What I Did to Prep This Week

What I Did To Prep This Week – Week 39: Apr 7th – Apr 13th 2019

prep week 39

Hello Pack. Hope you all have been enjoying lovely spring weather where you live, it has been completely un-winter like here. We have gotten more outdoor chores done this week than we have from January through March of this year total. We even managed to work in a fun little trail ride on our homesteading survival retreat, as well.

Once some tune-ups are completed on our square baler, it will finally be time to get back to working on my beloved’s old amphibious vehicle again. It has been in two separate parts since before we met about 15 years ago.

Wow, typing that made me grasp how long it has been since I first became so blessed. Anyway, the amphibious has hovered near the front page of our chapter book of a to-do list for a long time, but never fully made it to the top.

woman riding a horse on the homestead

Finding the right engine for it at even an unaffordable price was the challenge my Bobby had for so long. Luckily, a tribe member was willing to donate a golf cart motor to the cause that they say will work perfectly.

Once it is fixed we can ride the creek that runs through our property in any direction and remain under almost total tree cover. A state park fishing lake is 2.2 miles from our homestead.

I know the exact mileage because that is how far my blue heeler Jovie and I rounded up our herd of horses in my SUV after they went walkabout to the lake and were “Facebook Famous” for about and hour. We can ride the creek to the lake for fun now and if we ever ran out of fish or water, to retrieve those two valuable natural resources during a long-term disaster.

I cannot imagine needing either, but a good prepper always has a quality backup plan for their backup plan.

We, meaning the guys in the tribe and one ultra handy gal, worked on the Kubota tractor that had an air filter issue, put a snorkel on the Polaris Ranger, and a tribe member taught some of the 20 somethings how to sharpen and clean a chainsaw – something they thought they knew how to do but apparently their skills needed more honing.

dwarf moringa sprouts

My dwarf Moringa seeds are growing in leaps and bounds. I am astounded at how quickly they are growing. While they continue to thrive I have been doing more research into how to use the “Tree of Life” as both an emergency food source and for medicinal purposes.

Because of the flooding out West, we all better be beefing up our grocery growing activities – or be prepared to dig deeply into our pockets to buy meat, veggies, and milk from the supermarket…where they shelves may be a lot less full than normal.

I took our three youngest grandchildren wild onion hunting with me this week. They are getting very good at being able to distinguish between this foraged delight and just a regular blade of grass or weed.

little girl with basket

Forest school is always in session here on our survival homestead. Actually, next week about 27 homeschool kids from around our county are coming here for the first of a series hands-on farming and general self-reliance workshops. I think I am as excited as the kids about the farm field trips with a purpose.

This Week’s Questions:

  1. What kind of agriculture equipment do you think is most important to have on your homestead now and/or during a SHTF event?
  2. Are you concerned about either high food prices or supply issues this year because of the flooding that harmed so many farmers and ranchers?
  3. What types of edibles do you forage for in the early spring where you live and how do you use them?
  4. What did you do to prep this week?

Tara Dodrill

About Tara Dodrill

Tara Dodrill is a homesteading and survival journalist and author. She lives on a small ranch with her family in Appalachia. She has been both a host and frequent guest on preparedness radio shows. In addition to the publication of her first book, 'Power Grid Down: How to Prepare, Survive, and Thrive after the Lights go Out', Dodrill also travels to offer prepping tips and hands-on training and survival camps and expos.
View all posts by Tara Dodrill →

150 thoughts on “What I Did To Prep This Week – Week 39: Apr 7th – Apr 13th 2019

  1. 1. What kind of agriculture equipment do you think is most important to have on your homestead now and/or during a SHTF event?
    I can only answer for our situation. We need a tractor with implements, lots of hand tools and garden tools, chainsaw, wagons, four-wheeler (We use it a lot.), and coops and barns, if you consider them equipment.
    2. Are you concerned about either high food prices or supply issues this year because of the flooding that harmed so many farmers and ranchers?
    You bet. I’ve enlarged the garden, and I’m planting more.
    3. What types of edibles do you forage for in the early spring where you live and how do you use them?
    I don’t do a lot of foraging. However, I make honeysuckle jelly, and my DIL and I are going to make some products with dandelions. We’ll keep you posted on how they turn out.
    4. What did you do to prep this week?

    This week:
    -We have another grandbaby! That makes six grandkids. Little M was born this week. We got to keep her three siblings while she was in the hospital with Mommy and Daddy. She’s tiny, but healthy.
    -We had quite a scare this week. A neighboring farmer set a “controlled” burn…on a day with winds from 45mph and higher. Needless to say, he wasn’t able to control it. There was so much smoke that it showed up on local radar. The fire headed our way and got within a half mile of our home. After several hours, winds died and rain started. Thank God. The fire is out. It burned fields and trees, but no one was hurt and no homes were damaged. Like the country song states, we found out who our friends are. We were quickly extended offers to help evacuate us, our animals, and personal items. We were also extended offers of places to stay and someone offered to house all of our farm animals. How quickly everything can change.

    *Animals:
    -Sold a buckling to a little girl in 4-H. I gave her a wether, too. I love seeing children learning about animal care.

    *Garden:
    -Planted two more blueberry bushes.
    -Planted 140 strawberry plants. DIL/neighbor planted 60 plants. We should be loaded with berries soon.
    -Planted 24 cabbage plants.
    -Since I was the one who tilled the garden, (See skills.) I made it bigger. I’ve been wanting DH to do it for quite a while, and now it’s done.

    *Added a little to the stockpile: vegetable oil, pasta, flour, trash bags,

    *Miscellaneous:
    -DH is working on improving our 40 acre farm. We have someone wanting to bale the hay. We should have an agreement on payment by next week.

    *Skills:
    -DH had to work late on the day that I needed the garden tilled so that I could get the strawberries in the ground. I called him, got a quick tutorial on how to drive the new tractor and till, and got the job done. That may not be a big deal to some of you, but it was a first for me. We have a breakdown of jobs at home, and the tractor is his. I’m happy to know that I can do it for myself now instead of waiting for/bothering him.

    Be prepared. Stay safe. He’s in charge.

    1. Prepared Grammy,

      Like the country song states, we found out who our friends are. We were quickly extended offers to help evacuate us, our animals, and personal items. We were also extended offers of places to stay and someone offered to house all of our farm animals. How quickly everything can change.

      I think this is just the way a rural community often works, since we all rely on and help each other.

      Sold a buckling to a little girl in 4-H. I gave her a wether, too. I love seeing children learning about animal care.

      When our children were young we did the 4H thing with rabbits and goats, and I agree that it is a great learning experience for youngsters.

      That may not be a big deal to some of you, but it was a first for me. We have a breakdown of jobs at home, and the tractor is his.

      I had to laugh at this one. Two years ago we purchase the ZT mower and the DW hasn’t let me drive it more than a few times.

        1. Prepared Grammy,
          I’m just the opposite. If the DW can operate things, then I can let her do that work LOL. But seriously, with my vision problems, anything we can both do, makes us more secure in a serious event, and lets us worry less about one another.

    2. Congrats on the new grandbaby!!! I bet the child on the 4-H girl’s face warmed your heart – that is such a good program that we support as well. If you are willing, please share your honeysuckle jelly recipe – we have about a 100 wild vines growing on our homestead and I not only love the sight and smell, harvest and preserve some for medicinal purposes and perfume making – would love to add jelly to what we can get from the vines, as well.

  2. What kind of agriculture equipment do you think is most important to have on your homestead now and/or during a SHTF event?

    I would say manual cultivating tools, hoes, rakes, shovels. Well made ones like my grandfather had. Also wheel hoes with attachments.

    Are you concerned about either high food prices or supply issues this year because of the flooding that harmed so many farmers and ranchers? No, Much of our food is imported and the trade war with China has resulted in a surplus of grains here. There will be some profiteering but that is capitalism for you.

    What types of edibles do you forage for in the early spring where you live and how do you use them? I used to forage for black berries and dew berries this time of year but climate change and the loss of bees has resulted in those disappearing in the wild.

    What did you do to prep this week?

    Some how I managed to not complete my home repairs during our short winter so the last bit will have to accomplished with a lot of sweating. My new (old) little tractor has a problem but I think I will just run it until it gets worse so at least I will know where to look. I did get some good equipment but I still have to buy some parts to make a bedder and some weeders.

    I had to put $350 into my brother’s tractor for new batteries and an alternator so I could use it. I used it with his turn plow and box blade to turn and smooth my garden spot.

    It does seem funny that it takes almost as much land to park my equipment as I am cultivating, first world problem I guess. Now I have to build a shelter to park some of it under but I will be prepared and that is the objective.

    I can say that the weather here has been almost perfect for my neighbors potato crop. For the next few weeks until he harvests them I can walk across my yard and into the field and dig some new potatoes to make french fries and potato chips. His packing barn is also by the end of my driveway and at the end of the day when they are digging they leave a few loaded field wagons parked under the barn. I take and fill several five gallon buckets with big ones and store them in a spare bed room.

    1. Daddio7,

      No, Much of our food is imported and the trade war with China has resulted in a surplus of grains here. There will be some profiteering but that is capitalism for you.

      Capitalism also means that shortages from the flooded areas will mean higher prices for my local neighbor farmers. I suspect that many of the affected farmers have insurance of some kind, so the non-producing urban areas will help pick up the tab. It’s about time that farmers start getting the longer end of the stick.

      I used to forage for black berries and dew berries this time of year but climate change and the loss of bees has resulted in those disappearing in the wild.

      We still get berries and have no shortage of bees. I think climate change (if it even exists) gets blamed for many things, like the urbanization of once productive land and habitat destruction, along with the change in Albedo when all of that green changes to black.

      I think I will just run it until it gets worse so at least I will know where to look. I did get some good equipment but I still have to buy some parts to make a bedder and some weeders.

      Unless the machinery is going to tear itself apart or die when you desperately need it, this makes good sense and will definitely narrow down the problem. LOL

      It does seem funny that it takes almost as much land to park my equipment as I am cultivating, first world problem I guess. Now I have to build a shelter to park some of it under but I will be prepared and that is the objective.

      We have two large barns and a machinery shed and are running into the same problems. I think it’s some theorem in physics, that all empty building space will fill itself over time. LOL

      1. The natural law is, “stuff expands to exceed the space allotted to it”! At least at our places, that is sooo true.

        1. Billy T,

          Have you ever seen the clip by George Carlin about “Stuff?” Look it up on YouTube, it’s funny and dead on.

      2. It’s about time that farmers start getting the longer end of the stick. – excellent idea! Not a believer in all the climate change doom and gloom, the changes that have occurred are slight and par for the course with temperature increases etc. over centuries. There are very few things in our grocery store that are imported and are always left until last because no one wants to buy them. No reason oranges and tomatoes should carry a label that reads, “product of Mexico” label when they can be produced in warm climate areas of the United States. On the bees though, colony collapse disorder is real and the bee population has been on the decline since 2004, while a lack of bees has not deterred our cultivated crops or berry bushes, I do worry about the issue not being taken more seriously by the powers that be. Hopefully the recent wins against Monsanto – Bayer over RoundupReady and similar products containing the same chemicals that are harmful to well, about everything, will help deter the bee population decline.

  3. Hi Tara & all,
    The weather here has also been great with only two downsides. I never got to tap my maples and I’m not sure we will get another dip in temperatures to still try AND We already have to start mowing the grass LOL.
    When you state:

    Wow, typing that made me grasp how long it has been since I first became so blessed.

    I have to agree since the DW & I will hit 37 years next week; but, I think I have a few years on you Tara, since I turn 68 today. At this age it just another day not much different than yesterday was or tomorrow will be.

    When you state:

    Once it is fixed we can ride the creek that runs through our property in any direction and remain under almost total tree cover.

    We have the same condition on our creek; but, have no vehicles to do so. In our situation, the creek would travel a long way until it finally hits the Scioto river and then on down to the Ohio and Mississippi. A great canoe trip were I 30-40 years younger, LOL

    a tribe member taught some of the 20 somethings how to sharpen and clean a chainsaw – something they thought they knew how to do but apparently their skills needed more honing.

    This one is not hard; but, with just manual files and a good eye it can take some time. Personally I like the manual files, since you can always hone the edge in the field without carrying anything; but that file and attached guide.

    Because of the flooding out West, we all better be beefing up our grocery growing activities – or be prepared to dig deeply into our pockets to buy meat, veggies, and milk from the supermarket…where they shelves may be a lot less full than normal.

    This is where a deep MAG and a deep larder is imperative. With hundreds of pounds of beef and other meats in the freezers and dairy cows on the property and twi close neighbors who run dairy operations, I think we’re going to be OK here; but, that is also part of this lifestyle.

    It sounds like your field trips to the farm will be a highlight. I remember doing similar things years ago when the kids were younger and everyone enjoyed it.

    And for his Week’s Questions:
    1. What kind of agriculture equipment do you think is most important to have on your homestead now and/or during a SHTF event?
    A rototiller and a chainsaw would be high on the list; but, a good tractor with implements is also a good thing to have. I have several chainsaws; but, perhaps the best long term are the little Ryobi battery electric, since once the fuel is gone, they could still be made to work.
    2. Are you concerned about either high food prices or supply issues this year because of the flooding that harmed so many farmers and ranchers?
    Not at all. We have a very deep larder, a deep MAG, and relatively deep pockets should we really need to purchase a necessity..
    3. What types of edibles do you forage for in the early spring where you live and how do you use them?
    Onions & leeks and the occasional puffball and sometimes cattails or early berries.
    4. What did you do to prep this week?

    This past week we acquired and did the following.
    1. 4 bales of wood shavings (bedding) for the horse, bringing our on hand to 7 ½ bales
    2. Had the appliance repairman in to check the clothes washer that wasn’t spinning or pumping water. Turned out to be just the switch in the lid.
    3. Received 2 more large bales of hay for the horse
    4. Received the SOG Tomahawk from Rural King. Thanks to Almost There for the mention and the link.
    5. Received a Ceramic Gravity Water Filter kit from SHTFandGO. The subject was being discussed on another forum and my search to post what I was using found a great deal and since 2 is one & all.
    6. The DW has completed her probationary training with our local county EMA and was officially sworn in.
    7. I was watching a news show on Fox Business and on the discussion of Climate Change there was a mention of a new study. Since the MSM outlets often take any normally extreme weather such as hurricanes in the Atlantic, Heat in the summer or cold and snow in the winter as evidence for the purported changes, it was refreshing to see that some academics are actually testing some of the long touted claims and at least in one often cited case, the claims were found to be anachronistic and incorrect. ” Climate change and the Syrian civil war revisited” can be founds @ https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0962629816301822
    8. Filed our 2018 income taxes. I miscalculated some of the income & taxes I pulled from IRA’s and we had to pay $225.00 to the Feds & $146.00 to our local School District. Additional withdrawals this upcoming year will take this into account.
    9. Received the Hanging Strawberry Pouch & 10 Bare Root Plants from woot.com. The weather is finally good enough to try setting them up.

