrating sometimes to arrive at a medical scene and find all of the adults having panic attacks and doing nothing for the patient because they knew nothing. Then they expected us to pull a miracle out of our ass. Sorry, no nail holes in my hands and feet.

    Not all SHTF events are big hurricanes, EMPs, or the Yellowstone going boom. Simple knowledge can save lives in good times or bad. The Red Cross and American Heart Association provide inexpensive, or even free training. Many fire departments sponsor classes.

    As I thought further about a Plan B in the event abdominal compressions didn’t work on granddaughter, as a paramedic I would have gone in with a pediatric laryngoscope and a set of small Magill forceps. Except I don’t have those items. That left Plan C, a cricothyrotomy. As I don’t have all the proper tools for that, I’d have to improvise. Modern thought on pediatric cricos is to use a large bore IV catheter instead of incisions. I don’t have those either. While I know how to do a surgical crico, I’ve never actually done one and wouldn’t really enjoy doing a crico for the first time on a two-year old that I have a particular fondness for. But I would have tried if the only other option was watching her die.

    I’m going to contemplate whether I should obtain the tools to do a laryngoscopy with Magill forceps and those for a crico, both surgical and needle. For adults and peds. I wouldn’t dare use a crico set except on family in a non-austere setting, and maybe not even then.

    Tara’s Questions:

    #1 – Possible flooding? Some flooding is always possible in my area, this is Florida after all, although I am not located in a FEMA designated flood zone. Plus, I live on the second floor of a reinforced concrete building. All my preps are upstairs with me, so I should be OK unless another biblical flood strikes. In this day and age, God has to be getting upset all over again, so who knows?

    #2 – Morale booster items? As long as I have my books, and hopefully can keep my Kindle charged, I’ll be set. I too grew up before the internet, so I know how to entertain myself (no dirty thoughts please).

    #3 – Home remedies on livestock/pets? None of either to experiment on.

    #4 – Prep this week? See above.

    1. Zulu 3-6:
      Glad to hear granddaughter is ok. IDK if childbirth classes include CPR but they should. I used the Heimlich once on a family member. It works.

      1. Moe,

        I agree they should. It’s been a long time for me, but I don’t know if they do now. I suppose I could ask #1 daughter though she recerts in CPR, etc, once a year anyway as she’s in a USAFR medical unit.

      2. We are required to have current CPR certification, and Neonatal resuscitation certs as well. You never know when something will go weird in childbirth.

    2. Zulu 3-6,

      Unlike the average citizen I have extensive emergency medical training and experience as a paramedic, CPR instructor, wilderness first aid instructor, military, and police officer.

      Are you sure you wouldn’t want to move back up north, LOL. We could use another guy like you..

      It used to be so frustrating sometimes to arrive at a medical scene and find all of the adults having panic attacks and doing nothing for the patient because they knew nothing.

      While I don’t have all of your training, I have been in situations where there was a minor medical emergency, and simply took over, barking commands to the bystanders to call 911, etc, sometimes only to find out that there were trained people standing around sucking on their thumbs in shock, who were quite capable of helping when they were told to do so.
      It takes a mindset to step up and do something; but, it’s a mindset well worth developing, no matter your level of training. I’ll help when & where I can; but, I’m also humble enough to relinquish the scene to someone with more training or experience. The “Don’t just do something, Stand There!!! can be a default for people with training who have not been put to the task of doing something, so don’t ever forget to take charge and ask for help, which sometimes can be all around you.

      1. TOP,

        People who have training in first aid, or even higher levels, often have never had to use those skills in a true emergency situation. Their OODA loop is stuck in Observe. Whereas experienced police officers, paramedics, firefighters can zip through an OODA loop and get busy immediately. Like I was able to do with my granddaughter even though it happened with no warning.

        I have no problem taking charge at an emergency. Lots of experience doing that as a police command officer and a military senior NCO. I also know to get out of the way when the regular first responders get there. In Michigan there is a law that at the scene of a medical emergency, the person with the most training in emergency medical care is in charge. That means a paramedic can be in charge over an MD who is a shrink by specialty and has no advance emergency certifications. I imagine many other states have similar laws.

        1. Zulu 3-6,

          People who have training in first aid, or even higher levels, often have never had to use those skills in a true emergency situation. Their OODA loop is stuck in Observe. Whereas experienced police officers, paramedics, firefighters can zip through an OODA loop and get busy immediately.

          I’m not sure if they are stuck in Observe or cycling between Observe & Orient, since when told to do something, they often jump right to Act once someone has already made the Decision for them. My late best friend was former special forces and was instrumental in me doing what we called ”Stepping Up” to be counted. I think it’s similar to the fear of public speaking; but, once you get started and get your feet wet, so to speak, it becomes second nature, which is of course just fine tuning your OODA loop.

          I also know to get out of the way when the regular first responders get there. In Michigan there is a law that at the scene of a medical emergency, the person with the most training in emergency medical care is in charge.

          Ohio is similar; but, well trained people can sometimes be put at risk since they may not qualify under our good Samaritan law.
          As for the experience taking charge, that is basic Incident Command under ICS & NIMS, which is part of our CERT training and now mandatory for Amateur Radio operators working under the ARES umbrella.

          1. Babycatcher,

            Yep, yep, on the ICS stuff. It comes in handy.