    1. TOP,

      My gravity water filter (or as I call it, my pseudo-Berkey) was constructed from a kit I got from SHTFandGo too. In fact, I reported this week I got additional filters for it, also from the same place. It seems to work quite nicely. When I first got the kit, I ordered a second, and built another system for #1 daughter.

      1. Zulu 3-6,

        My gravity water filter (or as I call it, my pseudo-Berkey) was constructed from a kit I got from SHTFandGo too.

        This one is a second spare that was cheap enough to keep on hand (2 is one and all that). I was on another forum and when people asked about filters, a search found this one. I already have the same one I’ve used for some time, that I purchase from Sportsman’s Guide years ago, both of them using the same ”Monolithic” brand ceramic domed filter element.

        In fact, I reported this week I got additional filters for it, also from the same place. It seems to work quite nicely.

        I saw that and it does work well if a little slow. I’m also playing with a version using a gamma seal lid and a Schrader valve to force the water through under pressure, and speed up the process. Running more than one of these in gravity mode provides more potable water then we will need; but, the pressurized version is something Sirius and I thought about based on a post on the other site we used to all frequent. If you recall it was a very expensive stainless version that did both gravity drip & pressurized, and the idea was not mine; but, the cheap (frugal?) version was

        When I first got the kit, I ordered a second, and built another system for #1 daughter.

        We have two and parts for two more, with one of the kits from the NRA, based on someone else’s mention. I could not get the DD to take one; but, she does have some filter bottles & straws as do the boys.

        1. Question about gravity water filters like the Berkey or Alexapure – are the filters interchangeable? Would I be able to use a Berkey filter in an Alexapure?

          Thanks!

          1. GA Red,

            Question about gravity water filters like the Berkey or Alexapure – are the filters interchangeable? Would I be able to use a Berkey filter in an Alexapure?

            Since I own neither filter system, I’m not sure; but, the filter elements are interchangeable for most of those on the market when constructing your own DIY system from food grade buckets. For the buckets, you just have to match the mounting holes; but, for the systems, some filters may be too large or long to fit in the available space.
            Here is the filter Zulu and I purchased.
            Gravity Water Filter Kit for DIY Purifier, Includes .2 Micron Ceramic Filter, Pre Filter, Dispenser, and Instructions by SHTFandGO
            https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00XTJJIF2/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o01_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

            Here is a video on the DIY construction.
            The only difference is I used round buckets,
            Gravity Water Filter

          2. TOP and GA Red,

            I got the Schrader valves I ordered. They came in pairs, so I’m going to put one on #1 daughter’s filter too. I bought a small bicycle pump (the kind you can mount on your bike) that should be more than adequate to put two or three PSI into the top bucket. https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B079S6T56C/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o04_s01?ie=UTF8&psc=1

            Haven’t tried it on anything yet, but it seems well constructed for $11.00. I’m planning on mounting the Schrader valve on my filter later today.

            For GA Red, TOP tipped me to slightly pressuring the top bucket of our DIY gravity filters so water will flow a little faster through the system. Using a Schrader valve (the valve stem on a tire) and a small hand pump and viola! I hope. 🙂

      1. Tara,

        Happy birthday and happy upcoming anniversary!!

        Thanks. For the next three weeks, the DW & I are the same age as we were when we married. As for the birthday, at this age you cannot tell it from any other day.

  4. Puppy got a new ball gun. The old one broke and I threw it in the trash. He looked at me like no, that’s my favorite toy…..LOL I asked him where is your ball gun and he would walk over and look in the trash can. He’s so smart…..

    Garden
    Planted gold and red potatoes, romaine, salad blend and green leaf lettuce, yellow onions and bush beans.
    Bought a lemon tree and planter bucket.
    Pear trees are absolutely covered in pears…..I definitely got a pear…LOL

    Food
    Made 4 lbs of beef jerky….2lb hot, 1 medium, 1 plain.

    Security
    Bought a doorbell cam.
    Bought a dash cam.
    Bought newer style cameras that are WiFi capable and have solar charging panels.

    Repairs
    Fixed the roof on the shed or should I say flexed it……LOL Flex seal……

    Vehicle
    Washed pollen off the Jeep, with all the flooding, I should get the snorkel set up.

    Yard work
    Cut the grass and weeds.
    Bought a new attachment for the RYOBI a 18″ trimmer. Now I have 3 trimmers, gas,battery and electrical.

    Interesting video

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=GW24LLUHSIQ

    Interesting article

    http://allnewspipeline.com/In_Study_Garlic_Kills_ALL_Cancers.php

    Tara’s questions:
    1. What kind of agriculture equipment do you think is most important to have on your homestead now and/or during a SHTF event?
    2. Are you concerned about either high food prices or supply issues this year because of the flooding that harmed so many farmers and ranchers?
    3. What types of edibles do you forage for in the early spring where you live and how do you use them?

    1. Everything you can get your hands on, however it will come down to electrical and then manual labor.
    2. Most definitely, I’m storing more food. Dehydrating, freeze drying and canning.
    3. A little later….blackberries…..

    Thor’s questions:

    1. How fast could you bugout if you are forced to evacuate? Would you be safe?
    2. How many different kinds of water filter systems do you have?
    3. Do you have a seed stockpile?
    4. Do you have a NOAA weather alert radio?
    5. What do you think of Trump busing illegal aliens to sanctuary cities?

    1. 1. We almost had to bugout this week. Thankfully, we didn’t. It made me realize that we need a better plan.
      2. I have three for the house and two for the camper.
      3. Yes, I do. I also save seeds.
      4. I have three. Two in the house (One can be powered with the hand crank.) and one in the camper.
      5. Then they take a bus to anywhere they wish to go. No, thanks.

        1. Prepared Grammy,

          Our local alert sends out such ridiculous things that I haven’t added it yet.

          The good NOAA radios allow you to select the counties of interest and the types of alerts. Taking time to understand the radio setup and getting it right can be useful without being annoying.

          I can’t believe that I forgot about the Lifestraws.

          I can, because the better prepared we are, the less likely we are to remember every detail like our lives relied on it.
          IMHO this is a good thing and allows you to relax a bit.

    2. Thor1,

      I’m going to have to check with the Ex on that report Cuba is setting up rodent farms for food. I wouldn’t be surprised if that was actually old news. I know she told me she had to eat all sorts of weird stuff when a little girl. That or go hungry.

    3. Thor1,

      Interesting video

      There’s nothing really new here, since this is all documented in John Casey’s ”Dark Winter: How the Sun Is Causing a 30-Year Cold Spell” and numerous other observations. Thos who look at the weather and climate records without an agenda will see the ebb and flow of changes that are natural phenomenon.

      Interesting article

      The article makes some interesting assertions about WiFi from cell towers, although WiFi is not used on those towers, telling me the author is ignorant of the fats, the physics, and the medical trials; but, like so many people, needs to keep the rumors alive so he continues to get website traffic.

      Your questions:
      1. How fast could you bugout if you are forced to evacuate? Would you be safe?
      5-10 minutes or less and safety would depend on the reason. In any case, our vehicles are never parked with less than a half tank of fuel.
      2. How many different kinds of water filter systems do you have?
      More than 10 depending on how you count them. 2 gravity drip bucket systems, 1 pressurized bucket system, the reverse osmosis system and a handful of filter straws.
      3. Do you have a seed stockpile?
      Absolutely. Packages collected from over the years and several of the survival seed cans.
      4. Do you have a NOAA weather alert radio?
      We have more than one; plus, the ability to monitor local NOAA weather radar and talk directly to our local NOAA NWS office.
      5. What do you think of Trump busing illegal aliens to sanctuary cities?
      I think it’s brilliant as was Mitch McConnell’s bringing up a vote on the Green New Deal. Interesting how these hypocrites fold like a cheap tent when you call their bluff.

    4. there isn’t any way i would bug out, any scenario would be a very short term situation of only a few hours (like a tornado, which is incredibly rare to start with, i would just leave to wait in a neighbors cellar, until i get my own cellar which is on the to do list this year) not much else to leave for, and its already in the middle of nowhere on a road with no close neighbors, i could drop a couple trees in the road half a mile away and if it was one of those shtf situations it would stay barricaded until it was no longer shtf (they barelly plow this road in winter and few people use this road except some farmers, or people comming to see me)

      no idea, i got one or 2 life straws but i don’t think much of them, gimmicky junk as far as i am concerned, but they were cheap, i got 2 hand powered ceramic filters ($80 price range when i got them years ago, hiking stuff), and i have a berkey, though the water from my artesian well is good already. could always boil water too.

      yes and no, i have enough seed to plant 2or 3 years in advance as i save seed and i go around in the fall buying up left overs (went to one store 3 years ago and got 10 gallons worth of blue lake and contender beans combined, 2 gllons of flint corn, and lots of peas, squash, turnips, beets, cabbage etc, enough to plant 12 acres or more, all for $20, divided up they will last for years, and i only plant what can’t cross, like alternating one year contender beans, and the next blue lake, letting lots dry in the pods, shelling them and saving seed, makes good dry beans too, leather britches, and canned or pickled beans, plus all the fresh ones i use or sell/trade)

      nope, i had one years ago but i never took it out of the box, i have a regular am/fm radio and the batteries last for years (4 AA batteries) since its rare if ever that i use it.

      heard nothing about it

    5. 1. How fast could you bugout if you are forced to evacuate? Would you be safe? Based on what I keep in my car, all I’d need to do is grab one box and all the pill bottles by the bed (mostly vitamins). The DH would be grabbing “safety” supplies. More than likely, we could be out of the house in under 30 minutes depending on whether we needed to take the fur butts with us.
      2. How many different kinds of water filter systems do you have? At least 2, plus a notebook with instructions on how to make one.
      3. Do you have a seed stockpile? Sorta – if you call buying seeds and never using them all a stockpile. I do have some survival seed vault canisters too.
      4. Do you have a NOAA weather alert radio? Yes – have had several over the years – most made by Oregon Scientific. The DH also has his Ham radio and several web links on his phone. He was watching them last night after the power went out during a storm late yesterday.
      5. What do you think of Trump busing illegal aliens to sanctuary cities? LOVE it and think they deserve what they wished for.

  5. This Week’s Questions:

    1. What kind of agriculture equipment do you think is most important to have on your homestead now and/or during a SHTF event? For a yard our size it’s my Craftsman gas weedeater with a cultivator attachment.
    2. Are you concerned about either high food prices or supply issues this year because of the flooding that harmed so many farmers and ranchers? Prices are bound to go up, just a fuel is right now. As Scripture warns us – we will have difficult days (the beginning for sorrows) which is BEFORE we enter that actual last times; that’s why we prep.
    3. What types of edibles do you forage for in the early spring where you live and how do you use them? Nothing I am aware of locally yet.

    4. What did you do to prep this week?

    Gun show last weekend. Did pretty well. With the car repairs the last 2 weeks and the upcoming house repair, money was looking a bit tight. It’s much better now. Found a nice set of target grips for a S&W that needed them, and a “like new” holster for my Glock ($15 vs. $105 for a new one!). Sold two guns, scope, and some misc. stuff and only spent $40!

    Got a deal on a new Rock Island 1911A1 in 45 ACP and a 12-gauge pump. Can never have enough of those.

    Had to take the youngest fur baby to the vet. Estimate for her dental work was $600-1000. Things were not as bad as we though. Total bill was $360!

    More repairs on DW’s car; rear sway bars which were noted during our last oil change. Can’t complain about the cost or the need, just the timing.

    I have a HP452dn Color Duplex Laser printer. I do a lot of printing to put into binders. I just added a 3rd tray to hold 550 sheets of (prepunched) paper. Much more convenient for us, but boy is it tall now. Another long-term prep checked off.

    Received: Eye glass side shields, grips, holster, DVD, 550-sheet paper feeder for printer, AR15 foregrip,

    1. JP,

      We have a HP452dn Color Duplex Laser printer. I do a lot of printing to put into binders.

      We have the Brother MFC 7820N monochrome laser & the Brother Multifunction color laser in the same family. The color unit can be used wired or wireless; but, like most of our equipment, we use wired, mostly for security. I started with dot matrix back in the late 1970’s and then the color ink jet machines into the 1990’s. Back then laser printer, let alone multifunction color were pipe dreams; but, here we are, able to print reams of color without a thought. With that new paper tray and duplex printing, we can now print high quality books as our own publisher, just in time for paper books to be nearly obsolete. LOL.

      1. TOP

        I’ve had a laser printer since 1990. My first was an Okidata. At one point I bought a new circuit board for more fonts instead of a second paper try (big mistake as software changed and gave me the fonts I wanted). When it died (non-ecomomically repairable) I went to Office Depot and they had a NIB HP duplex on markdown as the new models were out, but it was B&W and multi-function; currently in DW’s office. I got my “new” one the same way, but I wanted color and duplex vs. having a scanner built in.

        Toner can be expensive, about $100 for 4 colors/$28 for a large black, and I go through a set of color and 2 black ones a year. But it sure do like the quality. No more soggy pages from an ink jet. We also have binding equipment for making book(let)s if we want.

        1. JP,

          I’ve had a laser printer since 1990. My first was an Okidata. At one point I bought a new circuit board for more fonts instead of a second paper try (big mistake as software changed and gave me the fonts I wanted).

          One of my early dot matrix printers was an OKI Data; but, my first laser printer was a used Xerox from a Hamfest back in the 1990’s that I had forgotten about until this thread.
          I have an old High School friend who worked for Xerox who was with me @ Hamvention back in the mid 1990’s and assured me that this boat anchor was still a good printer and it was and worked for a long time. The problem was that it was twice the size of my current color printer and about 5 times the weight; but, it did come with about 8 or 10 “Font Cartridges” and was supported by some of the old Windows Versions. My Brother monochrome laser was purchased in the early 2000’s and the Color Duplex Laser just a few years ago, on sale for $250.00. I found the toner cartridges (CMYK set) for $75.00 online and we’ve been very happy with it. It can Scan, Fax, Copy, and perform color Duplex printing, wired or wireless, with setup via a web interface. As I said we use wired for everything except tablets & cell phones on premise, since it’s just a more secure way to operate, and wireless, even with the best WPA encryption can still be broken with persistence and today’s horsepower. In our case that would mean someone conspicuously parked in the driveway for a long time, since the closest road is well traveled and out of range of my WiFi signals. For those of us working with computers for a long time (in my case more than 50 years) the transition has been wondrous and almost unimaginable. I have used machines no one has ever heard of in high school and college (IBM-1130 or Autonetics Recomp II anyone?) Then came the COSMIC Elf, some CPM S-100 bus machines and Motorola VME bus,, followed by a succession of various TRS-80’s. No Commodore 64 or Commodore PET or what we called ”Commode Door” computing here however. In the 1980’s I built an Apple II and an IBM OC from scratch, staring with a bare board, populating components and soldering them in place. I had an aftermarket Apple floppy system I purchased; but, the first hard drive to the PC was a full high, 5 inch, 5 MB MFM drive I purchased used for $100.00 and got a bargain. I could print with that thing to a dot matrix printer that I got from a dealer friend for more than I paid for my color laser (and that was 1980 dollars).
          Now a USB 2 TB drive only runs about $50-70. We live in amazing times, LOL.

          Toner can be expensive, about $100 for 4 colors/$28 for a large black, and I go through a set of color and 2 black ones a year. But it sure do like the quality. No more soggy pages from an ink jet. We also have binding equipment for making book(let)s if we want.

          My toner cartridges were $75.00 for the color machine and only about $50.00 for the monochrome and we print accordingly.
          I used to have a Punch & Binder and made a lot of those books / booklets; but, find 3 ring hole punching and full binders or the little once the kids use, to be sufficient for our needs.

  6. I did my low-carb grocery shopping this week. Added a little to my stash. Cooked my weekly meals. Ordered and received four more freeze-dried food pouches.

    Granddaughter was a joy this week even though I only had her for two days. On Monday, she came to me, a very serious expression on her face, and asked, “Do I have bones?” I told her of course she did and started pointing out different bones to her. Then I got the idea to pull out one of my anatomy books that has detailed colored plates, photos, and x-rays/CAT/MRI screen shots.

    She sat in my lap, absolutely mesmerized. I showed her a skeleton plate and pointed out bones on the picture, then showed her where they were on her body. She was also very intrigued by the pictures and such of the heart and was flipping through the book looking at all sorts of stuff. We spent over 30-minutes doing this and would have gone longer if we didn’t have to get ready for her daddy picking her up. I don’t know exactly what prompted her initial question, probably something on the boob tube, but I was very happy to help her out and very happy to see her positive reaction. #1 daughter was ecstatic when I told her about the question her daughter had asked and her reaction to my teaching.

    Granddaughter received the cute little shoes Bam Bam had posted the link for a few weeks ago. She loves them and refuses to take them off even at bedtime. It takes a little persuading on mom and dad’s part for her to give them up without a full-blown meltdown. However, on Friday she gave me no guff at all at nap time and took them right off. Of course, they went right back on when she woke up. 😊 So, thanks Bam Bam for a great tip!

    Also ordered a pink ceramic piggy bank for granddaughter. It also comes personalized. She’ll love it, especially when she gets to load it up with some coins I have for her too.

    Got all of the stuff I needed for my manual clothes washing thingy. Just need to mount the Gamma lids this weekend, drill a couple of holes, and I’ll be good to go. I’ll be doing a test run as well.

    I also ordered and received four extra filters and a faucet assembly for my DIY pseudo-Berkey water purifier. I don’t plan to build a second one, just have spare parts.

    With hurricane season approaching, I ordered a pair of heavy leather work gloves and a roll of 6-mil black plastic sheeting. The sheeting has a dual use, covering any windows that may get broken in a storm, or for covering those windows for blackout purposes in a SHTF situation.

    Cooked up a batch of elderberry syrup (Bam-Bam’s recipe). Couldn’t find my small funnel to fill the bottles, so I had to use an even smaller funnel that was kind of tricky to use. Got seven 4oz bottles filled up.

    Tara’s Questions:

    #1 – Agriculture equipment? I have none and probably won’t have any due to lack of a place to farm or garden.

    #2 – Concerned about high food prices/short supply? A little bit. I’m not as concerned about prices as supply. I have been adding more to my freeze-dried food supply recently.

    #3 – What type of edibles available? None, really. I suppose if things got really desperate, I could plink some squirrels. About four million of them live in the thicket of trees behind my apartment building. Give or take a million. 😊

    Thor1’s Questions:

    #1 – How fast could I bugout if necessary? Would I be safe? Depending on the event, I could be out of here with the bare necessities within 15-minutes. I would need transportation though as I would not be able to walk far carrying a BOB. I do keep my SUV at 75% fuel level or higher which is more than enough to get to my Ex’s house. Safe? Depends on the event, where I need to go, and how I have to get there. If my building were on fire, I could get out faster, with less. I do have a ladder I can attach to my bedroom window sill, if necessary.

    #2 – How many different water filter systems do I have? Several. I have a DIY pseudo-Berkey system (with spare filters), a couple of different kinds of filter straws and such, plus purification tablets, good old cheese cloth to strain, plus bleach, and or boiling.

    #3 – Seed stockpile? Nope. Nary a one.

    #4 – Do I have a NOAA weather radio? Yes, three of them. One for my BOB, one in my HAM radio bag, a third for use around the crib.

    #5 – What do I think of Trump busing illegal aliens to sanctuary cities? Well, I’d much prefer they were just trooped to the Mexican border and forced across at bayonet point (if necessary). The mere suggestion of sending illegals to the sanctuary cities has already upset the libs and socialists, which only proves their true feelings on the matter. The thought of a bunch of illegals being dropped off in front of Nancy Pelosi’s district office in San Francisco does have a certain appeal to me.

    1. Zulu 3-6,

      She sat in my lap, absolutely mesmerized. I showed her a skeleton plate and pointed out bones on the picture, then showed her where they were on her body. She was also very intrigued by the pictures and such of the heart and was flipping through the book looking at all sorts of stuff.

      She sounds more & more like my DD at that age, so I will recommend a magazine subscription you should check out that my little one loved. ”Zoobooks” each of which has a theme from the animal kingdom. Primates for instance would include monkeys, chimps, Bonobos, Gorillas, etc. with lots of photos; but, the one my DD always turned to first were the stripped down pages, where they showed the animal, followed by the same photos with the skin or fur removed, and then another photo of the skeleture, and then into the body for the organs, like peeling an onion. My DW was a bit squeamish at the time, so my DD would often show her the page with the fur removed to show the raw musculature, which always got an “eeeek” from her mom. We have copies with everything from Elephants to Ants & Termites, with the later showing the inside of the mound and the tunnels. This one has a velar remembrance in my brain, since when it arrived I recalled seeing some ant mounds on the property, and we went out to investigate with a shovel to compare the book with the real thing. It was a nice summer day and I stepped the shovel into the mound and flipped the clump of dirt, not paying attention that I was wearing flip flops until I felt those tiny bites on my bare feet. She looked at the internal of the mound compared to the book; but, giggled at me the rest of the day.

      I also ordered and received four extra filters and a faucet assembly for my DIY pseudo-Berkey water purifier. I don’t plan to build a second one, just have spare parts.

      I have several including one I have nearly perfected that runs faster than the simple gravity filter. I used a gamma lid and a Schrader valve so I can pressurize the top bucket instead of relying on just gravity.

      Cooked up a batch of elderberry syrup (Bam-Bam’s recipe).

      Where did you get your elderberries or do I just have to cough up the cash and pay the current high prices?

      1. TOP,

        I already subscribe granddaughter to “Zoobies” from the same publisher, a booklet for younger kids. When she gets older, I’ll subscribe her to “Zoobooks.” She does enjoy the Zoobies.

        I got my elderberries from Amazon. Frontier brand. They were $21.00/lb a couple of weeks ago, which is a lot cheaper than they were last year when they were about $50.00/lb. I just checked and Amazon has them for $20.97/lb today.

        I just ordered a Schrader valve to put on my pseudo-Berkey. I already have a Gamma lid on the top bucket for ease of re-filling. Where do you mount the valve? In the center was my thought. Also, how much air pressure? I figure just a few PSI will do as the lid is liable to pop off with much more.

        1. Zulu 3-6,

          I already subscribe granddaughter to “Zoobies” from the same publisher, a booklet for younger kids. When she gets older, I’ll subscribe her to “Zoobooks.”

          That’s great. They didn’t have the “Zoobies” back then (25ish years ago). Another you might consider in a few years is Kids Discover” magazine. This has another story. She got kids Discover from about age 7-8 until about 10-11 while we got the “Discovery”. One day she came out of our reading room (the one with the toilet) and announced that our magazine was way better than hers, at which point we stopped renewing it. It sounds like you could well be on that same track. Since she’s your GD you have already been through raising kids and probably know this; but, I’ll add one more suggestion we always used. When she gets to the “Why” stage and continues to ask persistent questions, never shut her down; but, explain the answers to as deep as she can follow. At this age, when they have endless curiosity, you should feed it as much as possible and watch it grow.

          I got my elderberries from Amazon. Frontier brand. They were $21.00/lb a couple of weeks ago, which is a lot cheaper than they were last year when they were about $50.00/lb. I just checked and Amazon has them for $20.97/lb today.

          Thanks, I’ll look. While I could afford it, I just wasn’t ready to pay that $50.00 last year.

          I just ordered a Schrader valve to put on my pseudo-Berkey. I already have a Gamma lid on the top bucket for ease of re-filling. Where do you mount the valve? In the center was my thought. Also, how much air pressure? I figure just a few PSI will do as the lid is liable to pop off with much more.

          Mounting depends on the valve mount threads which in my case didn’t work well in the center due to thickness of the plastic. Anywhere you can get a good mount & seal should work. As for pressure, just a few PSI over ambient makes it run a bit faster. I have a Ryobi inflator / deflator; but, plan to get one of those little syringe style air pumps you use on footballs & basketballs and I suspect a few pumps will speed things up nicely.

        2. Zulu 3-6,

          I got my elderberries from Amazon. Frontier brand. They were $21.00/lb a couple of weeks ago, which is a lot cheaper than they were last year when they were about $50.00/lb. I just checked and Amazon has them for $20.97/lb today.

          I just ordered 2 lbs @ $19.74 each with free prime shipping.. They should be here on Tuesday.
          Now I just have to dig up the syrup recipe or perhaps email Bam Bam for it.
          This group rocks!!!!

          1. TOP,

            I’m liking these price drops on elderberries. I think I may need to order a couple more pounds and stick ’em in the fridge for later.

          2. TOP,

            Are you sure it wasn’t 1 lb for $19.74. I’ve not seen elderberries in any quantity more than 1 lb. And even on Frontiers website, they only have 1 lb bags.

          3. Almost There,

            Are you sure it wasn’t 1 lb for $19.74. I’ve not seen elderberries in any quantity more than 1 lb. And even on Frontiers website, they only have 1 lb bags.

            I ordered 2 1-pound bags as I clumsily stated.

            I just ordered 2 lbs @ $19.74 each with free prime shipping.. They should be here on Tuesday.

            I also used smile.amazon.com so the neighbors who run an animal sanctuary get a little spiff.

  7. Good afternoon gang. With the decent weather (and no real humidity yet), I was able to accomplish a lot. Built another raised bed, and have it all ready to plant after Good Friday. The pollen is almost gone thank goodness! Tired of everything covered in yellow!

    I had a very weird ordeal on Wednesday morning. About 1:20am, I am awaken by someone banging on my storm door and yelling for me to come to the door (yeah, like that’s going to happen). Grabbed my Glock and jacked in a shell, peeped out the window and entire yard was illuminated A cop telling me to open the door now. I decided it was best to not open the door with gun in hand. Turned on light, opened door and He wants varification of my address. (I wanted to point him to my mailbox, but kept the sarcasm in thought only). Noticed two other cops also on the sidelines. The cop said they had a report of people fighting at my location. Really? I explained the only thing going on at this was ‘sleep.’ As it turned out, the dispatcher had sent them to the wrong address, and he didn’t even apologize for scaring the crap out of me.
    A good prepping lesson here: Use caution, carry a big Ole Glock, but don’t be stupid enough to have in hand when you know for sure they are law officers trying to do their job. At best have you weapon close at hand, and apply patience and a calmness in the situation. Next day, I checked with a friend (in law enforcement – county policeman), andhesays this happens more often that we hear as dispatcher can’t always get the callers address andso the call address is then based on GPS coordinates where call was made. D_ _m!

    1. At the very least, would want my manual hand tools. A tiller and chainsaw would also be. Sweet. No room for a small utility vehicle or tractor, but would love. To learn how to operate both. I used to help my dad till the garden with his old International Harvester tractor and even learned how to use the discs.
    2. I think we would be ok with the majority of items, but as someone else mentioned, there might be issues in quantities available at any given time.
    3. Never foraged for foods in early spring. Need to learn more!

    Regarding Thor’s questions:
    1. Truthfully, it would take me a little more than 30 min to bug out, but think I could be headed out definitely within an hour. Both cars always filled, BOB in both cars and other useful and needed items just by the door waiting to go atamo nets notice. I think smart people should do dry runs on this item. Why wait until a fire to check the batteries in the smoke alarm?
    2. None – I need to fix this gap.
    3. I do have some (seed stashes), but slowing adding more.
    4. One NOLA radio (battery operated)
    5. Sorry, but a dumb move – Ship them back to the border and send them away. He just said the other day, we are at capacity and can’t take any more due to our resources. Do you know that the number of illigels crossing the boarder has doubled since this time a year ago. We need that wall.

    Worked myself hard this week getting the garden ready to plant. Hummingbirds have arrived at my feeder!

    1. And another lesson from your nighttime ordeal: Be prepared to take care of yourself. Law enforcement may show up at the wrong address.

      1. Prepared Grammy,

        And another lesson from your nighttime ordeal: Be prepared to take care of yourself. Law enforcement may show up at the wrong address.

        This is especially a problem if you really need help and they end up across town. In our firearms training we tell people that while 911 can be an important resource, ”when seconds count, help could be only minutes away”. Nuff said,

    2. Jean,

      Grabbed my Glock and jacked in a shell, peeped out the window and entire yard was illuminated A cop telling me to open the door now. I decided it was best to not open the door with gun in hand. Turned on light, opened door and He wants varification of my address.

      That has happened here a few times when the lines got wet and called in a false 911. After dark I always go to the door with gun & holster on belt (as it is now typing this), a flashlight, and my ID.

      I wanted to point him to my mailbox, but kept the sarcasm in thought only). Noticed two other cops also on the sidelines.

      ROTFLMAO!!!! I understand both the thought and the caution.

      At best have you weapon close at hand, and apply patience and a calmness in the situation.

      A sidearm is always with me, often even when sleeping, when I fall asleep in the recliner watching TV.

      Next day, I checked with a friend (in law enforcement – county policeman), and he says this happens more often that we hear as dispatcher can’t always get the callers address and so the call address is then based on GPS coordinates where call was made. D_ _m!