            In our case it’s not only handy; but, required for ARES participation in some cases, like working in the EOC. I’m retaking 100, 200, 700, & 800 online right now. I took them years ago; but, back then it was paper and pencil and the certificates I was issued some 20 years ago are now long lost & gone. The online courses provide a pdf copy of the certificates, that can be more easily stored, copied, and sent to the required parties like the local E.C. (Emergency Coordinator) and my EMA COO (Chief of Operations).
            Do you and yours use ARES connect, which is a portal for operators to register and be offered volunteer opportunities and training. We use it here a lot to offer the training and events and to keep track of hours.
            https://arrl.volunteerhub.com/lp/oh/
            This is the one for TN.
            https://arrl.volunteerhub.com/lp/tn/

          2. Yep, yep on all the ARES stuff. We have lost a bunch of our ham group members, cuz they didn’t want to upgrade to the newest ICS level. I have done 100c and am working on the others now. Between that and the COML training I’m trying to get, it’s a circus around here! I hope the ICS stuff doesn’t become a moving target!

          3. Babycatcher,

            Yep, yep on all the ARES stuff. We have lost a bunch of our ham group members, cuz they didn’t want to upgrade to the newest ICS level.

            We have members still participating in the club and activities like Field Day and the upcoming Ohio NVIS day on Saturday April 27, 2019; but, some of the mostly “know it all” or hobbyists old timers are complaining about the ICS & NIMS training as being too boring. They don’t seem to understand that ham radio has a lot of very expensive spectrum that other entities would love to have, and Emergency Comms is the one thing that gives us leverage to keep what we have.

            I have done 100c and am working on the others now. Between that and the COML training I’m trying to get, it’s a circus around here

            I did them all years ago with paper & pencil; but, have lost those original certificates, so I’m retaking 100, 200, 700, & 800 and we’ll see where it goes from there. The new certificates like the current licenses are pdf copies that can be stashed multiple places and backed up / printed as needed, and that is handy and less likely to be permanently lost.
            Here in Ohio we are looking to use Statewide DMR for much of our wide area comms.

            I hope the ICS stuff doesn’t become a moving target!

            I think the minimum are 100, 200, 700, & 800 to allow interoperability with various teams and within an EOC. Most of us have already been using these concepts within the EMA and CERT teams, and our local LEPC has funding to run additional training programs over the next few months, so we’ll hopefully get others interested.

    3. Zulu, that had to be tough on you. But with your ecperience, I have no doubt you could do an emergecy chric MvGyver style.
      I am glad little one made it thru okay!

      1. Grammyprepper,

        Funny thing, it happened so fast that I don’t remember having an adrenaline let down afterward. I felt calm through the whole thing. When the baby started breathing again, she was faced with a calm grandpa who was soothing her and not yelling and chewing her out for eating blueberries too fast again. They’re her favorites.

        I think if it denigrated into an emergency, improvised cric, adrenaline would have kicked in.

  7. Start with the questions. Flooding, not a concern. I am on near the top of high bank a mile north of the St. Johns river. The river has little fall and will never flood. There is a low spot on the paved road going into town from where I live but in 47 years it has only flooded two or three times and then only six inches of standing water.

    Moral boosters, sugar, coffee, and some creamer and some books on my tablet.

    No remedies for animals.

    My prepping. My wanted to try fermenting vegetables so we got a kit and I have three quarts of sauerkraut going. I started preparing for my summer garden, trouble is summer got her early. For the last week temps have been in the upper eighties. It did finally dry out enough for me to smooth out my side yard with the backhoe, except for a small area. I might hit it again before this weeks rain hits.

  8. 1. If flooding is a possible problem in your area, how are you prepping for it or dealing with such a natural disaster?

    Flooding is possible here even though we’re at the top of a hill, but not a major concern. A few years back, we had the 100 year flood happen and woke to water in our basement. Nothing quite like getting out of bed in the morning and hearing your carpet squish as you walk across the room. The biggest issues we have with flooding otherwise is that people a) don’t know how to drive in the rain (or at all it seems) and b) need better tires. There are roads with areas that get a lot of runoff but generally will be gone within an hour.

    2. What morale booster items do you stockpile or would miss most if you did not have them even in the short term?

    We keep supplies on hand to make chocolate chip cookies and fudge. We also have LOTS of liquor and wine, even though we don’t actually drink much. Lots of books too and I’ve recently gone back to crocheting and sewing as stress reducers.

    3. What home remedies do you use to treat your domestic pets and/or livestock?

    No livestock to treat. I keep a LOT of hair ball medicine on hand for the cats as our current colony has bladder and kidney problems caused in part by hair balls. Otherwise, I haven’t given it much thought.

    4. How did you prep this week?

    For me lately, I’ve been trying to clean out the freezers so I know what I need and use some older items before I have to throw them out, meaning I haven’t been stocking up on much. I have started some seeds for the garden and the DH is getting ready to prepare the garden for planting, if it ever dries long enough to till. I do generally rotate and replace some canned items and paper products on a regular basis, so “prepping” is more on auto-pilot now and less intentional.

    Prayers for all in need.

    1. GA Red,

      I keep a LOT of hair ball medicine on hand for the cats as our current colony has bladder and kidney problems caused in part by hair balls. Otherwise, I haven’t given it much thought.