      This is only one of the downsides of dropping the landline. We still have ours since it will work long after you get no bars, and is hard to jam with buried wiring. Also, in our county, you can register your telephones with the local county Sheriff’s Office. This gives them exact coordinates and address for 911 AND they will send you push messages as email or text of county happenings, like weather alerts, road closings, etc. The system is called ”Nixle” (http://www.nixle.com/)

      And if you ever ran a tractor it will come back quickly; but, a skid loader may take more time, unless you’re running a ZT mower.

    3. “Ship them back to the border and send them away. He just said the other day, we are at capacity and can’t take any more due to our resources.”

      Quite the contrary. Maine is the oldest state in the nation. We don’t have enough workers to support our seasonal tourism businesses, never mind support our existing year-round manufacturing and service and agricultural businesses. We need to bring them in from somewhere. We have a serious labor crunch — as do many of the businesses and farms in “Trump Country” — farms and food processing most notably. And, for those of us “of a certain age” who are collecting or about to collect Social Security– the age funnel is growing narrower, so there aren’t enough native workers to support us. (Current workers pay in to our SocSec — it’s not like we banked the money for all those years, we paid for those behind us). So, we had better wake up and welcome incoming workers, or watch our businesses and industries and our social safety nets implode. Besides which, how many of you would pick up and move to pick strawberries or apples? Though so. So how do you think those apples and strawberries end up in your kitchen? Screw the damn wall. We need those people.

      1. Contrarian,

        Quite the contrary. Maine is the oldest state in the nation.

        I’m not sure which nation you mean; but, if you mean the United States of America, you are way off base, since Maine comes in @ the middle of the pack in 23rd place well behind my native state of Pennsylvania (2nd) and my adopted state of Ohio (17th) per the following list.
        1. Delaware Dec. 7, 1787 1638
        2. Pennsylvania Dec. 12, 1787 1682
        3. New Jersey Dec. 18, 1787 1660
        4. Georgia Jan. 2, 1788 1733
        5. Connecticut Jan. 9, 1788 1634
        6. Massachusetts Feb. 6, 1788 1620
        7. Maryland Apr. 28, 1788 1634
        8. South Carolina May 23, 1788 1670
        9. New Hampshire June 21, 1788 1623
        10. Virginia June 25, 1788 1607
        11. New York July 26, 1788 1614
        12. North Carolina Nov. 21, 1789 1660
        13. Rhode Island May 29, 1790 1636
        14. Vermont Mar. 4, 1791 1724
        15. Kentucky June 1, 1792
        16. Tennessee June 1, 1796
        17. Ohio Mar. 1, 1803
        18. Louisiana Apr. 30, 1812
        19. Indiana Dec. 11, 1816
        20. Mississippi Dec. 10, 1817
        21. Illinois Dec. 3, 1818
        22. Alabama Dec. 14, 1819
        23. Maine Mar. 15, 1820
        24. Missouri Aug. 10, 1821
        25. Arkansas June 15, 1836
        26. Michigan Jan. 26, 1837
        27. Florida Mar. 3, 1845
        28. Texas Dec. 29, 1845
        29. Iowa Dec. 28, 1846
        30. Wisconsin May 29, 1848
        31. California Sept. 9, 1850
        32. Minnesota May 11, 1858
        33. Oregon Feb. 14, 1859
        34. Kansas Jan. 29, 1861
        35. West Virginia June 20, 1863
        36. Nevada Oct. 31, 1864
        37. Nebraska Mar. 1, 1867
        38. Colorado Aug. 1, 1876
        39. North Dakota Nov. 2, 1889
        40. South Dakota Nov. 2, 1889
        41. Montana Nov. 8, 1889
        42. Washington Nov. 11, 1889
        43. Idaho July 3, 1890
        44. Wyoming July 10, 1890
        45. Utah Jan. 4, 1896
        46. Oklahoma Nov. 16, 1907
        47. New Mexico Jan. 6, 1912
        48. Arizona Feb. 14, 1912
        49. Alaska Jan. 3, 1959
        50. Hawaii Aug. 21, 1959

        I love these little educational interludes, since they also refresh my own memory.

        We don’t have enough workers to support our seasonal tourism businesses, never mind support our existing year-round manufacturing and service and agricultural businesses.

        You mean your businesses are not willing to pay the wages required to get workers to stay and work, and need those off the books $2.00 per hour cash workers who are not paying into our tax and social security systems. For those illegal immigrants (undocumented workers?) who are on the books, whose SS # are they using, and how is that screwing up the people whose numbers are being fraudulently used?

        We need to bring them in from somewhere. We have a serious labor crunch — as do many of the businesses and farms in “Trump Country” — farms and food processing most notably.

        Here in Ohio, one of the unrecognized breadbaskets of the country, these off the books, low wage, and non citizen workers are killing family farms of our local citizen farmers. I know personally of two family run dairy operations of friends who are getting killed by corporate mega-dairy operations, who are only in business because they use this cheap, ”exploitable” labor to line their wallets.

        And, for those of us “of a certain age” who are collecting or about to collect Social Security– the age funnel is growing narrower, so there aren’t enough native workers to support us. (Current workers pay in to our SocSec — it’s not like we banked the money for all those years, we paid for those behind us).

        The DW & I are currently collecting and this is a big problem that congress on either side of the aisle has failed to correct. While SS does make up about 50% of our current retirement income, we still bank (as in savings) quite a lot of that each month and could survive should SS be reduced or cut off. Immigrant workers however are not going to be filling the void that congress has purposely overlooked and ignored all of these years, so we each must plan to do without. OTOH, the reduction in taxes and regulations now has the economy on fire, and with more companies stressing non-college educated, skilled trade jobs with training, I think long term we will do OK.

        So, we had better wake up and welcome incoming workers, or watch our businesses and industries and our social safety nets implode.

        We (the USA) have always welcomed incoming workers who come here via the legal means, and if congress would get their act together instead of just “resisting”, we could streamline the process for guest worker VISA’s and bring in the needed workers, who should be paid a decent wage. The downside, especially for the city folks, will be that they will have to pay higher (fair) prices for their produce, milk, and meat; but, the other upside is that my neighbor farmers may actually start making a decent living, beyond the sub minimum wage many now make.

        Besides which, how many of you would pick up and move to pick strawberries or apples?

        I have done those jobs picking fruits and berries; but, @ 68 I’ll only be doing them small scale from my own berry patch and fruit trees. As for moving for work, I didn’t have to move much, since I had skills that were needed full time by numerous companies, and I was not stuck with just low skilled seasonal labor.

        So how do you think those apples and strawberries end up in your kitchen? Screw the damn wall. We need those people.

        I know exactly how they get from farm to kitchen, since I live in farm country surrounded by hard working family farms. We could screw the wall and let in everyone; but, that I assume means you think ”exploiting” poor, uneducated immigrants is a good thing, as long as you get your cheap food. Personally, I do not. That also presumes that you think trafficking people and drugs are also OK and perhaps that Mara Salvatrucha (MS-13) is just another boy band with franchises in most large cities in the country.
        Of course you erroneously thought that Maine was first in the Union, so perhaps you should take a moment to do some research and ”think” things through.

        1. i heard from a few business owners who refused to hire illegals. they lack customers and sales because everyone goes to the competator who has lower prices because of their illegal workers. which either causes the legal business to capitulate and go under, struggle to survive, or be forced to also hire illegals to stay in business.

          1. Thor1,

            TOP, did someone change their name again?
            Hint, Rebecca, Mainebrain…..???

            We had a similar thought, LOL.
            You can run or change your name; but, you still can’t hide.

      2. i looked into maine over the past year, getting fet up with nys bs. from what i heard land is cheap in aristook and penobscot. lots of farms going under, and all the sawmills are closing up. not because of lack of workers, they are being out competed. similar to how farms in ny are dying out. dairy farmers here are getting 2 or 3 cents per gallon for milk, maybe 10 if certified organic (and much more costly to produce and stay certified). a lot of farmers here have gone bancrupt, no idea who makes money on the milk when its in the store $6 a gallon, but its not the farmers. i heard maines potato farms are similarly getting screwed under. of coure in ny its also a lot of bloated regulation thats killing the farms too.

        1. I guess every state is different. In north Florida TG Lee milk is $3.79 a gal. I live next to a potato field (it was mine until I lost it in 1992.) The farmer also got 13 acres behind me and built a nice home there. I see the field full of shiny new green tractors when he is cultiviting, I think he is doing OK but he still complains about low prices. We talk and I know how the potato market is doing. Last year northern farmers had a short crop with poor quality. Prices (about $20 a hundred weight) for new Florida potatoes are higher than they have been in two decades. This is for potatoes used for potato chips, not just any potato can be used for them. Most potatoes here are contracted for a set price ($14 this year) and if the farmer can fill his contract he will earn a decent profit. This year the weather was perfect and they expect a bumper crop.

          Any over the contracted amount can be sold on the open market. Some farmers here will make $millions. That is because some farmers grow a type of potato that is used for the table market to be sold in grocery stores. They do no forward contract these and can sell to whomever they want. This type also makes decent chips and chip makers will gladly buy them if there is a shortage.

          1. Daddio7,

            I guess every state is different. In north Florida TG Lee milk is $3.79 a gal.

            Around here, Milk from Aldi’s or Wal-Mart runs right @ $1.50 a gallon.

            Most potatoes here are contracted for a set price ($14 this year) and if the farmer can fill his contract he will earn a decent profit. This year the weather was perfect and they expect a bumper crop.

            Not many potatoes grown here commercially; but, lots of corn, soybeans, and wheat, also grown on contract, often with bins full from the previous year to cover the spread. I was able to get deals on my propane tanks because of this, since many farms use propane to run their own grain dryers, so on premise tanks and summer fills are not uncommon. There is also a lot of dairy and some beef & pork production locally, with one friend calling those little porkers his piggy banks, since they are relatively cheap to keep (they eat anything) and can be taken to market anytime for a quick cash infusion.

            Any over the contracted amount can be sold on the open market. Some farmers here will make $millions.

            Farmers here do the same with crops and livestock; but, those millions are a bit deceptive. You can easily make $500,000.00 in the fall, and get some pretty good tax write offs; but, what’s left has to not only pay the bills (including health care, retirement, etc.) for the year, you need enough left over in the spring, to purchase fuel, feed, fertilizer, etc. to plant the new crop. The DW is a farm girl; but, never realized how her parents stretched their money, until I was laid off most of a year and was doing contract engineering work. I would work a contract segment, often for 6-8 weeks, and then bill a ton of hours at once, often as much as $15-20K. When we cashed the check we had to put some aside for taxes (Federal, State, Local, FICA), for health care, and then budget what was left until a future contract was paid. It was a real eye opener for her; but, something farmers and some businesses do regularly.

  8. i am fairly simple, and i perfer simpler hand tools that don’t break easy and are easy to fix, ax, bow saw, spade, hoe, rake, pulaski, to start with, then chainsaw, wheel hoe, wheelbarrow, type stuff. i only just started using tractors and more often than not i still ignore the machinery and use labor intense hand tools. of course i am in incredible physical shape and endurance despite the unhealthy diet (as i type this i am eating a dozen cupcakes) in a shtf situation i would still be using my hand powered stuff and maybe the chainsaw, though i can cut more than enough with hand tools. i can also make a lot of hand tools and have rebuilt a lot (my current wheelbarrow for example was made entirely with lumber cut by me, screws and nails and an axle and wheel from a broken wheelbarrow, but i could have made those from scrap, and have used elm wood wheels before)

    i am not too concerned, i only get my feed locally, local hay for the cattle (been trading a full cord of pine round for 3 round bales, people like the pine firewood in their outdoor boilers, i get the hay i need and get rid of the waste left from logging and milling), my chickens eat a lot of layer pellets but i have a 6 month supply still and i will pay little more if i have to when i resupply, or i can trade firewood for it as the menonites who own the feed store take firewood on trade for store credit (also cedar fence posts and other goods).

    japanese knotweed, cooked like asparagus, phragmites reeds rhyzomes, mashed dried, rehydrted and toasted like marshmallow, cattail shoots, leeks, wild growing asparagus.

    walked a total 80 miles getting back in shape from a couple weeks couch potato-ing it while the weather was bad, cut about 5 cords of firewood to stack for trading in the fall, got 8 broody hens setting on bout a dozen eggs each (mostly buff orpingtons, they go $2 a chick, or $10 an immature bird straight run at the weekly amish auctions) dug out the ditch in the garden deeper, made a new handle for a spade and another for a hoe, got a bunch of supplies in town (rode to the bigger town with a neighbor little while ago and got misc groceries, some repair parts and a box of a dozen cupcakes on sale since they expire tonight, $7 normal price, $1.50 sale price). also got another phone card for att prepaid i hate, ueless mostly except the internet access (why i am here now).

    links to what i wrote about hand tools, figuring a 12 hour work day cutting up smaller diameter wood i can make a full cord a day with a hand saw (3 and a half such days a year to heat my cabin) https://www.self-reliance.com/2016/12/harvesting-firewood/

    and the second link shows the garden i had with a wheel hoe, one of them anyway, this was a 50×50 garden and i had a much larger area outside the fence which later had fences added. the garden was covered in thick woods when i started, u cut everything out, removed stumps with hand tools (comealongs and pulaski) used a wheel hoe with a middlebuster type head to break everything up, then a duckbill cultivator head to mix and cultivate it, then the plow again to lay furrows, hand seeded, used a rake to cover. then used a hoe or an ocilating hoe on the wheel hoe to keep it clear. lots of labor with hand tools, and square foot gardening methods, the article was about my woodchuck war (i took heavy losses despite how many i trapped or shot) then the fence kept them out. i have similar fences up now with electric wire above up to 8 foot but 1 foot between lines to keep deer out. i can work my acre grden with the hand tools but these days i break it up and harrow with an old ford 641 then use the and tools. https://www.backwoodshome.com/woodchuck-proof-the-garden/

    oh and nemoseto is an anagram with nemo being latin for nobody and seto being made from my name, figured i would mention than since my names on those articles.

  9. I got my black shelf up the stairs, and it has my extra pasta, cereal’s, paper towels, getting my upstairs back into order. I’m doing the once every 6 months, rotate food and making a list of the foods I’m running short on. I did pick up 5 boxes of Kleenex, from the Dollar tree, a few office supplies just getting each room cleaned and organized. My kid’s are finally, getting their room’s organized too very glad they are doing it it’s been making school mornings, easier too. I didn’t do any shopping this last week I really want to have all cupboards, in ship shape. I did get a box of 100 tea bags, and a box of tea cookies, for my parents when they come up next. I ordered from Amazon, a water filter for the Hideout Camper, and electric lighter, it charges with a USB cable and it’s supposed to get 1000 light in between each charge, I’ll let everyone know next week how we like it and if it was worth the money I spent… I also bought 2 boxes of Gravorial Tea, my parents wanted to try it and with my mom breast cancer, 3 year’s clear she thought it would be good to have. I’d like to send a box to my husband’s Aunt she’s 1 year free but I will have to see if she would try it too… All my plants are growing well 😊 spring is here lots of rain coming in the next few days.

    Question 1. Seeds, and good fertilizer, good green house.

    Question 2. Yes, I believe food prices will go up and gas prices too.

    Question 3. I don’t pick anything weed like right now… I do read about weeds, and what they do….

    1. mom of three,

      electric lighter, it charges with a USB cable and it’s supposed to get 1000 light in between each charge, I’ll let everyone know next week how we like it and if it was worth the money I spent

      I have four of these in different versions, all purchased at a discount from woot.com. They are actually called a ”plasma lighter” and I carry one in my EDC all of the time, along with a mini Bic and a ferrocerium rod. These plasma lighters produce a small arc at 1100 °C or 2012°F and will light anything from paper and cardboard to cigarettes and pipes. We also have a long one we use to relight pilot lights on the oven and water heater.

      1. Nice, can’t wait to use this lighter. I only bought it so I would get free shipping the water filter, is what we needed. We’re getting to the point in life where we don’t really need to buy a bunch of stuff…

        1. mom of three,

          Nice, can’t wait to use this lighter. I only bought it so I would get free shipping the water filter, is what we needed. We’re getting to the point in life where we don’t really need to buy a bunch of stuff

          We use Amazon prime so I already get the free shipping on both Amazon & Woot; but, I understand about have enough or too much stuff, LOL.

    2. We just bought a NOAA radio from Lowe’s in January, it was clearance out at $7.99 down from $33.99, it’s only come on once letting us know about a storm coming down from Canada. Depending if we go to my parents house, or our second property we could leave in about 15 to 30 minutes, grabbed the cat, her cage, and her backpack, grabbing any extra food, I leave bag’s in the back of the car to store stuff in. I do have different types of seeds that grow in the rainy PNW, we do have two life straws, plus each morning, I refill my Britta water pitcher, and keep it full all day. I also water bath can in my extra quart glass jars, the filtered water, I’m up to 3 extra Gallons along with the 1 gallon’s of the water in the plastic bottles, can’t have enough water for sure.

  10. Hi Everyone,

    Tara, you always have good stories from your homestead. I love to ride horses. It’s been a long time though. Nothing like seeing the world from the back of a horse.

    We’ve had a couple of days of nice weather this week.. Too bad I had to work. Rain today, storms tonight, rain and storms again tomorrow. Of course it’s the weekend. 🙂

    A friend on the other side of town came to a town just south of me as she wanted to track it to see how long it would take her if she got the job she is interviewing for on Tuesday. Prayers that she gets it. We met up at Cracker Barrel and used my gift card from a student that I had precepted last fall. It was delicious. Got some biscuits and gravy and apples left over for tomorrow’s breakfast. While there, they had some peacock items on sale, and I bought a couple of things for my sister. She is having a hard time after my BIL passed away, and hoping these will cheer her up. I head down there next Friday to go with her to a Garth Brooks concert, and spend a few days helping her get rid of stuff. After breakfast, my friend and I went to a neat store that has all these comfort things, like cotton blankets, old looking signs, pillows with cute saying, candles, rugs, all this rugged home decor. Another trip is in store sometime in the near future. Then we went to drop off some things I had to donate, and then headed to my house. I had a stash of the Brach’s Malted Milk Eggs that I had bought and wanted to give her a few. I know it’s not a prep, and the day was pretty much wasted as far as getting anything done, but sometimes it’s nice to take a mental break not do a thing. I will be making up for it tomorrow.

    I received the ASAP 22ppm silver, the Olive Leaf extract veggies caps from Seagate (got 2 bottles for the price of one), ammo, tomahawk, mesh laundry bags.

    Sold and mailed a KISS t-shirt, and have someone interested in a very nice Merino wool sweater. Listed some other things on FB Marketplace.

    Been gathering stuff up for barter day.

    Really like my new schedule at work. Work 4 – 10 hr days, off every other Friday and Monday, for a 4 day weekend.

    Prayers for the pack, The President, and for America. Go Preds!

    Tara’s questions:
    What kind of agriculture equipment do you think is most important to have on your homestead now and/or during a SHTF event?

    Items to garden with both gasoline powered and manual. I am very impressed with nemoseto’s list. I will definitely be reading up on those articles.

    Are you concerned about either high food prices or supply issues this year because of the flooding that harmed so many farmers and ranchers?

    For sure. Nebraska is the bread basket for America. And leader in beef…. Gas has gone sky high around here at $2.65. It went up 10 cents overnite.

    What types of edibles do you forage for in the early spring where you live and how do you use them?
    None, but am identifying some for use later, like plantain and dandelions.

    Thor’s questions:

    1. How fast could you bugout if you are forced to evacuate? Would you be safe?

    It would take me at least 30 minutes. I have stuff in my car, but would need a few more clothes, and get the cat in the carrier, and cat food, litter… Not sure if I would be safe as I’m not sure where I would go.

    2. How many different kinds of water filter systems do you have?

    I have many bandannas, life straws, Berkey, Seychelles water bottles, extra filters, coffee filters, pots to boil water, SteriPen Quantum UV Water Purifier, WAPI.

    Need to get one of these, per my brother’s advice.

    http://www.jmccanneyscience.com/SecWebOrderPg.htm

    Scroll down until you find the filters. They are the very BEST on the planet, have used and cleaned them many, many times over the years. Pricey, but one of the best investments of green ink on paper you will ever make, ……………………..second to silver!”

    3. Do you have a seed stockpile? Yes. Need more bags of dirt though in case I have to plant incognito. Still need a solar grow light (if they make them) and want to get a couple/some of these…. https://greenstalkgarden.com/

    4. Do you have a NOAA weather alert radio? Yes, 2. One battery/electric, one solar

    5. What do you think of Trump busing illegal aliens to sanctuary cities? LOVE IT. Drop them all off there, and then make Komifornia it’s own country.

    Have a great week everyone.

    1. I’m sorry your sister, is having a hard time with her husband passing try and get her to seek some counseling, if she’s not all ready doing it. My mother in law refused to get counseling after her partner passed away and she did the grieving process backwards, she blew through money like we use Kleenex, it’s just sad and she has on set dementia, and we’re having a hard time finding a place for her to live.

  11. The Spring garden is coming along nicely, thanks to frequent rains. Green beans are forming, as are avocados, pineapples, grapes, bananas, figs, and tomatoes. Everywhere I look, there’s FOOD GROWING! YAY. I’m picking my mulberry trees every other day, freezing the berries until I have time to either make jelly or mead.

    Had to chuckle earlier today as a “friend” from church tried to get me to sell her some of my elderberry syrup. Uh, no! I suggested that she google photos of the plant, then go hunting for some berries and make her own. They grow wild around here. She said, “I work, so I’m too busy, but I would buy some from you!” LOL (I’m a hobby farmer with over 40 animals, an extensive garden, AND a part time job off the farm. Guess she thinks I’m not very busy!) So, then I suggested that she just buy some on line…..wonder what she will think when she sees less than 8 ounces sells for over $14.00 ???

    BOL continues to develop. House should be done in less than 3 months. It’s set up well enough already that we could survive there if needed. Can’t wait to plant some permaculture up there.

    Still waiting for my Moringa seedlings to break through the soil. Baby goats will go to their new home in a couple of weeks. I stocked up this week on fly bags for the barn—it’s that time of year already.

    (1) Manual tools for the garden…lots of them
    (2) I’m not concerned about price increases due to the flooding. I’m sure it will happen, but it won’t matter as much with all we’re growing for ourselves.
    (3) I’m watch those elderberry bushes down the road so I can make some more of that syrup and tincture that won’t be sold to anybody—LOL!

    Keep learning, stocking up, and getting ready folks!

  12. What kind of agriculture equipment do you think is most important to have on your homestead now and/or during a SHTF event? Hand tools, wheelbarrow, etc,tractor with fuel as long as it lasts, and a horse capable of pulling. I have all three though the third one isn’t trained to harness yet.Working on it.
    Are you concerned about either high food prices or supply issues this year because of the flooding that harmed so many farmers and ranchers?I’ve been working toward alleviating that concern for 6 years now. I personally think it’s(the flooding) being created to cause chaos and thereby cause situations to create martial law. I don’t think that much flooding is natural.
    What types of edibles do you forage for in the early spring where you live and how do you use them? I don’t but maybe I should. Better yet, I will trade with those who have more time and knowledge than I do. Midwife skills are always handy.
    Thor’s Questions:
    How fast could you bugout if you are forced to evacuate? probably 24 hrs would get me the basics,but I would be leaving a lot behind that I would rather not. We are planning on bugging in. Would you be safe? relatively speaking, yes
    2. How many different kinds of water filter systems do you have? at least 4
    3. Do you have a seed stockpile? not saying
    4. Do you have a NOAA weather alert radio?yeppers
    5. What do you think of Trump busing illegal aliens to sanctuary cities? I think he’s calling the Dem’s bluff. I think some should have been eliminated while trying to cross, and the rest would have gotten scared and gone home. Might be time for vigilante justice in those areas.

    1. Babycatcher,

      I personally think it’s(the flooding) being created to cause chaos and thereby cause situations to create martial law. I don’t think that much flooding is natural.

      Et tu, BC? LOL
      I think you are half right here; but, no conspiracy to invoke martial law. Like New Orleans, much of the Midwestern plains are natural flood plains, with levies built to use the low lying land for cultivation. These levies are often built by the Army Corps of Engineers for flood abatement; but, local politicians often spend moneys, including grants on things other than maintenance, and sometimes they reap the rewards or penalties for doing so.
      Once again when we elect people who are not really watching out for their constituency; but, only toward their reelection, this is what we get. It’s also another reason to prep.

    2. BC, it could be the UN depopulation going on. There is actual documentation of this plan. Also they need to disarm Americans. Also documented…..no conspiracy theory here.

      I think you hit the nail on the head with Trump. Great poker player…..

      1. Thor1,

        BC, it could be the UN depopulation going on. There is actual documentation of this plan. Also they need to disarm Americans. Also documented…..no conspiracy theory here.

        That’s an interesting assertion; but, could you cite your documentation on the U.N. depopulation plan?
        This whole depopulation myth seems to be another social media construct, actually going back decades. The fact is that long ago, the aristocracy understood that if you kill off the peasants, then you have to plow the fields yourself.
        They want us fat, dumb, happy, obedient, unarmed and working (on their behalf)

          1. Just Sayin’ & Thor1,

            Agenda 2020 an d America 2050. nuf said.

            So you’re going to drag that dead horse out and beat it again.

            These are all part of the U.N. Agenda 21, which in general attempts to define & impose:

            Agenda 21 is a non-binding, voluntarily implemented action plan of the United Nations with regard to sustainable development. It is a product of the UN Conference on Environment and Development held in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, in 1992. … The “21” in Agenda 21 refers to the 21st Century.

            These are not treaties ratified by our senate per the constitution; but, agreements pushed by ”brilliant” scientists the likes of John Forbes Kerry & Albert Arnold Gore Jr. who pushed things like the Paris climate accord that even their own senate would not ratify, and Trump dismissed with a simple flick of his pen. Perhaps worth watching; but, not worrying about.

          2. Just Sayin’ & Thor1,

            Agenda 2020 an d America 2050. nuf said.

            So you’re going to drag that dead horse out and beat it again.

            These are all part of the U.N. Agenda 21, which in general attempts to define & impose the following:

            Agenda 21 is a non-binding, voluntarily implemented action plan of the United Nations with regard to sustainable development. It is a product of the UN Conference on Environment and Development held in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, in 1992. … The “21” in Agenda 21 refers to the 21st Century.

            Here are additional intentions of the U.N.:

            In 2015, countries adopted the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and its 17 Sustainable Development Goals. In 2016, the Paris Agreement on climate change entered into force, addressing the need to limit the rise of global temperatures.

            The 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) – part of a wider 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development – build on the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). These eight goals, set by the United Nations back in 2000 to eradicate poverty, hunger, illiteracy and disease, expire at the end of this year.

            The SDGs cover social, economic and environmental development issues including poverty, hunger, health, education, gender equality, clean water, sanitation, affordable energy, decent work, inequality, urbanization, global warming, environment, social justice and peace.

            The U.S. needs to be involved of course so we can pay for it all, which is why we needed to cut emissions while India and China burn all the coal they can.

            These are not treaties ratified by our senate per the constitution; but, agreements pushed by ”brilliant” scientists the likes of John Forbes Kerry & Albert Arnold Gore Jr. who pushed things like the Paris climate accord that even their own senate would not ratify, and Trump dismissed with a simple flick of his pen. They are perhaps worth watching; but, not worrying about, especially since we have cut emissions more than those in Europe who signed that accord.
            Imagine how much CO2 is being created just today while the notre dame cathedral burns to dust. Considering that building contained the trees from 52 acres of woods, seasoned for 850 years, it’s no wonder it went up so fast.

      2. Thor1,

        Yep, the UN has made no secret about wanting to disarm Americans.

        BC is right. I did mention before that the libs/socialists have already shown their true colors on this matter with their reaction to Trump’s Twitter. Just like happened when McConnell forced a vote in the Senate on the Green plan that AOC (aka: The Donkey) proposed.

        I think the libs/socialists are in a panic that Trump will not only bus illegals to the sanctuary cities, but specifically drop them off in front of their local district offices and tell them to go inside for money because the rich person who owns the office likes them. If that happened I’d probably pee myself from laughing too hard.

        1. Zulu 3-6,

          Yep, the UN has made no secret about wanting to disarm Americans.

          I agree with this; but, depopulating the world as a conspiracy?

          Just like happened when McConnell forced a vote in the Senate on the Green plan that AOC (aka: The Donkey) proposed.

          The Donkey is a pretty generic term for the Dems; but, I think since we’re using initials, AOC could also be called what I’ve been calling her to friends, ILG (Ignorant Little Girl)

          I think the libs/socialists are in a panic that Trump will not only bus illegals to the sanctuary cities, but specifically drop them off in front of their local district offices and tell them to go inside for money because the rich person who owns the office likes them. If that happened I’d probably pee myself from laughing too hard.

          Since Trump cannot do this without some legal entanglements on paying for transport, he should start a Go “Fund Me” campaign. I would contribute, and with enough small donations, say $5-20 I suspect we could not only hit the mark; but, pour even more panic on the Dems.