      A mixture of petroleum jelly and mineral oil works great in a pinche for hairballs, since it forms an oily lubricant that helps hair pass through the GI tract.
      While just mineral oil will work, it is not recommended since it can easily be inhaled by the cat as it is swallowed and can cause potentially fatal lung problems.
      Mixing a bit of flavoring like juice from a can of tune or salmon can make it more palatable for the cat.

  9. 1) Flooding occurs on two sections of the large subdivision we live in at the present time. I have crossed the one we use all the time when it had water over the top but knowing the speed of the water and where the high & low points were I crossed after giving it a good checking over. Nothing as your photos show…yikes. that is not flooding that is a tidal wavy!!

    2) I hate to shop so when I go shopping I stock up for a long time. That way I stay out of the grocery stores an other templating places.

    3) I use food grade DE in the dog & cats food for keeping worms from staying inside their bodies. Also using it as a dusting powder for fleas and ticks rubbing it in close to their skin, especially near the ears, neck areas where those critters like to make a home. It only takes a pinch in their food once every couple of weeks to keep them healthy. Dust them once a month, more if you have a flea infestation for your areas.

    1. #2 Chocolate covered pretzels with Carmel..aka-Snappers.

      Gives me crunchy treat with chocolate & sweet Carmel in a treat. I stock up on these during Christmas sales at Costco, kept in a cool dark room they last two years without degrading.

  10. WDYDTPTW Current Upcoming Posting

    Hi Tara & all,
    It looks like I got the notice of last weeks post and didn’t pay close enough attention, so we’ll try again.

    No floods here; but, lots of surface mud covering that same frozen ground. Our creek is at a rather high stage; but, it is always well below the eastern bank near the house, and most flotsam and jetsam start upstream from us and end up downstream from here. If you are in the Scioto river drainage, then you could well be getting what we send down, LOL.

    Local and short-term natural disasters should always be in the forefront of your mind, not just the long-term TEOTWAWKI SHTF

    I’ve been a volunteer with my county EMA 20 year sthis year and now the DW is joining the group, so this is ever present, as our organization focuses on these kinds of things, and provides training for them also.
    When you state:

    But man, I was not exactly ready for the workload that came next. There is no waiting around for better weather or when you are not so tired when it comes to livestock and fencing.

    All I can say is Amen!!!; however, that same responsibility helps keep us in shape, since cold wet days cannot be spent just lounging around and you ”have” to get up and moving.

    Dealing with the aftermath of the flood and once again working on turning our road into something that actually resembled a road, mostly rounded out or preps for the week.

    We were VERY careful to check the flood maps before purchasing this place, and generally the banks won’t loan money if there is a chance of flooding; but, it seems that you are managing it, as we all need to so with ownership, from a dead well pump to a leaking roof. It’s all part of the self reliant deal.

    We gave Cowgirl and her pups garlic and apple cider vinegar in their water. Dogs so do not like the smell or taste of garlic, but we managed to get it down them.

    Ground raw pumpkin seeds can also help with worms, although we currently have no pumpkin seeds or dogs.
    1. If flooding is a possible problem in your area, how are you prepping for it or dealing with such a natural disaster?
    While our general area can have flooding, our property only gets water on unused areas on the far side of the creek. This was part of our investigation before we purchased; but, living here for two years as a rental and talking with neighbors helped a lot, in that decision.
    2. What morale booster items do you stockpile or would miss most if you did not have them even in the short term?
    We stock chocolate including Almond Joy, Snickers Caramel and Snickers Almond; but, always have enough supplies on hand to make cakes, pies, cookies, and brownies from scratch or box.
    3. What home remedies do you use to treat your domestic pets and/or livestock?
    We recently lost our little goat; but, prior to her loss, mostly from old age, she was constipated and we fed her a mixture of clear Karo syrup and Epson salts, as recommended by our veterinarian.
    4. How did you prep this week?
    This past week we did & acquired the following:
    1. The DW purchased some large semi clear plastic containers to continue the decluttering and organizing.
    2. Ordered a 2 Pack of 16 oz jars of Manuka Honey from woot.com
    3. Received a 3 Pack of Class 10 16GB Micro SD Cards with Adapter from woot.com to add to the off grid and SHTF low power computing systems.
    4. 6 month visit to my cardiologist with no changes in medication or other things, other than to keep up the exercise as soon as the weather breaks (soooooon I hope, LOL.
    5. Signed up for The Sausage Maker” newsletter (sausagemaker.com)
    6. Signed up for “Loges newsletter (logees.com) who has “Fruiting, Rare & Tropical Plants”
    7. 20 additional rolls of toilet paper
    8. Two 24 oz containers of large curd cottage cheese
    9. The DW & I met Grammyprepper and her DH for lunch and she gifted me a Mason Bee house.
    It seems like the lists keep getting shorter; but, that’s probably a good thing, since it means we’re hopefully a bit more prepared than last week

      1. Moe,

        The Logees website is cool thanks for sharing. I loved their video on growing coffee.

        Our local A.M. talk station has a horticulturalist show on Saturdays this time of year through the summer. Ron Wilson host the “In the garden” show and often has tips or sites like this one, which is also new to me; but, seemed interesting. I think he Is syndicated and more may be found here: https://ronwilson.iheart.com/featured/ron-wilson/
        It’s also a call in show, where people have question or plant issues and he tries to answer them.

  11. I havent done much to prep this week. Work had been crazy and worked a bit of OT. Nice paycheck, but boy I needed a break!
    So we had lunch today with TOP and his DW! Parking issues aside, it was great to see them agaon! We seem to have established a tradition of sharing small gifts, which isn’t necessary, but TOP gifted me a really cool multi tool. DH and I are discussimg whosr keychain it goes on LOL!
    We have seen some flooding when the storm sewers have been overwhelmed. We live in a slab ranch, and it’s made me rethink that flooding isn’t a concern. Biit it is not as big a concern foe us as it is for others.
    After reading Charles’ previous post, I did order a new solar charger for our phones. Mt old one just isnt cutting it anymore but itd almost 10 years old. I need something portable when I am at NASCAR races and while campimg, so I will share hoe it works.

    I regularly add ACV to the dog’s water as a preventative and health booster.

  12. #1. Our ranch is located on a major creek. Our lower fields are the first place it can really spread out when in flood… and it certainly did last week and week before due to the magic combo of snow melt from the high country and steady rain over 2 days. The creek came up 16.5 ft the highest since the big hundred year flood in the 90’s where it came up over 20 ft.
    DH has been resurrecting downed pasture fencing and cutting trees up for firewood that traveled on the crest of the creek and dropped on our piece of mud. Just in time for an unusual snowfall of over 8 inches over 48 hours.
    We now wait for the next flood from snowmelt since next week’s temps may get as high as 68. This last one blew out our dam up stream that diverts water we irrigate with. There will be much to do in the next few weeks repairing all this.
    Our black Angus herd was smart enough to stay on high ground during this flood with 5 new calves.
    In the big flood, my son had to wear waders, strap a bale of hay on his back several times to feed our stranded herd, slogging through 18 inches of receding floodwaters. Flopping carp were everywhere. Ah… to be young again. We were safe and dry on high ground. Our road to town is all uphill so we can get out if needed. But why, when you can sit by a hot fire with a good book and cup of hot chocolate watching it snow…I assure you, a rare moment around here.
    #2. I always have a stash of chocolate to feed DH addiction. He gets bored w/o TV, so he stays busy since reading puts him to sleep. I love a good read and there is always a chore or 2 that needs tending.
    The power was off 6 hours after snow let up. Had to bring my 86 yr old neighbor to our cottage heated with propane. It gives food for thought on general preparedness if propane is not available.
    #3. I have not used home remedies for pets and livestock. I keep us stocked up with bovine pinkeye meds, bluecote for wounds, eye salve for the pooches. I do give pureed pumpkin to dogs when they are constipated. I like your idea for worm TX, Dan.
    Your flood pics look very similar to mine.
    Real ready to get back to normal.
    Ps everyone. Be sure all horses are vaccinated before they could stand in flood water and drink it. We lost a beautiful one a friend boarded here when he drank flood water. We think he got an equine virus like tetanus or west nile from mosquito population that mushroomed after all the water receded. Way sad.
    Here’s to spring clean-up.

  13. Hey everybody, looks like I’m late to the party again.LOL

    Puppy is shedding sooooo much, its like every time you brush him you get another dog. There will be German shedder tumbleweeds rolling through the kitchen when you walk by. Every time you vacuum, you get a couple of more dogs.

    The rain has brought several ponds and creeks in my area close to flooding. One pond was actually on the road one morning while I was going to work and caused a little hydroplaning and I was in the bug out vehicle,
    the FWD truck.

    The bug out truck has a heater core starting to leak so I’m going to take it to a shop. Could I change it? You bet,
    but its pain in the butt so I will pay someone else to do it. Which brings me to my biggest prep of the year.

    1) Bought a new Jeep wrangler.😀 it has so many options. Heated seats, heated mirrors, rear defogger, rear wiper, remote start, all terrain tires, driving/fog lights, Bluetooth, Sirius radio, trailer hitch. It has 2 12 volt plugs up front and a USB port. It also has a 12 volt plug in the back. Removable hardtop that can be converted to a soft top. Best of both worlds. I removed the back seat for now which makes it great for getting groceries or taking a GSD for a ride. LOL

    2) Put a new battery in the convertible corvette. The battery was dated 2/10 so I think I got my money’s worth out of that one.

    3) Put new batter terminals on #2 son’s car. They don’t make things like the used to…….

    4) Bought another new pot for the avocado tree, its growing fast.The fruit trees outside are getting covered in blossoms.

    5) The cilantro started growing in the herb planters, Yay.

    Tara’s questions,

    1. If flooding is a possible problem in your area, how are you prepping for it or dealing with such a natural disaster?
    2. What morale booster items do you stockpile or would miss most if you did not have them even in the short term?
    3. What home remedies do you use to treat your domestic pets and/or livestock?

    1. I live on a hill in a valley if that makes sense, a couple of years ago there was a flood, but my house was above it so I feel safe at home but it was like a most around the area. I now have 2 FWD vehicles and a kayak if the water gets too deep.

    2. Beer, vodka, olives, jerky, popcorn juice.

    3. None, but the vets office is about 5 miles down the road, so if SHTF I know where to get some meds.

    Thor’s questions,

    1. Is everyone on the east coast sick of the rain ?
    2. What do you think of the Venezuela crisis? Aid being Fred upon?
    3.Are you ready for SHTF ?

      1. Thor1,
        The accessories on your new Jeep sound a lot like our new CRV. from USB ports to the built in Sirius / XM / AM & FM radio. The one thing we’re getting used to are all of the sensors that beep, chirp, and sometimes even brake when approaching something, even when accelerating to pass.