          1. TOP,

            Depopulating the world as a UN-led conspiracy? I’m not too certain about this one. I think population CONTROL is a more likely scenario. Its like someone else posted (whose name escapes me and please forgive my paraphrasing), when you kill off all the serfs, the lords have to plow the fields themselves. That ain’t gonna to happen. However, keeping the population numbers to a manageable number (manageable in their view), is not out of the bounds of possibility. In fact, I have read about that somewhere before. Eugenics writ large.

            Maybe we’re just arguing semantics.

            I call AOC “the Donkey” because when she smiles, with all her big teeth, she looks like “the Donkey” character on Shrek. Actually I got the term from my Ex as that is what she calls AOC.

          2. Bill Gates put it in a speech, was still up last time I checked. he said that vaccines were to control the population and healthcare for women were to reduce the population.HE SAID SO.It is the plan. It is why the UN is paying US tax dollars and giving illegals backpacks with USAID on them.
            To deny it is their plan means they said nothing….and do nothing. If you want your head in the sand , it is your right, but stop arguing about things that are planned and announced…. and they want this population to be sick, to be poisoned, to be autistic, and to glow like the reactors. Nothing to see here folks. move along.

          3. Anonamo Also,

            Bill Gates put it in a speech, was still up last time I checked. he said that vaccines were to control the population and healthcare for women were to reduce the population.HE SAID SO.It is the plan.

            I cannot find anything about controlling the population; but, there is an agenda to stop children from dying needlessly from preventable diseases that can be found here: Vaccine Delivery Strategy Overview
            https://www.gatesfoundation.org/What-We-Do/Global-Development/Vaccine-Delivery
            As for reducing population, birth control in 3rd world countries can prevent children from being born into poverty, where they may not survive their frist year of life, whihle vaccines can prevent those who survive from succumbing to preventable illnesses.

            If you want your head in the sand , it is your right, but stop arguing about things that are planned and announced…. and they want this population to be sick, to be poisoned, to be autistic, and to glow like the reactors. Nothing to see here folks. move along.

            My head is not in the sand and I know well about those agendas and plans and have read them. While there are probably some politicians who want control, for the most part there is no conspiracy here.
            And where do you find anything about keeping us sick, or poisoned? Our obesity and heart disease problems are mostly self inflicted by our lifestyle choices.
            If you still believe the myth that vaccines cause autism, you need to catch up, since it has been proven to be a myth and that myth is now causing a measles pandemic in some places.
            And where do you get the “glow like the reactors”? since nuclear power has not caused anything to glow,. Our worst accident was @ Three Mile Island in 1979 and no one is glowing there.

            And BTW who are the mysterious ”They?”</strong

          4. Zulu 3-6,

            Depopulating the world as a UN-led conspiracy? I’m not too certain about this one. I think population CONTROL is a more likely scenario
            ……………………
            Maybe we’re just arguing semantics.

            I agree and think that some population control, especially in 3rd world countries is perhaps a good thing, to stop or limit infant mortality or even to stop small skirmishes over limited resources.

            I call AOC “the Donkey” because when she smiles, with all her big teeth, she looks like “the Donkey” character on Shrek. Actually I got the term from my Ex as that is what she calls AOC.

            I can see that, LOL.

          5. Anonamo Also,

            TOP, Go to minute 2:30 on this short clip… only one minute is necessary. 15% population reduction via vaccines..,,that population growth goes down..

            I find it interesting how the anti vaxxers only pin point that one word and how the mention of reproductive health services gets completely ignored.

            With a little more digging, you would find that the vaccines are to keep the kids healthy into adolescence or adult hood, while reproductive health services allows more control over how many children families have and that combination does limit the population; but, not for any nefarious purpose.
            People in many 3rd world countries continue to have numerous children in a similar way rabbits breed, because when you live in a hostile environment, many offspring means that some are likely to survive into adulthood, no matter the problem. Vaccinating against common 3rd world diseases like cholera and diphtheria along with measles, smallpox, polio, etc. means that the children are more likely to survive, and the reason for having lots of them disappears.
            Perhaps I’m just more optimistic than you are; but, until you can give me a good reason for this depopulation conspiracy, I remain unconvinced.

        2. I love you Zulu! Don’t tell the Ex! Lol! Sometimes ya just gotta call a spade a spade, and get digging! Lol

          1. Babycatcher,

            Thanks. Love you too 🙂

            On a completely different note (or maybe not since it involves birthing babies), I am considering buying the “Varney’s Pocket Midwife” to add to my medical library. Do you have an opinion on this particular book?

    1. Almost There,

      Never liked beards or mustaches… Lol…. Guess I’m old school, high and tight, and clean shaven, soft as a baby’s butt. TEEHEE

      That’s easy for someone who can’t grow a beard to say, since you don’t have that issue. I started growing my beard the day I graduated high school, since in high school I could not have a beard and that meant shaving twice per day once I turned 16. My beard is kept close cropped and clean, and your article has some real flaws saying that dogs are more clean than bearded men. You will note that the guy who ran the study, Dr Gutzeit, was in Switzerland and used the amazingly large sample of 18 men which is statistically insignificant. Note also that while showers or baths daily, as most of us do, the Europeans are well known for their lack of baths and showers. A fellow engineer put on a seminar in Italy some years ago and noticed a cute young lady in a blue dress at the front of the room. By the end of the week, she was still wearing that same dress, and he noticed that many others in the class were likewise attired in week old clothing, at which point the room took on an aroma of unbathed people.
      Try that same experiment here in the US with a much larger sample size and I would bet you get a much different outcome. Someone who wanted to prove a point cherry picked this data. Must have been a progressive.

      1. TOP, do you ever laugh? Can you not find humor is this study and just let it go? Honestly.

        Like them or not, small sample size or not, the facts don’t lie. ALL of the men’s beards had germs. Food for thought here TOP! If and when TSHTF, and sanitation is lacking, food for thought!

        It’s real easy for me to say what I like and dislike when it comes to beards and mustaches. I was raised by a WWII Air Force pilot. Most WWII Veterans are the same, they like to be clean shaven and their hair cut short. All of us girls were afraid to bring anyone home that had a pony tail, earrings, tattoos, smoked and for sure beards. And if your dad don’t like someone, best to move on to the next one.

      2. Almost There,

        TOP, do you ever laugh? Can you not find humor is this study and just let it go? Honestly.

        Actually I can and once would have; but, today, even a pseudo scientific study like this is liable to give some politician an idea to further try and limit our lives. Untrustworthy politicians take the fun out of a lot of things.

        Like them or not, small sample size or not, the facts don’t lie. ALL of the men’s beards had germs. Food for thought here TOP! If and when TSHTF, and sanitation is lacking, food for thought!

        True that sanitation was lacking; but, they did the study in Europe where sanitation is sorely lacking all of the time so the full facts would most likely say something different.
        Post SHTF sanitation has no need to be lacking with some planning, since even our pioneer forefathers had or made soap and could make hot water.

        I was raised by a WWII Air Force pilot. Most WWII Veterans are the same, they like to be clean shaven and their hair cut short. All of us girls were afraid to bring anyone home that had a pony tail, earrings, tattoos, smoked and for sure beards.

        I was raised by a WWII army medic who didn’t mind my beard; but, would not have liked a pony tail or tattoos, since I like neither of then either.

        1. TOP and AT,

          I was raised by a WWII Marine. He always kept his hair short and was clean shaven. Us boys were frequently marched off to the barber for haircuts, want them or not.

          When the Beatles were becoming the thing in the US, I asked my dad if I could grow my hair like theirs. He said “Go ahead. Then I’ll cut your head off, have it bronzed, and display it on top of the TV set.” I took that to mean “No.” My mom was laughing her head off. That’s what you get when both your parents were Detroit cops.

          Personally, I hate to shave and don’t unless I have to. #1 daughter cuts my hair about once a month. Marine recruit special. I do keep a mustache and have since 1977.

          1. Zulu 3-6,

            I was raised by a WWII Marine. He always kept his hair short and was clean shaven. Us boys were frequently marched off to the barber for haircuts, want them or not.

            My dad was WWII Army; but, had the same problem I had / have, in that our hair was backwards. He was balding by the time I can remember and I was balding by high school; but, we both had to shave twice per day to keep up with the beard, so I often saw him after work with that proverbial 5:00 shadow. I never went to a barber until I was in college, since my mom was a beautician and even after she stopped working, she kept up her license and would cut our hair and sometimes do perms for the neighborhood ladies. For me growing the beard was just less work than trying to keep it from looking like unruly stubble. I now hit the barber about every 6-8 weeks just to keep what little hair I have trimmed & neat. For the same price my barber always levels out my beard, so all I actually shave is the skin under the mouth.
            I like to think that I’m not bald; but, just have had my hair succumb to gravity. LOL.

            When the Beatles were becoming the thing in the US, I asked my dad if I could grow my hair like theirs. He said “Go ahead. Then I’ll cut your head off, have it bronzed, and display it on top of the TV set.” I took that to mean “No.” My mom was laughing her head off. That’s what you get when both your parents were Detroit cops.

            I find this funny; but, ironic, since when I look at the long haired beatles compared to hair styles today, they really don’t seem all that long.

          2. Z36,

            See, it didn’t hurt a bit being marched off to the barber shop… And that style has lasted your whole life… 🙂

            Nowadays, your parents would be turned in for child abuse for “threatening” you like that.

          3. AT,

            Things have changed for certain. Sadly, not for the better. My dad beat me with a heavy leather belt but good one time when I was brought home by the police for trying to set a tree on fire (of all the stupid things I could pick, that was it). I was black and blue all over my butt and back of my legs. I didn’t dare complain at school as I went to a Catholic school and the nuns would just beaten me some more. I was in 5th grade.

            Unfortunately for me, one of the cops who brought me home was a friend of both my parents and had been an usher at their wedding. Fortunately for me, he knew they would handle the problem, so nothing went on paper.

            When I thought about it later, I deserved every lick I got. Damned sure learned my lesson.

        2. yup about politicians, the police state of ny where i am unfortunate to be is no changing the law regarding bac for hunters, wanting to reduce the offence thresh-hold from .01 to .008. most people hearing the news are going nuts supporting it thinking hunters shouldn’t drink and getting terrified of the idea a bunch of drunk are out in the woods in the fall with guns, fueling nys anti gun propaganda and making it sound like they are trying to crack down and ticket a dangerous trend and making hunters in general look bad and getting mental patient clubs like peta worked up about animal rights. but if anyone looks at the statistics they will see out of several million hunters every year only around 10 have actually been ticketed for being legally drunk. simply on the grounds they can’t hit anything when drunk. the new law is just about making it more likely that they can pass out tickets to people with a lower thresh-hold, and use the publicity to further nyc left wing loony agendas

          1. nemoseto,

            .008? Wow. That’s a rounding error on most hand-held breath testers. In fact, most that I am familiar with, won’t even measure that low. Neither will most of the in-station instruments. It would require a laboratory to measure that low.

            Are you sure it’s 8-thousandth of 1% BAC by volume (usually 100ml of blood) and not 8-hundredth (.08%)? That is the legal standard for drunk driving these days (used to be .10% BAC back in my day on the job).

          2. i don’t drink, i just remember the newspaper numbers being 1 something reduced to an 8 something.

          3. Nemoseto,

            yup about politicians, the police state of ny where i am unfortunate to be is no changing the law regarding bac for hunters, wanting to reduce the offence thresh-hold from .01 to .008. most people hearing the news are going nuts supporting it thinking hunters shouldn’t drink and getting terrified of the idea a bunch of drunk are out in the woods in the fall

            I’ve been hunting for more than 50 years and teaching hunter education for 27 years, and I think that guns and alcohol don’t mix, period. I think 12 hours is a good time to make sure you are good to go, since you don’t have to be inebriated, to be dangerous, especially when a typical deer camp means a lack of sleep. We would all gather around a campfire, drink some adult beverages and swap lies; but, that was only after the hunt, with the guns all cleaned and stored away. Here in Ohio I may go into a bar or a restaurant that serves alcohol while carrying my concealed handgun; but, I cannot have any alcoholic beverage of any sort. A good rule is one a friend of mine who is a retired naval aviator tells me, ”12 hours bottle to throttle”. If someone has to have a drink any time, they should seek help.

          4. ohio prepper

            thats kinda what i was getting at when i was saying it wsn’t a problem, there are only around 10 people a year who have been caught hunting with alcohaul, out of millions of hunters. its not an issue at all, but its all over the news drumming up anti gun liberlismm and making everyone think its a huge problem. ny been passing a lot of even stranger and stricter laws recently. another is that all children on school bus’ must have seatbelts on at all times and if any kid doesn’t then the driver is punished. they expnded the seatbelt law so that everyone in a vehicle must have a belt on, used to be only front seat passangers and anyone under 18 in the back had to, but now everyone must, or back seat passangers and the driver will be ticketed if caught. its like they ran out of things to do and are now nit picking anything they can find to tighten the laws on and have more cops issue tickets for.

  13. Good evening Pack, Preps have been tight this week but just continue making steps to our goals. removing items from freezer and stabilizing in some manner for shelf stability./depending on need/our preference. Securing and rotating all dry goods thru the freezer as space available. and securing in water/airtight packaging..Have continued to help at family’s place. More to do but a work in progress.We did much outside work this week, with the yard needing mowing for the second time this year and the rain rolling in.We had only one day to get as much as possible done. we have put out a grape vine a goji berry and a hops plant…and still working to lengthen and deepen the drainage for the back.
    The powered tools for doing that would be nice to have..along with all of the things needed to make them use-able. air and fuel filters,spark plugs, cable,files,string or strips for weed eaters and of course fuel. we keep some on hand . Gas has gone up 10-15 cents , (noticed it this am as opposed to wed of last week. or current price is 2.699 for lowest grade gasoline blend. Hand tools and supplies and ability to adapt to alternate grow methods I expect to be vital., not only for me but for those who are unable to do regular gardening techniques. I have been watching this food supply problem develop for a while..natural and manmade disasters are never far away, so was only a matter of time… Natural Disasters are not covered by insurance as a general rule..
    I routinely forage wild greens mostly Curley Dock, plantain(herb) and dandelion. Now is the time to begin collecting those and dehydrating…It takes a lot of wild greens dehydrated and crumbled to fill a quart jar. They can add many vitamins and mineral to the diet when added to stews and soups.. I also feed the ones that are too big or tough to the chickens. along with henbit and clover, routinely thru the summer. we will be gathering henbit/clover as it is cut/available this summer for winter feed. In the spring i cut any dry sage grass remaining and place in bins for use for nesting boxes. Plantain herb leaves are collected each spring and triple tinctured for allergy applications. sweetgum for homemade tamiflu. Dandelion has many uses..a cleanser and diuretic..all part are edible ..Wild lettuce is best gathered as it blooms for its effects…it does work well for insomnia for some people and takes very little for a dose so a pint would /could fill 4 family’s needs for a year… if taken on a PRN basis.
    We have never planned to bug out. .. much would depend on the reason for an evacuation…some provisions are made in case of severe weather event, and certain preps are made as tornado events draw near…meaning we pay extra attention to weather reports and pull current radars up and often watch storms for several hours in advance. I prepare things we may need depending on time of day/ anticipated needs.-duration expeced and urgency…. we do have a place to go and would not take long to get to one of 3 places… we would be safe with what we took to any of those locations… for weather event. Flooding would be something very hard to repare for because of too many variables…in our area… No dams, to break- so no clue where would come from and how much lead time we could get on it… if expectation was expected to be huge would need 8 hours minimum…w/minimum of 3 hrs drive time.have a tenative plan… but unable to do a trial on this. would necessarily be an emergency to impliment. seed? some,: radio yes. :water treatment/ filters yes. :
    trump Exposure of the liars who say they are for the immigrant, yet refuse to feed and clothe hem personally. Each person who votes for ILLEGAL immigration should have their house opened and property opened for free use by those illegals. Nancy pukeosi has already called police on some illegals entering her outer WALL, but she does not want one to protect the nation? Who is payng for her vote, FOLLOW THE MONEY> Think Border should be closed. Make it a live fire zone. complete with tanks and mortar fire….Until the WALL is complete… Those who run across- put one foot and holler” asylum” , get reason. if not sufficient, and they can not be vetted , say NO! Over Done. go home.ILLEGALS have NO RIGHTS to impose upon legal residents.