        Beer, vodka, olives, jerky, popcorn juice.

        What is popcorn juice? LOL.
        Your questions:
        1. Is everyone on the east coast sick of the rain ?
        I’m not there; but, here we are getting tired of it. Tonight is heavy wind here; but, if all that rain were snow instead, I don’t know that anyone would like it better.
        2. What do you think of the Venezuela crisis? Aid being Fred upon?
        I don’t know who Fred is; but, I personally think Maduro’s days are numbered, with the US, the Lima Group, the O.A.S. and many European countries against him.
        3. Are you ready for SHTF ?
        We are ready for anything foreseeable; but, there could be some things, like a 747 crashing on the house that one really has no way to prepare or mitigate.

          1. Thor1,

            popcorn juice is butter…..LOL

            OK, I understand; but, I can already hear the arteries hardening.

            Fred is Freedom Removed Every Day….LOL

            I thought it was a typo for “Fired”; but, in any case, good save, LOL.

            Jeeps aren’t quite SUVs LOL

            True, the SUV is much more comfortable and gets better gas mileage.

            As for the video, are you on the USCCA payroll?

    1. Answers to Thor1’s questions:

      #1 – Probably they are. I’m not on the east coast and we’re only getting rain here and there in the Orlando area. Had some last night, in fact.

      #2 – Venezuela: Things are getting nasty there. I wouldn’t be surprised to hear Maduro was assassinated soon, and by his own bodyguards.

      #3 – Ready for SHTF?: Is anyone really ready? I’ve identified some holes that I want to fill, and are working on them now.

          1. Z36, India is cutting off Pakistan’s water after the last terrorist attack that killed 40 Pakistan guards and police. Its going to get hot and they are both nuclear powers.

          2. Thor1,

            Yeah, they are both nuclear powers, but they’ve had shooting wars before and behaved themselves it that respect. I don’t know what the prevailing winds aloft are like there. A nuke exchange may upset China a great deal if radioactive clouds affect them. We’ll see.

    2. just started getting a little rain here, but its welcome change over the snow, in fact it should compact it down and make it harder so its easier to walk in (not 2 feet mess). warmer today in the 40s so that helps too, but will be -3 again by tuesday. can’t say i’m sick of rain, sick of the snow is more like it

      i know nothing about it

      about as close as i can be

    3. Thor – we have this bright shining thing in the sky today with no rain. It’s amazing! Even more amazing is that there is no rain forecast until Wednesday.

    4. Answer’s to your questions:
      1. Even though we are far from the East Coast we have had a much wetter winter than usual.
      2. I think Venezuela will have turmoil for the foreseeable future.
      3. If you mean widespread SHTF- I constantly pray against it.

      1. Moe, we all pray and hope we don’t have SHTF, but we know it will happen and that’s why we prep.

        We have a chance of snow here Sunday, I’m glad I have a Jeep !!! 😎

        1. Thor1,

          We have a chance of snow here Sunday, I’m glad I have a Jeep !!!

          I used to have a Land Cruiser; but, the new CRV is all wheel drive and can go about anywhere the Jeep or LC went, other than a field that needs the higher clearance.
          We live along a main state highway that gets a lot of attention well before any snow starts flying and our neighbor has a 4WD tractor with both a blade and a snow thrower and keeps us all cleared out, since he uses part of our driveway to access one of his barns. We also provide water and power to that barn, so his machinery like the skid loader are often used here on our projects as needed.

          1. Speaking of snow…

            It started about 8 PM Sunday. By Tuesday AM, we should have 12” of snow (7″ more by COB Tuesday), another 7″ by COB Thursday. They say the snow pack is at 60”, 6” under than average, but I don’t remember this much in my yard since ‘96/97. We are running out of room to put it. We usually have a melt between storms, but not this month so far. My 2WD van is going nowhere until about Thursday when it’s supposed to get above freezing. Had to dig out a path in the back year for the Chiweenie, it’s deeper than she is tall.

            Just got back from my buddy’s house where I keep my camper and truck. Left the van and brought home the quad-cab 3/4 ton diesel 4×4! Feels like I’m driving a monster (8,000+ pounds) compared to the van, but boy does it eat it’s way through the snow.

            I have a trip up north to take this weekend and I don’t want to take the chance with the van, and the stuff won’t fit in the Surbaru.

          2. Thor1,

            Top, well……..
            motorists.org/blog/winter-driving-rwd-fwd-awd-4wd

            Based on the article, you are confusing 4 wheel drive systems like those in your Jeep, and my Land Cruiser and Pickup truck with modern All Wheel Drive systems. My LC had rear wheel drive with 4 wheel low & high ranges and locking hubs on the front. For off road use we use ATV’s or horses around here.

            What Are The Benefits of All-Wheel Drive?

            There are many benefits to having access to a premium All-wheel drive system. In addition to the expected improved traction, drivers can also expect better acceleration in unfavorable weather conditions and superior handling on drier roads. Having access to an AWD system can even mean that drivers have better chances of selling their vehicles with a higher resale value because it can navigate through snow better than a vehicle without AWD. If anything, purchasing a vehicle like the new Honda AWD is an investment. Improving your drive, fuel efficiency, and wallet are all possible with an AWD system!

            From this article.
            https://www.hindererhonda.com/how-all-wheel-drive-works-honda-awd

          3. Top, I don’t understand your statement. There is no confusion on my part, in heavier snow, 4WD is better, light snow AWD is better….