    I have also done another few hours of research on how i can set up wicking tubs..the natural fertilizers needed to make plants of several kinds do well in those…The good thing is directions are out and available… and they can be utilized by someone with little space to grow something…and those who are disabled, young and clueless….as long as they can follow directions. gardener with 56 years experience has posted several new video’s this week using mostly supplies one has on hand to set them up.., he exains concepts so that one can apply to what you have on hand…..buckets, tubs,55 ga. drums., cola bottles, milk jugs, bleach bottles, vinegar jugs, cola cans,.. check out Gardening with Leon…Here is one of his last 3 posts… https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oSl8s4hyVZY

    There will be many people who have no clue what/how to grow.The problem is macaroni and cheese, TV dinners, and frozen entree’ s do not grow on plants individually.,..Some people are just too ….dense to begin a change before it is forced upon them. They will suffer because of own thoughts limiting what they believe they can not eat, .”.because they ate too much of it as a child”….and are long past childhood. Those with diet limitations that cause physical symptoms will have a whole ‘nother set of challenges. I ordered a different set of digestive enzymes this week to try to see if it helps us with our intolerances.

    1. Anonamo Also,

      There will be many people who have no clue what/how to grow.The problem is macaroni and cheese, TV dinners, and frozen entree’ s do not grow on plants individually

      I think your way out of line here, since you are actually talking about cooking something, like a frozen entree, LOL.
      Too many people think food comes in a bag, with sandwiches wrapped in paper, fries and drinks in a cup.

      Some people are just too ….dense to begin a change before it is forced upon them.

      I don’t know that it’s dense; but, at least normalcy bias and conformation bias, since they have done it all their lives and don’t know another way. I was lucky to be cooking & canning with both parents by age 7 or 8 and also don’t know another way.

      They will suffer because of own thoughts limiting what they believe they can not eat, .”.because they ate too much of it as a child”….and are long past childhood.

      While I don’t like really hot spicy foods, I have never found anything I cannot eat, and regularly eat things others will not. Things like liver & onions or head cheese are great foods in moderation, as are heart or tongue. Except for spicy hot things, I’m willing to try anything and have eaten anything that didn’t eat me first, although I did once eat a snake that tried to bite me.

      Those with diet limitations that cause physical symptoms will have a whole ‘nother set of challenges. I ordered a different set of digestive enzymes this week to try to see if it helps us with our intolerances.

      I wish you luck on moderating your intolerances; but, really don’t understand, since I can and do eat everything. The DW is lactose intolerant; but, there are solutions for that, and the DD is allergic to any soy protein, so she has become a detailed reader of labels. We all do what we must.

      1. TOP, there are too many days when the only thing i can eat are white rice and Ice water. Have known I was having enzyme problem for a while but each bout of gastritis makes it worse.Now have to find right sets of enzymes for pretty much every food i can eat part time. The ones I can’t eat..at all now-( beans, legumes, all nuts)may also be changed with proper enzymes..
        I have DFM’s.. morbidly obese. only eat pre prepared foods .DUH!.” won’t eat many things including ANY long storing food. Any cooked food must be prepared by a recipe that is loaded with HFCS, sugar,and sweet goo. …. Rice,Ramen and pasta may not be their best choices even for now, but if they loose ACCESS to prepared foods they will need to have something..but will not eat certain styles of pasta or rice because of its texture.??? .I have shown them what the wild greens look like and which ones on that place are edible. going to try to show them some of the wicking beds…and how they perform first hand.. Only one has life experience that will help out of the 3…One says “mom never warmed up caned pork and beans so they HAVE to be cold…. the other says.Mom never fixed them that way and i don’t like it… without heating… I am not cooking for them! If i ever have to, they will all loose some weight.
        Oh, eggs.. 3 adults only eat 3 dozen in 5 weeks…. and that is healthy high protein… it just blows my mind.

          1. Prevacid 30 mg 2 times a day..now is otc, in 15 mg. so i buy a 45 count. and pack for long term. but using it stops absorbtion of many minerals and vitamins. usually i take 2 x a day til edema in abdomen is down and i no longer appear 6 months… then i go to once daily for 4 more days. then off. I also have to use when i take any nsaid.so keep a few months supply normally. have enzyme in everlasting./helps well as a tea. source for it has now been contaminated by power company in multiple areas. supply is limited… starting new areas this year. where they have no access…will continue to be alert for new areas of growth.

          2. I finally found out (after 2 years) that my main issue was mushrooms. I can eat things cooked with them but not the ‘srhoom itself. Now my attacks are VERY rare. But the discomfort/swelling was/is very miserable and the gas…. (the dog looked at me and left the room).

        1. AA, looks like there may be a bunch of burials in your future, but not yours. Are there plants that have the enzymes you need, or how to you get them in a grid down situation?

          1. B.C. That is my evaluation as well… some people just can not be helped…until they decide to change. I am still trying to find one ( enzyme) that works well, One I had before i needed double dosing twice a day, but made a big difference. taking 6 pills of one product is not optimal. Makes it too hard to get other things in,(w/ limited volume capability.)…that are also requirements. Once i make sure this new one works i will order enough i can take it continually for 2 years, w/ enough capsules to encapsulate…double that amount… once one begins encapsulating natural things there is always something sold in bulk that is cheaper and needs to be in capsules. must dot he same with astralagus and lions mane.
            because of gastric surgery i can NOT take anything that has/makes a lot of bubbles….so alka seltzer is out. could bust my pouch or twist my gut.all colas have to sit and go flat/ be shaken..don’t have one often, ..but landed in ER at 1 am once from eating cheese and drinking a cola.DX: twisted small intestine..5 days of low intermittent suction and an NG tube. before it untwisted. The edema from gastritis can cause a twist by it’self and to add gas only makes it worse. the enzymes should help contol the gastritis. finally going for the prevention part instead of treatment.

    2. lol, i once had some peta-rded college 20 something scream at me for butchering chickens, telling me farmers should stop killing animals like its the middle ages and buy meat at the store where its made without hurting animals

      1. nemoseto,

        I’ve heard of this happening to other people. Some kids these days are really stupid.

        In my past occupation (police), we used to get similar stupid remarks, like, “You didn’t read me my rights, so this is a false arrest!” That one always amused the judges.

      2. Nemoseto,

        telling me farmers should stop killing animals like its the middle ages and buy meat at the store where its made without hurting animals

        This reminds me of an incident 45+ years ago while in college. It was the early 1970’s and dairy farmers around the country were staging demonstrations where they were dumping their milk for the TV cameras as a protest against low prices. I was discussing this with a fellow student in the parking lot and his wife chimed in that it didn’t affect her, since she bought her milk at the local Kroger. We had a laugh and he was mortified; but, told me later that she was serious.

          1. Babycatcher,

            Evidently a degree in Economics from Brown University is about as useful as Underwater Basket Weaving 🙂

          2. Babycatcher,

            I bet she had a major in Women’s studies or Underwater Basket weaving!

            Actually, her husband, my fellow student was in the engineering curriculum with me, and she was just the stay at home wife. To be sure we were all young back then (18-22); but, it did stun both me and her husband.

          3. Zulu 3-6,

            Evidently a degree in Economics from Brown University is about as useful as Underwater Basket Weaving

            I don’t know about Brown; but, Boston college let AOC in and she also graduated with no useful knowledge.
            When I checked AOC to make sure of her college, Wikipedia listed Boston; but, also something I was unaware of. AOC’s ”Partner” is Riley Roberts with the photo of a rather cute young lady. While I’m not being judgmental, her persecution complex could well involve other issues the MSM is not talking about.

          4. Zulu 3-6,

            Ah, I “misspoke.” I did mean Boston U. I had Brown on my brain for some reason.

            I wasn’t sure; but, thought that might be the case since we were discussing the donkey girl; however, for some people (like the Hollywood elites) school is about prestige and bragging rights and has little to do with education.
            I think some of those folks are about to get some free, well deserved, long term room and board, on us.

  14. Since all of our gardens are raised beds, we don’t need any power equipment for that. We do have an electric weed trimmer for the yard. I admit I would like to have a small tractor and implements in case we have to take over the adjoining property, which is fallow. I would hate to think of trying to harvest enough firewood without the chain saw. We do have a backup, extra oil, gasoline and multiple chains.

    I do not worry about higher food prices. I believe higher prices for everything are inevitable. Congress will never stop spending more than the total taxes collected, which makes inflation inevitable. Good reason to have hard assets.

    This week, I made and froze 6 lbs of meatloaf, made and canned 9 quarts of chili con carne. Did more re-arranging of stuff – a never ending process.

    I don’t forage in spring any more. We will be in Alabama in mid June and I will probably pick some wild blackberries and harvest some sassafras roots. Also, I will probably pick some prickly pear fruit in the summer to make jelly.

    Realistically, it will probably take us a couple hours to bug out. Too many things we would absolutely hate to leave. Freezer full of food, particularly meat. Xtra cold/foul weather clothing. Additional weapons and ammo. We keep at least 1/2 tank of gasoline in each vehicle and have more stabilized gas stored in a concrete block bin in the back. Thankfully, our BOV has lots of cargo space and we have a half ton pickup as well. Counting on normalcy bias among the population to allow us the ability to go.

    1. Billy T,

      We do have an electric weed trimmer for the yard. I admit I would like to have a small tractor and implements in case we have to take over the adjoining property, which is fallow.

      We are still looking at a new or used Kubota; but, since this will be our first endeavor with diesel, we have to consider how best to keep a supply on hand.

      I would hate to think of trying to harvest enough firewood without the chain saw. We do have a backup, extra oil, gasoline and multiple chains.

      I have an old; but, still operational Stihl 028 wood boss, and a little Poulan chainsaw we inherited, both of which are 2 cycle and take the mixed fuel. Another little electric that uses a 110 VAC power connection; but, the most recent are the 10” pole saw and the 10” chainsaw from the Ryobi ONE+ series. I also have many other tools, batteries, and chargers for this series, so if we can get power by any means to charge the batteries, we are still good to go.
      As I get older, handling that larger saw has also become a bit more difficult and dangerous, so the little ones also have that advantage.
      We also have the ONE+ weed trimmer.

      1. Hi OP. I would be in bad shape if not for my grandsons, sons and step son! Thankfully, they all like to work, I can handle the chain saws pretty well, but the stamina is not what I wish it was.
        Regarding a prospective tractor, lack a place to keep it and nothing productive to use it for at present.

        1. Billy T,

          I can handle the chain saws pretty well, but the stamina is not what I wish it was.

          I have the same stamina problem; but, have learned to chip away at things a little at a time, since for the most part, time is all I have.

          Regarding a prospective tractor, lack a place to keep it and nothing productive to use it for at present.

          We have numerous places to keep it; but, right now are trying to work out appropriate payment/financing. We have a good rototiller; but, that strength and stamina issue is why we’re looking at something I can drive with a tiller instead of trying to wrestle one in the garden.
          Also having a bucket or backhoe attachment would make other things here a lot easier.

      1. Zulu 3-6,
        To Bam Bam.

        Hope you’re OK. But that’s what happens when you play with katanas and such

        It’s interesting how these little mentions can fire off really old memory synapses.
        Using various martial arts weapons and various other nasty cutting tools like chainsaws, I’ve never harmed myself; but, back in the mid 1970’s out of college for only a few years, I managed a nasty one preparing my first Thanksgiving Turkey. I had the bird nearly ready to go, and as I was rubbing butter all over the skin, in preparation for placing it in the oven, I felt some large chunks of fat that I hadn’t removed. I grabbed the nice sharp knife I had been using, and stupidly held it point down, like I was going to stab something, and started working on the chunk of fat. I evidently hit a bone and with my still greasy buttered hand, helplessly felt the hand slide down across the sharp blade. It cut clear through the web on my right hand and as I recall it didn’t even hurt. I wrapped the hand with a paper towel, place the bird back into the fridge, and drove myself to the local E.R. only a few blocks away at the time. I’ve never done anything like that since; but, like so many lessons in life, it had to hurt to sink in. LOL.

  15. This Week’s Questions:

    1. What kind of agriculture equipment do you think is most important to have on your homestead now and/or during a SHTF event? Currently, a good tractor and tiller. I think both will be important if SHTF as well. I also believe that general small tools like wrenches, hammers and screw drivers will be important.
    2. Are you concerned about either high food prices or supply issues this year because of the flooding that harmed so many farmers and ranchers? I am somewhat concerned but also know that there are a LOT more cow farmers in North Georgia now than there have been in many years and North Georgia has not been affected by the flooding. I also don’t drink a lot of cow’s milk, so that much is not an issue. North Georgia is also know for having a large number of chicken farmers and I have seen a LOT of new chicken houses built where old ones have fallen in or been bulldozed. I think there is a lot of local farming happening here that may help offset the price increases for us.
    3. What types of edibles do you forage for in the early spring where you live and how do you use them? None. If SHTF, I have wild onions and day lilies. We will also have dandelions and nuts.
    4. What did you do to prep this week? The DH has finished cutting down some overgrown bushes, put everything he could through the chipper-shredder and added that to the garden. We’ve been stacking the log-sized pieces for firewood later. I’ve been getting to know my new dehydrator with some citrus then made a batch of apple butter from about 15 pounds of apples before the apples got too old. I set aside some applesauce for myself for the week. I put most of my seedlings outside in a mini greenhouse to get them ready for the garden and get them some extra light. They need to grow some more before planting.

    That’s about it for now – time to read what everyone else has been doing. Prayers for those in need, as always.

    1. GA Red,

      also know that there are a LOT more cow farmers in North Georgia now than there have been in many years and North Georgia has not been affected by the flooding.

      We have a lot of dairy and beef around here and while dairy cattle like Holsteins are not as good for meat as beef cattle like Angus, we did butcher one of those years ago, and except for the large bones and a bit less meat, they were fine. This flooding problem may make people look at buying localy and expanding what they eat.

      North Georgia is also know for having a large number of chicken farmers and I have seen a LOT of new chicken houses built where old ones have fallen in or been bulldozed.

      We have the same here; but, are you talking chicken farmers or egg farmers. We have a local place that keeps close to a million hens, for egg production. These are the ones that are rather confined and produce an egg eash per day. When they no longer produce enough eggs, they are sold in bulk and and up as little chunks of meat in your chicken noodle soup.
      Eggs from here are shipped all over the country; but, we prefer our own little free range flock.

      I think there is a lot of local farming happening here that may help offset the price increases for us.

      Like here I assume you have local farm markets where the farmers can make some decent money and you get the better local products.

      1. some of my first chickens came from old eggaries, bigger menonite opperations have been hatching up all over this area. they cull the birds when they are a year old, scrawny from putting all their energy into eggs (RIR hybrids), and tough, anyone can show up any time and buy a truckload of year old hens for really cheep. the meat softens up when pressure canned, and they still have a good egg laying rate (not as good as first year but commercial opperations want the most bang for the cluck, and they have more return from replacing birds than keeping older ones). unfortunatly few live to reach 3, they are bred for rapid production and eventually wear out and drop dead. cheep egg layers and if you let them free range they are not a big loss if one disapears

        going to experiment with homemade pluckers this year then i might get into buying and canning older commercial birds (made one to fit on a drill using pvc 4 inch cap and rubber bunji cords but i am looking at bucket ones now with a hand crank).

  16. nemoseto,

    You, a couch potato…. Never…. Sometimes, we gotta take a break from all the monotony of prepping, and living… Letting our body rest once in a while lets us rebuild our immune system back up.

    Where did you learn all your skills from?

    1. just today i walked 15 miles to town since the bike shop is open for the season and checked out their inventory will be getting a ride out to buy one tomorrow. made the trip with 2.5 lb weights on each foot and didn’t bring more than $20 so wasn’t gonna bike back and too exhausted to walk tomorrow (burn 4 times the calories and grow leg muscle twice as fast, my legs are so muscular they look like popeyes arms bulged out). couch potato is not something i call myself except as a joke.

      i learned what i know because of the way i think, observe and process information

      trowel and error, my first construction projects were not pretty, and my first gardens failed and i had to master the problems before i succeeded. being poor is also an incentive to experiment, if you have no money and don’t loose anything on trying something and it fails then you loose only your time, but still gain experience on what not to do next time, and when you succeed you gain something without having lost anything.

      reading, i read a lot of old books, i read a lot of history and how to books, and take the perspective of if it worked then why not now, so a lot of my old timey skill came from reverse engeneering something i read about briefly (like burdock candy, i read that it could be used as candy but that was it, just one sentence and i could find no other refrence to it since it was something people did back before commercial candy was common and there is no demand for it in stores or need for the skill today, i read comparative processes for other homemade candy like whorehound and licorice and experimented until i got it right, gaining a skill in making candy from nothing but local resources and experience i could use in other food preparation later plus a greater understanding of history, how people lived in the past and the context behind why they did things the way they did.

      observation, when i walked to town i stopped by an abandoned old brick structure and looked at how it was made and tried to guess what it was for, i do that with a lot of old buildings and machinery, looking at what it did and how it worked, and have often replicated stuff i had seen, also hearing accounts from other people about how they did stuff (like an old guy who told me to hang laundry to dry inside when heating with wood, helps humidify the air, at the time i air dried outside and used a kettle on the stove to humidify the air, same dry air dries food rapidly so would make fruit leather and dried pumpkins, people did it in the past but it only works when your only heat source is wood stove). i fixed my wheel hoe by looking at the old broken parts and replicating them with materials on hand. i gain some knowledge from old pictures too, and have incorporated wooden latches on my sheds that i reverse engeneered from old 1800s pictures, local amish just nail a scrap of wood next to a door and turn it as a latch, but it wears out and becomes loose after a while, other people would buy a $10-$20 metal latch in the store, this also leads back to trowel and error since i would try to modify or fix or improve something like a loose amish latch like that, nd my wooden latches use left over scrap wood so cost nothing but they work far better than the amish ones. i made racks from pallets like oversized bookends, using the same basic concept of an L shaped end and the weight on the lower half holding the vertical one in place, after a few people saw the way i was making them they became very popular in the area since they held wood in measured amounts (4’x8’x16″ 2 rows per rack), off the ground, letting air flow through the stacks and easy to cover, cheap effective solution that nobody else thought of.

      and a little formal education, i attended the SUNY ESF Ranger school and have a degree in forestry, the teachers were old school and i was in the last class some taught before retiring, so i was among the last trained to survey with tapes, or plan roads and trails with drafting boards or sharpen a crosscut saw, now its all computers, pocket computers and air conditioned skidders.

      also a 138 IQ helps, i tend to pick up on things everyone else i know misses (like the aforementioned latch or the pallet racks)

      1. nemoseto,

        Gosh.. 15 miles with 2.5 lb weights on… Now that is some exercise. What kind of bike are you going to get?

        You sound like my dad and brother… Both were making something or another all the time. My dad rebuilt antique airplanes from the ground up. Engine, fabric, everything. He would buy ones that have crashed and rebuild them. My brother didn’t pick up the plane thing, but did the art of making things that work… He does metal things too. Not fancy metal, but utilitarian type things. He’s always inventing something he needs to make his off-grid life better.

        On the oversized bookends. Did you take 2 pallets and nailed them together in an “L” shape? What are the size of the pallets. I think that is a great idea. I don’t have a fireplace or wood stove, but if I did, they would come in handy. And drying the clothes inside in the winter, I’ve heard of that before.

        If you don’t mind my asking, did you say you live in New York? If so, does it get cold there?

        Thanks for taking the time to type out all the information. You are right, old school is best.

        1. not sure of the brnd, its called autostream, its some kind of auto bike (automatic tranny i guess, its 7 speed but automatically shifts gears based on how fast i peddle, like comparring manual cars to automatic cars). normal price was $395 (still one of the cheaper bikes) on sale $275, but all i had was $200, and the guy took that sale, now i only have $7 left to my name but i got sales pending for a lot of stuff.. dropped off my old bike for repairs and expect to have money before its ready.

          most pallets i get are 4’x3′ so i add a spacer like a scrap of 4×4 or some pine firewood in between. holds 2 rows 4’x8’x16″ in ever set made from 4 pallets. nailed scraps at a 45 degree angle to support them too.

          i am on the canadian boarder (less than a 2 hour walk to be in canada, 5 minutes with a car). winters can get -40 F at night january through march with day rarely reaching 0. plus this is the seaway valley so there is a wind tunnel effect with the previling wind having no obsticles. lots of wind farms around here now. and we get snow, one 2 day storm in january dumped 23 inches, not lake effect snow like a little to the west but still a good amount. the boarder is the 45th parrllel so exactly half way between north pole and equater, very few places in the us are further north than this, also 500 miles from nyc but still have to choke on their bs liberl laws

          1. Nemoseto,

            not sure of the brnd, its called autostream, its some kind of auto bike (automatic tranny i guess, its 7 speed but automatically shifts gears based on how fast i peddle, like comparring manual cars to automatic cars).

            I recall seeing those some years ago and a quick search found that they are / were a product of GT, with some additional interesting information on how they work, here: http://www.disraeligears.co.uk/Site/AutoBike_derailleurs.html

            i am on the canadian boarder (less than a 2 hour walk to be in canada, 5 minutes with a car). winters can get -40 F at night january through march with day rarely reaching 0. plus this is the seaway valley so there is a wind tunnel effect with the previling wind having no obsticles. lots of wind farms around here now

            Here in Ohio we get some rather cold winters and those in the south think of us as cold; but, what we get is tame compared to what you and those wlone the northern birder kike Minnesota get regularly.
            Out of curiosity, have you considered adding wind to your energy complement? With all of that wind, a homebrew set of cups (vertical axis) or paddles (horizontal axis with steering) coupled to a vehicle alternator could potentially keep the lights and radios running for a long time.
            Around here most Amish farms have a horizontal axis paddle type connected to a hand pump to keep the water flowing. Here’s an example video that could have been taken just around the bend from my location: 1910 Baker Windmill Pumping Water. Note The off center wheel on top that connects to a rod that moves up & down to make the pump work. Late 19th century technology, easily built, maintained, and still in use today.
            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iHvgpMnyfVk&feature=youtu.be

            the boarder is the 45th parrllel so exactly half way between north pole and equater, very few places in the us are further north than this,

            True with the possible exceptions of Angle, Minnesota, at 49º 23’N. and of course the entire state of Alaska, LOL.

            also 500 miles from nyc but still have to choke on their bs liberl laws

            We aren’t quite as bad as you; but, Columbus, Cincinnati, and Cleveland do often cause us more grief than we would like. For any small town being bullied by the larger population in cities, this should be a shining example of why we have the Electoral College. Tyranny by the masses is not good at any level.

          2. Ohio Prepper, yeah i looked into wind, at my previous place (had a 4 acre lot from 2011 to 2015 then in march 2015 got a 26 acre lot that i am still on) i was on a south facing slope, lots of sun and steady wind, but i was usually broke so i had only the cheapest solar array i could find, and never had generators (long winters reading by candle or oil lamp, whatever what available). i built a couple homemade 12 volt wind turbines from broken 18 volt cordless drills with blocking diodes to control power flow to battery only and used the blades from broken fans, but they always broke after a while. i looked into better turbines but then got my new place which is in a low spot east of a hill and a thick stand of tall white pine and cedar, which block most of the wind to the cabin site, which means no turbines practical, but they also block the wind chill and the snow drifts.

            also looked into vertacle turbines made from oil barrels (i forgot who distribued the designs but they are free online), also tried making bike generators too.

            current setup is a 400 watt array and it keeps 2 marine batteries full even in the worst weather as long as i brush the snow off. all outbuildings have solar and batteries as well and i have 2 generators (little one for battery charging if needed and a big one for the table saw and washer). i am fairly well off now, i have both tractors on 12 volt too with modern alternators replacing the original 6 volt system, i could idle them the charge batteries if need be and the truck too, can’t drive on the road since it needs breaks and registration (used last year then took off road for winter) but i can idle it to use the alternator for power. very little here runs on electric anyway.

  17. Hi everyone! Our biggest, favorite prep last week was getting ready for a visit from the grandkids! (and I suppose, the kids too, LOL!) We had a fantastic weekend, and the kids brought and cooked dinner for us, so I have a new mac and cheese recipe (DD’s recipe was the bomb!), and the extra ribs are in the freezer for a quick and easy meal! DGD is rolling over and trying to scoot, not successful just yet. DGS is a fantastic big brother. He does his own thing, but he spends time with her as well, with no prompting. And, he reads to her! I got him a bunch of books for his Easter basket, and he read to me for a bit, boy that kid is smart for his age!
    I had started some of our peas under lights, planted them along with extra seed for some succession planting. Looking at a potential frost tonight, but think we’ll be okay. Two different varieties of snap peas, as that is what we like. Looking forward to eating fresh off the vine, as well as preserving some. I also scattered some marigold seed, altho it might be a bit early for them. We’ll see. I saved a ton of marigold heads from last year, so if I need to replant, so be it. I have a couple of bean plants that are about ready to be planted, but I think we have one more freeze/frost/snow coming, so I’m hesitant to put them out too soon. Have backups growing as well, so we will live and learn. Tomato seedlings are ready to be repotted, it is way too soon to put them out.
    Went thru the pantry and got rid of some stuff that was outside my comfort zone on ‘use by’ dates and packed up some other stuff to give to one of the kids who’s struggling. Gave me a better picture of what we need. DD who gets WIC gave us some tuna and milk, since they already have a stockpile, and don’t use as much milk as they get. Advised her she could freeze the milk, so it doesn’t go to waste. I’ve never dehydrated milk, but if anyone else has, I would love to hear your experience.
    Made my first loaf of bread with the new bread maker. Kept my nose peeled to the window watching all steps. It turned out well, using their recommended recipe. However, I have learned that I need a good bread knife. I was not able to slice the loaf well enough for sandwiches. It crumbled too much and wouldn’t give a thinner slice. i know the knife I was using was not sharp enough. I want to play with the bread maker more, it even has an option for making jam!
    Congratulations to @PreparedGrammy on the new grand! Aren’t they just precious?
    Happy Belated Birthday @TOP!
    Who doesn’t love @Thor puppy stories! Our beagle has spent many a day looking at the trash when he has totally destroyed a toy that had to be pitched!
    Tara’s questions:
    1)We are big fans of the portable battery operated tools and have many since DH works construction. But we also have the yard tool attachments as well. Since we live on a city size lot, they serve us well. If we lived on a larger property, a good tractor with attachments would be a must. BUT manual tools of all sorts are something we are working on building up. Multipurpose are best.
    2) Yes, I am concerned abought how the midwest floods are going to impact food prices. I’d already decided to expand the garden. We do have local contacts we rely on. And my learning to bake bread is a direct decision based on the flooding.
    3) While we do not forage, I do have some basic ID knowledge. Plantain grows freely around here, altho it has more health properties, I know it’s edible. We have plenty of dandelions around here, and I have day lillies and hostas as well. Never eaten them, but know they are edibles. Foraging is an area I need to learn more about, but do have a guide (Peterson’s, does that sound right? Its’ one of the most recommended)
    4) see above for what we did this week
    Thor’s quesions:
    1) Sad to say, this is a sore spot for us. I had the vehicles well prepped at one point. Because of vehicle fails and DH taking over ‘my’ vehicle for work and me being relegated the ‘only local’ vehicle, that’s all changed. We never leave either vehicle with less than half a tank of gas. But it would take at least 30 mins to an hour to get fully packed. Point we need to work on. That said, we focus more on bugging in. We have a couple of options on bugging out, but they all involve either going thru or skirting major cities.
    2) Lifestraws, several options for treating water, I do have a Brita pitcher, but have found that it doesn’t even compare to true spring water There are a few good brands still left out there.
    3) I have a couple of ‘survival seed vaults’ as well as all the heirloom seeds I buy and save
    4)I have one that needs to be programmed, as well as another that is hand crank
    Have a great week everyone!

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