          4. Thor1,

            I don’t understand your statement. There is no confusion on my part, in heavier snow, 4WD is better, light snow AWD is better

            I agree and my point was that for the driving we now do that are mostly paved highways, gravel roads and driveways, and flat fields, the AWD works fine for us. It also depends on your definition of heavy and light snow. Since a heavy snow around here might hit 6-10 inches at worst. I would not even think about taking the new vehicle places I took that old Land Cruiser, often 5 or more miles from any paved road in the woods, or crossing streams that were as deep as 3 feet. That however was 40 or so years ago with a single, more fit and adventurous version of me.

  14. Hi all. Funeral season here. 😞 been to two in the past two weeks, and a close neighbor died unexpectedly on Monday. His is tomorrow. We came thru the flooding fine, though we had to find alternate routes to get home. Three of the 5 were under water!! Unprecedented for this area. The natives here are scratching their heads in amazement. Never seen anything like it. Our pond overflowed, but I don’t think it did any damage to the dam. We shall see when it dries out more. Hope things dry out enough to start garden stuff. Crocuses and daffodils are blooming. Bradford pears are starting to bud. If we get a late freeze, we might be in a heap of mess.

    1. If flooding is a possible problem in your area, how are you prepping for it or dealing with such a natural disaster? This is the first experience we have had here with it, so we have to sort thru or alternatives. We hunkered down, for the most part.

    2. What morale booster items do you stockpile or would miss most if you did not have them even in the short term? Chocolate as in candy. We have some, but I do have cocoa I can bake with.

    3. What home remedies do you use to treat your domestic pets and/or livestock? Don’t use home remedies, yet. But I have them when the opportunity presents itself.

  15. Again not a lot but did attend a presentation on dealing with poo when cascadia goes. Underground pipes will break so true indoor plumbing will be a thing of the past and most people have no idea of how to handle 1 and 2 safely.
    Monopoly was good on Thursday. I ended up with a free jug of liquid plumber and a free salad.
    I am over 90 feet above sea level and river level so I should be ok up to and including the tsunami. I haven’t designed the baby cat lately so I should do that but since he is 11 I’ll have to be careful. While purchased supplies are skimpy knowledge gleaned is always good.

  16. Tara, It strikes me you have a great opportunity to convert some of that water power to electrical power with a Pelton wheel powered generator. I wish we had a free flowing stream.

    We are located high above any flooding possibility.

    Morale boosting items: lots of hard candy. ability to make cakes, pies, cookies, etc. Books for reading. DVDs for movie watching, given the presence of electricity. Board games. Orchard and the ability to make cider.
    That was the real story of “Johnny Appleseed” – he traveled around planting apple trees for settlers, for a fee, so they would be able to make cider. The settlers wanted to have their alcohol!

    No preps for the last week.

    1. Billy T,

      Tara, It strikes me you have a great opportunity to convert some of that water power to electrical power with a Pelton wheel powered generator. I wish we had a free flowing stream.

      It of course depends on the configuration of that flooding stream. Our creek runs year around; but, the ford has only a trickle during most of the summer and floods well over my head in spring. We are considering placing some type of structure or wall just upstream of the ford to make a small low head dam. That could allow it to use a low head Pelton wheel during most of the year; but, not in spring, however, an adjustable position undershot water wheel might be usable in spring. We’ve been mulling this over for year trying to determine how to build it and then bring the power from the little generator the 200+ feet to the house, possibly using a high voltage wild DC transmission line.

      DVDs for movie watching, given the presence of electricity.

      Today a small system like a Raspberry Pi with a DVD player and a small HDTV or HDMI capable monitor would do the trick and not sap much power. Smaller screen self contained DVD players are available for $50.00 and under, that would also fit the bill, although converting these DVD’s to digital (MPEG / Mpeg4) ahead of time would probably work better and require less power to watch, since you’re not powering the motor on the player.

      That was the real story of “Johnny Appleseed” – he traveled around planting apple trees for settlers, for a fee, so they would be able to make cider. The settlers wanted to have their alcohol!

      Those apples were also used to make vinegar (ACV) for preservation of meats & vegetables. Since any fruit can be used to make a crude wine and grains can be used for beer, that actually saved the world. People knew for centuries that beer and wine were safe to drink, even when they knew that water could be deadly. What they didn’t know was that simply boiling the water would make it safe to drink, and the alcohol just made it a little better anyway.
      Additionally, the thick porridge that they mixed for the beer was also a good way to store grain and solved the problem of spoilage.
      There is a good documentary on this subject:
      How Beer Saved the World
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pcLasNk4i-c
      Enjoy.

  17. A lot of things has Happened this last week, several horrific things averted.. for many of the Pack members his week.
    Tara: that was truly a bad week. Now do your assessment what you can change to minimize impact for another time. leave a vehicle on other side of the creek? and make a foot bridge on higher ground?
    Zulu.. Congratulations on ekking the Grand baby thru this ordeal without upsetting things any more. commendations for calmness! . Please cut those babies blueberries in half, likely hood of choking will be greatly reduced…also any nuts with skins, skin them first ..like peanuts(one of our neighbors children had to have lung surgery/scope procedure. to remove a peanut skin from inside lung( several years ago. He survived. Since you have the training…I would suggest you get the back up items needed for both backup Plan B and C. If the tools are available, another person may need such a back up option . Many have the training to use, but tool kits may not be “handy”.
    Prepared Grammy.. My heart goes out to your DH and his friends family.The co workers family and the family and 2 year old.Prayers offered for all and their support people as well. Sometimes all we can do is offer quiet support./food, and prayers. offer a listening ear.
    Moe on the air evac here, there are several areas they can land in the county.. in city limits, community center. there are some asphalted parking lots that can be blocked off. Out on rural roads they put out flagmen and block roads. the main problem here with landing zones is overhead power lines…Flight care here is comparable to a trauma unit in major hospital. If they can receive a patient that has been stabilized, that patient has a fair chance at survival of most trauma events.
    Ga Red: I hear you I am striving for the auto pilot mode, not quite there, but goal is working toward it.Intentional prepping mode is still on. we have already handled several life changing events and our preps have enabled us to get thru those. I would not say with ease, but smoother than without the things we normally use.
    Preps, no money this week, so no purchases. received some gifts which were appreciated and put into quick use items…drinks, snack foods/chips/nabs/hersheys/fresh fruit, bananas/apples/oranges.
    I have rotated some things from one form to another by taking older canned goods and dehydrating. One gallon of w/c corn=3/4 qt dehydrated. . have second batch in dehydrator..net should be about 2 qts total this week.EACH QT = approx 30- 1/2 cup serv. once rehydrated. Have pulled meats put up in 16 for rotation this coming month.Pulled some snack foods /3 yo good. packed.. had some ground beef rotated from freezer to dehydrated…
    Pulled the oldest canned goods for immediate use and have begun going thru and rechecking all canned goods. Have found some things we did not eat and jars are needed for other foods… if not spoiled will go to chickens. spoiled food has a special place to go.
    Older stored grains that are past prime are being removed from human food section and being rotated into animal feed. Mostly corn meal and self rising flour…the chickens love the cornbread and i am adding a few old herbs etc to it with other additives as i see fit…many jars are being emptied of unused food from parents home and jars are being prepared for coming uses. separated by sizes and jar lid size. in clean boxes and ready to use with quick hot wash/rinse.
    We have received a lot of rain in past 10 days. Chickens are going to need swim fins or web shoes if it does not stop. Yes we are tired of wading thru muddy backyard swamp….. I have put down 2 loads of hardwood sawdust in t he past 10 days. and more is pending. for the two main coops.Have raised each one by 4 inches.. and added sawdust to areas where our pathways are… should make interesting mowing come summer. LOL I have added 2 more wheelbarrow full of mostly composted. manure/sawdust to grow bed. Newly manured is going to separate and new composting area. The fire ants could not find a suitable place for their new mound because of all the rain and they found my compost… and now have a mound in it… so have to feed those. so can turn and manure the pile some more….
    Taras questions…we are not often flooded here, but many roads are closed when heavy rains come suddenly. We stay home. Our animals are secured and we can see their areas from the bedroom window.( those that are not in house). Should our prediction for 10 inches in 36 hours..as has happened in a hurricane residual event..we could need to evacuate. tho we are trying to keep our ditches, drainage areas all cleaned out to increase possible flow.
    #2 My family has an ongoing love/hate relationship with food. We go thru phases where nothing sounds like it will be good. Prescription diets are both carb light and protein heavy..with different permitted foods. we can have sweets but must limit them tightly. I normally will buy a bag of a candy put out 1/2 of it and squirrel the other half… if the bag is full it seems to go quicker. If there is only a little left we cherish it. We stock a limited number of pint jars filled with chocolate bars/mini size, a selection of several kinds of hard candies , butterscotch, peppermint, ass’d hard candy mixes, root beer, and lemon drops. I have these in disguised place to protect them from raiding, and no notation of replenishment needs.. I keep a good heavy supply of Vitamin C drops( ass’d fruit flavors) and cough drops. I keep enough supplies to make cakes, pies,cookies in several flavors..including chocolate.lemon, orange, and pineapple. I have recipes for chocolate pie in,rich chocolate, lactose free and sugar reduced if needed…(same pie) For boredom we have..2 dogs…that is our biggest distraction. also books, and various crafts that the family does individually. We keep traditional popcorn, for munchie attacks. I try to keep several boxes of assorted crackers…saltine,snack rounds, cheezits, club.to use with those I stock canned chicken,turkey ,ham chunks, tuna, smoked sausage.,and vienna . they can be used to make a meat salad or just eaten between meal snack. The thing I would miss most should we not have it is Butter. I have a limited number of ghee in pints. for long term storage. I can sub. coconut oil in recipes,( and it’s shelf life is long.) but the flavor is not the same for dampening the egg skillet..would choose only one or two uses for butter as a daily use all else would be delegated to sun butter recipe or to one of other oils we use.
    #3 For the chickens I have used/Use DE for internal parascites and to add to dust bathing areas for mite control.. DE also kills ticks, I dust any infested areas while dew is still on.. and retreat if rain or and again in 2 weeks. also kills fleas…..also hardwood ashes and sawdust.Oil of oregano and colloidal silver for wound care..and the blu kote spray for chicken backs as they molt. also put oil of oregano in small amount of food for ingestion. Oil of oregano is good wound care and it is soothing to wounds, kills MRSA.It is also soothing to put in ears for ear mites. and kills those by suffication. Tea tree oil repels mosquitoes and ticks.I have one dog who loves Peppermint essential oil it repels fleas and we use it on his midline back and above his tail , behind his ears. to repel any passengers that might be trying to hitchhike. I add ACV to chickens water 2 x a week and dogs at least weekly. I also give dessicated liver or fresh liver after a harsh flea infestation. for a few times..over a week.
    #4 preps are above. Thor’s Q’s/#1 I am in the South east we have been getting hammered by rain for almost 2 weeks are very tired of rain and clouds.We have had days of mostly sunshine. like Ga Red… we had to google it to identify the object in the sky…. #2. Venezuela elections were supposed to have been fair, but info has come out that no one was allowed to run as opposition. Opposing people were incarcerated and worse. That country has a system of voting and a thumbprint is required to vote..To not vote is to identify self as opposition to the leaning s of current dictator or ruler. so yep he had majority of votes.DH speaks some and listens to much Espaniol reports to find out truth of matter from neighboring countries.Countries troops have fired on citizens for getting a bottle of ___? off a burning supply truck. Really bad babies and young children and the elderly are starving to death. Powdered infant formula and rice, etc is not being allowed in to feed the masses. One of the pictures involves a flaming truck. it was a fuel supply so the other trucks would have fuel to distribute the supplies..according to reporters from Columbia.
    #3 I am more ready today for any shtf event that I was last week. Do not think i will truly be ready, but still working at plugging holes i find and securing what we are able to procure.
    #4.. Hardening of the arteries is easily stopped with vitamin K2, Its action is to move the minerals to designated places..result is less plaque and firmer bones.Wally wrld has 2 months supply for 10$. dose is one a day and this vitamin is not consumed in sufficient quantities anywhere in the North American continent.
    Keep on keeping on! we have today to prepare for all tomoro’s… both temporal and eternal.Our family is depending on our best efforts in all we do., whether they believe our planning will be needed or not. Many of the things we prepare for , like the airway obstruction, sudden anaphylactic reactions,we pray we never need… but having those supplies gives us one more item that can enable us to live in comfort of knowing we did everything we could in any given situation.

    1. Anonamo Also,

      Many of the things we prepare for , like the airway obstruction, sudden anaphylactic reactions,we pray we never need… but having those supplies gives us one more item that can enable us to live in comfort of knowing we did everything we could in any given situation.

      This I think sums up the essence of the preparedness lifestyle. Like the premiums we pay for homeowners and vehicle insurance, I really never hope to use that insurance, and pretty much know that whatever my final words may be, it will not be that I wasted money, because I had no car accidents, tornadoes, or house fires.

    2. Oh, AA, you just lit my lightbulb! Dehydrating canned stuff about to go ‘out of date’! Brilliant! We rotate, and send stuff to the local food pantry, but there’s always that stray can…*Forehead smack*

      1. Grammyprepper,

        you just lit my lightbulb! Dehydrating canned stuff about to go ‘out of date’! Brilliant! We rotate, and send stuff to the local food pantry, but there’s always that stray can…*Forehead smack*

        We will often dehydrate or freeze dry frozen vegetables, especially when you can find them on sale; but, repurposing older canned goods is one of those things we ALL should have thought of, LOL. & ditto on the head smack.

    3. Anonamo Also,

      Thanks for the compliment. Luckily, for me I guess, I’ve been involved in so many emergencies that I don’t get too excited anymore.

      My granddaughter loves nuts, including peanuts. But she does not like the taste of the skins, so they have to be peeled anyway for her. People inhaling food particles is a recipe for pneumonia and is definitely a cause for an ER visit. It would be really tough to handle in an austere situation due to the tools, and skills needed, neither of which I have. The patient would require anesthesia as well. I have observed a endoscopic examination of airways but that was once, a long time ago.

      I’m going to get the tools and instruments for relieving airway obstructions. I already have a surgical crico kit and some large bore angiocaths on order and I’m shopping for laryngoscopes and blades. Plus I need a couple of endotracheal tubes of small sizes for pediatric use.

      1. Zulu 3-6,

        People inhaling food particles is a recipe for pneumonia and is definitely a cause for an ER visit. It would be really tough to handle in an austere situation due to the tools, and skills needed, neither of which I have.

        I suspect your GD had a problem that many have when they actually “inhale” food, in that they are always inhaling their food.
        By this I mean eating too fast on the run, instead of taking some time to chew and enjoy, before swallowing. While the DW & I are still fully ambulatory even at our ages, my vision can make me stumble if I don’t pay enough attention, and I see many elderly who fall, simply because they try to move faster than their abilities or ”save time” by standing on a chair instead of digging out that step ladder.
        My point here is that many of the problems like choking or falling can be mitigated by simply slowing down and being more precise in our actions. While doing things slower with the body than the mind might be inclined to do, I think all of us can add a margin of safety, with that one little action, and avoid those emergencies in the first place, especially in an austere or emergency situation.

      2. My wife is a nurse and takes care of severely disabled children in their homes. Wednesday night she was asked to fill in for a nurse that called in sick. The child had a BiPAP and my wife has shied away patients with vents. It paid $30 an hour for a 12 hour shift so she went. The child was a vigorous four year old and the mother was there so it went well.

        She now says she feels confident enough for those cases but will have to attend a certification class to actually be put on those cases.

        1. Daddio7, my daughter is an RN. She has worked in a hospital for awhile now covering gunshots, stabbings, burn unit and other. Its good to have that in the family.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *