What I Did to Prep This Week

What I Did To Prep This Week – Week 46: May 26th – June 1st 2019

hay field

Hello Pack. We are dealing with more weird Ohio weather here. Sunny and super hot (like I love it) and then cold enough to think about lighting up the wood stove and… rain. Every time I start to believe that we can stop living on a mud farm, we get another downpour. We haven’t been flooded in for a while, but being stuck on our hill never really bothers me anyway.

We fought through some baling twine issues for a few rows, but did get one hayfield all baled. Of course, we kept looking at the sky trying to beat the rain we weren’t supposed to get – but knew was coming.

Trying to find at least three days without rain in the forecast – which changes nearly by the day, was beyond frustrating. We actually wanted four days so we could do extra raking because the grass was so wet, but that just wasn’t in the cards.

Although we beat the rain and dark by about 20 minutes after seven hours raking a final time and baling, we had to leave about 30 bales worth of grass in the field.

tractors in the field

First, the Massey Ferguson had an axel issue. That was very upsetting to my beloved, but we could hitch a truck to the hay wagon and keep on going. But, about five minutes after the Massey had a problem, the rusty beauty decided she had had enough for the day.

I can’t recall what type tractor the rusty beauty is, other than a really cool old Ford. I think Bobby refers to her as the 8N, but there is a 9N too, so I may be mixing them up. Anyway, worn out from two long days of hard work and a minor carburetor issue, was her diagnosis.

The other cool old Ford, can pull the rake but not the baler, like the rusty beauty can. I am not sure exactly why, but something to do with towing power at a low speed…I think. It seems we are always battling a tractor issue of some sort. But, they are all EMP-proof machines that are easy to work on, find parts for, or manipulate parts for with our forge and/or welder.

There will be more fields and more cuts to our hay baling efforts this year, I am happy that we got in what we did. We are blessed to have enough land on our survival homesteading retreat to be able to grow and harvest enough hay to feed all of our livestock during the winter.

Every year I am strikingly reminded of how much a physically taxing chore baling hay is. Best workout I have hard since high school, is what most of us say each time we don our work gloves and climb aboard the hay wagon.

One nice older gentleman was taken about that Bobby “had” his wife out there baling hay too. He had to laugh at the thought of trying to stop me from helping – or doing about anything else I wanted to do.

Maybe it was my comfortable tie-dyed sundress that threw him off. But, our Amish community, like the pioneer women before them, worked in dresses. I see no need to adorn myself in ugly men’s like clothing to work our land.

horses on forest road

We had a traffic jam on our hill too. Ruby and her herd were not certain I didn’t have any more treats left, and refused to budge as our caravan headed back from the bottom hayfield until they were positive the treat sack was indeed empty.

In other prepping news, we purchased more plants for our garden. I truly prefer to only plant from seeds we have saved and plants we have grown ourselves – the best way to know they have not been contaminated by the biotech industry and their GMO seeds and RoundUp ready chemicals.

But, grocery prices are going sky-high – just like gas did this week. Produce price tags are going nowhere but up for the foreseeable future, so we decided to expand our growing plan.

This Week’s Questions

  1. How are you prepping for the expected grocery store sticker shock?
  2. Have any of your ever baled hay? Hard work, but fun times. Please share your stories.
  3. To all of you lady preppers out there, have you had to deal with even kind-hearted stereotypes about being a self-reliant woman?
  4. What did you do to prep this week?

Tara Dodrill

About Tara Dodrill

Tara Dodrill is a homesteading and survival journalist and author. She lives on a small ranch with her family in Appalachia. She has been both a host and frequent guest on preparedness radio shows. In addition to the publication of her first book, 'Power Grid Down: How to Prepare, Survive, and Thrive after the Lights go Out', Dodrill also travels to offer prepping tips and hands-on training and survival camps and expos.
View all posts by Tara Dodrill →

97 thoughts on “What I Did To Prep This Week – Week 46: May 26th – June 1st 2019

  1. Woah, First today. Early bird gets the worm Thor1…

    Nice weather yesterday, and Friday. Earlier in the week was extremely hot…

    Moved from my storage unit Friday, Thank the Lord. Now a big mess. Boxes on the front porch, totes on the concrete pad, shed is full, and a few totes on the grass. Now to get through it all will take a while and will be selling off what I don’t need/want to keep, and donating other things. At least my stuff is not held hostage anymore.

    Sold a couple of things on eBay and a couple of things at the antique mall where I used to have my booths.

    Garden is doing well with the tomatoes. All the plants have tomatoes on them. The bush beans are coming up, along with a few other things. Need to get out there and stay on top of the grass.

    Comfrey that I took outside to get acclimated to the heat is doing fine, but won’t be able to plant until the fall since it will be in full sun and doesn’t have the root structure for it to make it through the heat of the summer. At least it’s outside instead of inside where my cat tries to get to it. It’s toxic to their liver.

    Looking forward to this coming Saturday, as it’s our group’s Barter Day, and I will be teaching on what kind of honey to buy depending on what you want to use it for. No sense in spending lots of money on Manuka honey when all you want is to sweeten your tea.

    Tara’s questions:

    How are you prepping for the expected grocery store sticker shock? I continue to buy like normal, and want to get some more FD meat and veggies.

    Have any of your ever baled hay? Hard work, but fun times. Please share your stories. I’ve not been the baler, but have certainly been the gatherer…. Hard work, but fun for sure. I used to get hay every year when I had my horses.

    To all of you lady preppers out there, have you had to deal with even kind-hearted stereotypes about being a self-reliant woman? All the time. I tell them, that I have to do what I have to do when I’m the only one doing it. I hire when I have to, knowing my limits of time or strength. I had a pair of jumper cables in my stuff that the box fell apart when it got moved. The guy helping me move asked me if I was going to keep them, studied them, and then asked me how much. I told him that those require relying on another person to help… I said I can’t do that. I went out and got my new battery jumper out of the trunk and showed him what I would do now if my battery was dead… Not my plan, but must be God’s…

    Prayers for the pack, unspoken requests for The President and for America.

    Hope everyone has a great week…

  2. I did my low-carb grocery shopping this week. Added a little to my stash. Did some cooking.

    Been hot and sunny all week. The Florida summer is here. Once it gets into the 90s, it usually stays there for several months to come. A summertime cold snap means temps in the high 80s. Actually, the official temp is taken at the Orlando International Airport and is always lower than around my place. Nearby weather stations posting to the Weather Underground often show temps above 100F. I’ve already seen 100-plus five times so far this week. I’m not complaining, just reporting. I much prefer hot weather to cold. Afterall, I moved here from Michigan, so I’m subjecting myself to this.

    Central Florida is also pretty dry and the powers that be are worried about wildfires (and rightly so). They had two in the Ocala National Forest this week that they were able to keep to a reasonable size. I shouldn’t have any worries about wildfires where I’m at. We did have a little rain Friday evening. Nothing to write home about. Some places north of me got more.

    Tornados sure have been tearing things up in the mid-west. I’m glad nothing came near TOP, Tara, and other pack members when those tornados ripped through the Dayton, OH area. You know it’s bad when they have to call out the snowplows to clear roadways and Interstates of debris. A tornado, especially at night, is probably one of the hardest things to prep for in my estimation.

    Slow prepping week as I had to wait until June to make any purchases. So, I mostly read stuff on prepping and watched some vids. I did order the book, The Hot Zone, for Kindle. It does make for scary reading. The descriptions of people suffering from Ebola are pretty graphic and easy to visualize. Hardly anything involving the human body makes me queasy, but the author’s descriptions are so good, I got queasy. Almost made me stop eating supper. I finished it and the book is definitely a thought provoker. There are some seriously frightening things out there in nature. They can kill you fast and ugly.

    I also watched that mini-series based on the book. I was underwhelmed. There were a lot of problems that bother an old Marine sergeant and detracted from the story. Hair cuts out of regs, not wearing uniform caps when outdoors, cockeyed insignia on uniforms, plus they played fast and loose with story in the book. The female lead was not a full colonel during the real event, she was a LtCol and was promoted sometime after the event (same with her husband). There were other issues too. Plus, the book was much scarier and very descriptive of the suffering Ebola victims endured before death (or survival).

    I still don’t think that hordes of Ebola infected people would be marching out of the cities. It wouldn’t take hordes to spread the Ebola Zaire strain, first of all. Second, a lot of them would be pretty sick and not up to marching anywhere. In the Congo, where the current outbreak is raging, there is an experimental vaccine being used that seems to work well when given pre-infection or even post-infection if given early. Post-infection immunized people still get sick, but not to the full extent and they usually survive. Unfortunately, there are a lot of obstacles in the way. A war, people distrustful of the government, murder of caregivers, preference to use traditional healers, etc. The vaccine is not FDA approved for use in the US yet as technically it is still undergoing human trials (live and in color in the Congo).

    Granddaughter is doing good and is almost always well behaved. Smart little stinker. Yesterday she wanted to play with her stickers but put them all over herself instead of in her sticker book. She had fun.

    Tara’s questions:

    1. How are you prepping for the expected grocery store sticker shock? Not a whole lot I can do, except continue to stock.

    2. Have any of you ever baled hay? Hard work, but fun times. Please share your stories. Never baled hay, but I have done other kinds of farm work, including taking care of pigs, horses, and rabbits. All on a basic level, of course. No real stories, but the pigs were a bit of a pain as they kept trying to escape by rooting under their fence. No surprise there to a pig farmer, I’m sure.

    3. To all of you lady preppers out there, have you had to deal with even kind-hearted stereotypes about being a self-reliant woman? Not a woman, so, no. My Ex has and she does not take it with grace no matter how kind-hearted.

    4. What did you do to prep this week? See above.

    1. Z36, the haircuts were from the 70’s LOL hippies…….

      The point is, someone may not know they are sick until they feel sick. As for spreading the disease, think of someone in an airport (especially an airplane confined space),bus station, grocery store (always wipe the buggy handle)….ect.

      Glad you watched it…..

      1. Thor1,

        Actually it took place in 1989. There were other silly problems, but too numerous to mention.

        I recommend the book if you want a more accurate recitation of the incident. Scarier too.

        1. Z36, yes definitely scary stuff. I think of some unsanitary things I’ve seen in the world.

          Poop in a grocery cart, an illegal alien washing a baby in an apartment complex swimming pool after it pooped its pants…… Gross stuff but it could easily spread diseases.

          1. Typhoid fever is making a come back in Los Angeles, I’m waiting for the Black plague or Black death to start up in Southern California, very scary. Our neighbors found rats in their garage, due to the neighbor between us not mowing her lawn so the neighbor and I got to her front yard mowing and weed whacking is what he did I have a feeling I’ll need to do the backyard, I really hope she does it today. We can’t have rats and ants again I gotta talk to her about keeping up the yard.

          2. mom of three,

            There is an effective vaccine available for Typhoid Fever. Got it in the military several times. I had no side effects from it. There are two kinds, one is oral and the other an injection. Didn’t have the oral version when I was in the military though.

    2. Zulu 3-6,

      Actually, the official temp is taken at the Orlando International Airport and is always lower than around my place.

      This reminds me of an old George Carlin skit, as the ” Hippie Dippy Weatherman” who said that telling the temperature at the airport was stupid, because he knew no one who lived there.
      https://www.google.com/search?ei=9wD0XKSgC4nYsQWH_6rgCg&q=george+carlin+Hippie+Dippie+Weatherman&oq=george+carlin+Hippie+Dippie+Weatherman&gs_l=psy-ab.3..0i10.12638.13716..14418…0.0..0.168.316.0j2……0….1j2..gws-wiz…….0i67j0.T80AbFDXKuo
      Look to about the 1 minute mark.
      It was interesting that when I found this old clip on YouTube an add ran with Tom Steyer asking for help to impeach Trump. A billionaire hedge fund guy, who now thinks that socialism, would be good for the rest of us, now that capitalism has made him wealthy.

      A tornado, especially at night, is probably one of the hardest things to prep for in my estimation.

      True; but this is where modern technology comes in. As an amateur radio operator and trained weather spotter for 40+ years, I have a plan of action. First are the SAME equipped NOAA weather radios that will alert you of watches & warnings, loud enough to wake you in the middle of the night. Then there is the near real-time weather radar (https://radar.weather.gov/radar.php?rid=ILN&product=NCR&overlay=11101111&loop=yes)
      That can help you see where the storms are and where they are headed, and finally the ham radio weather nets, with reports coming from all around the area. The trained weather spotters, mostly hams, are the eyes & ears on the ground for the National Weather Service; but, with the advent of cell phones & social media, anyone can take the free spotter training, and report information to their local NWS office.
      Note that the radar images in the link above are centered on the Wilmington, Ohio NWS office; but, each of you cam find the one that covers your area.

  3. This Week’s Questions

    1. How are you prepping for the expected grocery store sticker shock? Smarter shopping. Close out sales at one grocery here. New WInCo price comparing, weeklt sales, and on-line shopping.

    2. Have any of your ever baled hay? Hard work, but fun times. Please share your stories. No hay bailing.

    3. To all of you lady preppers out there, have you had to deal with even kind-hearted stereotypes about being a self-reliant woman? We keep a pretty low profile, so the DW has only experience positive statements from others.

    4. What did you do to prep this week? Well…Resupplied the camper. O-rings came in so will test the water filter. Grocery shopping for house and camper. Already booked for all of next week (stepping & fetching for others). Had a wire come loose from the AC to DC charger in the trailer; it managed to ground it’s self out and things got hot. We caught it in time and repaired to problem. If we’d waited a day it might have burnt down. Got in my tether cable kit; tethered pins to the front and the key to the generator.

    Mid-week out-of-town shopping: Harbor Freight, Costco, WinCo, Dollar Tree.

    Received: Tether cable kit; misc. medical supplies; misc. USB cables; O-rings for water filter, creamy wheat cereal; pourable brown sugar;

    1. You’ll love Winco, ours has been here three year’s best grocery store to come to our town they have made the other stores drop their prices. The bulk food is great that’s were I buy my tea from Stash and they take manufacturers coupons too.

  4. Puppy is so smart, he tells you what he wants. He looked at the ball gun when he wants to play and up at the leash when he wants to go for a walk….good boy….

    Air-conditioning went down upstairs so I had to sleep in the prepper room downstairs. Thank God I had 2 air-conditioning units in this heat of 96 degrees. Swamp coolers maybe on the prepper list…
    Put in a new blower motor and all is back to normal.

    Garden

    It is truly spectacular. Picked my first cucumber, it was hiding but it was a foot long.
    Beans are coming out and the tomatoes…..cherry look like racks of grapes, baseball sized beef steaks and tons of Roma…… Now if they can only turn red…..

    Gym

    Been working out a lot. Getting buff…….

    Supplements

    D3, magnesium, fish oil, B12 and tumeric. All good for men over 40

    Creatinine and whey protein and blueberries after work outs in smoothies.

    Drinking a gallon of water a day as well is good.

    Water

    Added another water catchment barrel.

    Jeep

    Got extra brush guards and tire cover.
    Another reason to get a Jeep…they look good clean or covered in mud….LOL

    Food

    Been eating a lot of high protein low fat stuff like salads, oatmeal ( using freeze dried bananas and strawberries. Fish, lean steak and chicken. Eggs……

    Tara’s questions.

    1.How are you prepping for the expected grocery store sticker shock?
    2. Have any of your ever baled hay? Hard work, but fun times. Please share your stories.
    3. To all of you lady preppers out there, have you had to deal with even kind-hearted stereotypes about being a self-reliant woman?

    1. Buying sale meat and freeze drying, Growing a garden to supplement.
    2. Hey yes hay no.
    3. Not yet…..LOL

    Thor’s questions:

    1. Do you take supplements for health?
    2. How many times a week do you exercise?
    3. How far do you think you could walk in a day during a crisis?
    4. How long could you stay home during a pandemic?

    1. Thor’s questions:

      1. Do you take supplements for health? I take CoQ10 for the back and flank pain I get from taking statins. I don’t take statins right now, but the back pain is stubborn. I also take glucosamine for my arthritis and it seems to work well for my knees.

      2. How many times a week do you exercise? What’s that? Actually, I do some walking every day, often pushing granddaughter in her stroller or her on foot. She can walk a pretty fair distance for her age before she asks to be carried.

      3. How far do you think you could walk in a day during a crisis? Depends on how much I had to carry. If just a Camelbak 3-liter and my EDC, I could probably make it to my #1 daughter’s house, six-miles away. If my BOB, I could still probably gut it out, but it would take longer. Either way, Ranger Candy will be needed. If I had to carry my BOB, a rifle, and ammo, boy that will be a toughie. I’d have to dig deep for that one. I’d have to cover my feet in moleskin too.

      4. How long could you stay home during a pandemic? Tough to say. Easily six-months in the food department, but unless I was able to fill my WaterBOB, my water supplies may not stretch that long without going outside to fetch more from a nearby lake to filter. Unless the water kept flowing (I’d still filter it).

      1. Zulu 3-6 – we filter our water anyway because I don’t trust the county water department to tell us when there’s a problem. Our cats even get filtered water.

        1. GA Red,

          When I moved into this apartment three years ago, I bought a water test kit and checked it myself. The water passed with flying colors. I still almost exclusively drink bottled water, but I use tap water to cook with. I think it may be time for another test kit just for the heck of it. Around here the local agencies seem pretty good about making boil water alerts when necessary, but one never knows for certain unless you check.

          1. Zulu 3-6 – We use a whole house filter to extend the life of the water heater and as first line defense against anything the county fails to inform us about, even though it doesn’t catch everything. The kitchen has a dual drinking filter. I use that water for most cooking and to fill my Alexapure – that’s the water I generally drink.

    2. Thor:
      1- Multivitamins and a beet supplement. Fiber too.
      2-Do the results of my last PT test in 1994 count? Just kidding. I try but I get bogged down with work. That said, I’ll carve out some time for it.
      3- I’m thinking 15-20 but that would depend on whether there was any escape and evasion involved. Nonetheless, my GHB can get me home.
      4- Quite a while but I’d probably try to escape just for sanity’s sake.

    3. Good question this week Thor.

      1 yes, I make the whole family take vitamins. Hubby. Getting his Vitamins D right now sitting in the sun..

      2.Doing yard work, house work and park far away from stores, to get those extra steps again LOL.

      3. As far as how far a couple of miles, maybe.

      4. I wouldn’t like to stay in the city, we have plans to come out to our other place less people, and more like minded.

      1. MOT, every bit helps, but think about going for short walks with your hubby, it will do you both good and vitamin D is really good for you.

        1. Thor1 – for those of us who burn more easily, sunscreen tends to interfere with the body’s ability to produce natural Vitamin D. I wear sunscreen daily, so I continue to take D3 and get my levels checked annually. My last test was last July and my levels were low enough that my doctor recommended increasing my dosage of D3.

    4. Oh, good questions, Thor!
      1. I take a multi vitamin, garlic, turmeric, a gram of Vitamin C, and Chlorella tablets.
      2. I exercise 5 days a week, rotating workouts to get all muscle groups covered.
      3. With good shoes, I could walk a lonnnnng way. Used to run 15 miles a week, but a broken foot made me give that up. My walking pace is over 4 miles per hour, so with good hydration I would guess I could cover over 20 miles or so, allowing for resting along the way.
      4. With multiple water sources and 4 years worth of food put back, we’re here for the Duration as they say. Self sufficiency has been my main endeavor for over a decade now and we live on 5 acres. Permaculture and seed saving have created a renewing source of food around here.

      1. GL, turmeric is great and may help with preventing cancer. 15 miles a week is good. I used to ride 80 miles a week on a bicycle. The Mrs. Can’t ride a bike right now because of an ACL injury so I haven’t done that for awhile. Just treadmill, exercise bike and dog walks lately. I pulled the bike out of the shed and put air in the tires. She’s got surgery planned but no date yet.Then Thor rides again….. LOL

        1. Having taken the youngest daughter to PT for numerous injuries, I got to watch other patients recover from other injuries and surgeries – knees being high on the list. The exercise bike will be a big part of recover for the ACL, so riding will likely be encouraged. Hopefully, she will get it done sooner rather than later.

    5. Thor’s questions:

      1. Do you take supplements for health?
      Yes, Folic Acid. COQ10, and Krill Oil (Omega 3)
      2. How many times a week do you exercise?
      Every day, up and down the 14 steps to my office at least a dozen times, and workout with the dumbbells, every other day, as recommended by one of my exercise physiologists.
      3. How far do you think you could walk in a day during a crisis?
      It would depend on the weather (cold, heat, and humidity) and the load I had to carry; but, I could probably average 1.5 MPH, which is not a brisk walk, and walk off and on 12 hours so 18-20 miles.
      4. How long could you stay home during a pandemic?
      We could stay here indefinitely since we keep food and medications on hand and often don’t leave the property for 3-5 days in a row, planning our trips to make multiple stops and accomplish a lot per trip. This would for the most part be doable with or without the power grid intact.

  5. Good morning,

    Regarding impending grocery shortages and sticker shock, I expect we’re going to be doing more fishing, hunting, and shellfish gathering this year. My 18 year old DS is going to be learning butchering this summer as he’s a culinary student at our local voc/tech school. I’m going to talk to the people at the slaughterhouse in the next town for him. He’s still going to be working at the restaurant. He is eager to learn these skills and sees the value of them in a post- SHTF situation.

    I’ve emptied a semi truck loaded with hay bales on hot days for Mrs. Overwatch’s mom and stepdad. Those were enough to make me never want a horse, let alone the dozen they had. I absolutely will NEVER pick up a muck fork again either.

    Prepping this week involved the purchase at a LGS of 1000 rounds of Tula arsenal.30 carbine ammo for $139.00 + tax. I’ve also specifically gone to ChinaMart for a stockpile of baby wipes, peanut butter, canned food, and motor oil.

    Expanding my income stream by financing a woman who’s selling high end pocketbooks and the like on the internet. Should see a return in a couple of weeks or so.

    1. Overwatch,

      Regarding the woman selling pocketbooks. Are you certain she’s selling the real deal and not counterfeits? Happens all the time. A lot of money in that.

      I had a cousin whose wife was a private investigator and she specialized in working for the big name companies tracking down counterfeiters and their sellers. She was very good at it. We did a couple of search warrants in my town based on her info and got huge hauls of fake Gucci, Prada, and other big names. And convictions.

      1. She’s going to be legit. You probably know I’m Italian. Archie Bunker said when “you find an honest one, you really got something there”. We discussed the counterfeit issue. She knows the difference and the consequences. Besides, she’s also looking to resell other items and primitives.

  6. Good Mid-morning Y’all,

    It’s been a tough week weather wise with all the heat and no rain. Grass is dry, garden is dry and I’ve been having to water frequently just to keep everything alive! Hoping to get a break in heat this next week. My prayers go out to all those having to deal with tornados, flooding and drought. The weather has certainly been crazy.

    Regarding Tara’s questions this week:
    1. I’ve not been purchasing more than normal, but always looking for sales & bogo’s. Meat it the biggest expense. Guess I’ll just have to forfeit ribeye and opt for chicken.
    2. I have never had to bale hay, or use a muck fork. I must be living a charmed life!
    3. YES – The stereotypes are out there for strong willed women who can work like a man. Being very independent, I have to do things that are sometimes gender specific (male), but what doesn’t kill you makes you stronger, and creates skills and confidence. I do know my limitations. Wish I had more upper body strength.

    Regarding Thor’s questions:

    1. Yes, I take supplements. Multi-vitamins and calcium with vitamin D.
    2. Since April 10th, I have been exercising every day – regardless. I walk 5-6 miles a day.
    3. I would like to think that during a crisis, I could do whatever it takes. In reality, considering weight of a pack, or water and terrain, weather etc. I could do 6-8 miles (more toward the 6 mile limit in heat and humidity).
    4. How long could I remain at home during a pandemic? I truly don’t know. Something to consider after watching hot zone.

    1. Jean,

      It’s been a tough week weather wise with all the heat and no rain. Grass is dry, garden is dry and I’ve been having to water frequently just to keep everything alive!

      I wish I could swap you for some of our weather. Way too much rain here with 7.5 inches from May 1 until today & more than 20 inches since February. It’s still too muddy here to get the garden tilled.

      2. I have never had to bale hay, or use a muck fork. I must be living a charmed life!

      From my perspective, a charmed life would be doing those things with / for your horses and goats. The goats are all now gone, and the two quarter horses have moved on; but, the miniature horse is still here and still has her pony like attitude. We are actually considering another goat as a companion for the horse; but, I think it’s really more for the companionship of the DW

  7. Hi Tara & all,
    Getting a late start since one of my sisters is visiting this weekend from Pennsylvania.

    When Tara states:

    Every time I start to believe that we can stop living on a mud farm, we get another downpour.

    Pretty much the same here; but, it may finally be getting dry enough to get the garden tilled and planted this upcoming week. Of course there was that ½ inch of rain mixed with hail this morning, so who really knows.

    We haven’t been flooded in for a while, but being stuck on our hill never really bothers me anyway.

    Likewise we often go a week or more without leaving the property. That is of course why it’s called a lifestyle.

    Although we beat the rain and dark by about 20 minutes after seven hours raking a final time and baling, we had to leave about 30 bales worth of grass in the field.

    If you are feeding cattle you could just let it all turn into silage; but, for horses, that would of course not be very good. Here on the property there is a silo; but, the neighbor has a system that tightly wraps the bales into an airtight plastic bale and then allows the fermentation to take place in a more easily transportable and manageable form.

    In other prepping news, we purchased more plants for our garden. I truly prefer to only plant from seeds we have saved and plants we have grown ourselves – the best way to know they have not been contaminated by the biotech industry and their GMO seeds and RoundUp ready chemicals.

    I agree on starting your own seeds; but, the plants I purchased at auction were such an inexpensive time and labor saving process they were hard to turn down, and with all of them grown by the local Amish, I suspect GMO and chemicals were nowhere near them.

    Tara’s Questions:
    1. How are you prepping for the expected grocery store sticker shock?
    We are doing nothing special. The freezers are full of beef and other meats & frozen vegetables and we have enough canned goods to live formonths, before hitting the easy to use freeze dried foods, and then the grains that require more work. We also plan to get vegetables from the garden and more gifted from neighbors and relatives.
    2. Have any of your ever baled hay? Hard work, but fun times. Please share your stories.
    It’s been a full 30 years since I baled hay, and it was one of the hardest, hottest, sweatiest, workouts I’ve ever had. At day’s end all you wanted was a hot shower, both to clean the body and clear out the nose & mouth, and then a place to sleep. I think there were a few times I nearly slept standing in the shower and was out cold before hitting the bed. I’m way too old for that now.
    3. To all of you lady preppers out there, have you had to deal with even kind-hearted stereotypes about being a self-reliant woman?
    I’m not a lady prepper; but, the DW was farm raised, and around here the lady folk are expected to chip in. In a farm family, the family farms, young & old, boys & girls, men & women alike.
    4. What did you do to prep this week?
    See below after my questions.

    TOP’s questions
    1. What one piece of modern technology do you use, could do without; but, would like to keep?
    2. In a recent National research council survey, 71% of drivers admit being distracted when they take pictures or texting while driving. Are you one of the 71%?
    • Because of #2, 40 1st responders were killed in 2018, a 60% increase over 2017. In 2019 to date 20 have been killed including 10 LEO’s
    3.

    And for the conspiracy theorists, here’s where you can get the real scoop.
    NTAC – National Threat Assessment Center
    https://www.secretservice.gov/protection/ntac/

    Attention
    For #11 &12 below I still do not need an intervention. We have two sets of 12 outdoor string lights from Harbor Freight. These will be used in the back yard and in the granary; but, will use LED bulbs instead of the cute little unfrosted clear glass decorative incandescent bulbs that came with them. Woot simply had another great deal on something we actually needed, which is often the case.

    This week we acquired and did the following.
    1. Watched ”The weather channels Top 10”. I’ve been watching these documentaries to try and understand weather phenomena, how long they have been occurring (long before the climate change hoax), the possibilities of them touching me, and how to mitigate against those that might. To me, some natural phenomenon are the scariest. See the next item.
    2. Memorial day evening into the next morning saw thunderstorms and tornado activity in Ohio; but, a good 50 miles or more southwest of my location. I did however; assist Grammyprepper by email in getting her weather radio working, after the storm was over; but, hopefully in time for any other inclement weather. By now many of you know that the Dayton Ohio metro area was hit rather badly.
    3. During #2 above we received another 1.5 inches of rain. We may never get that garden tilled and planted. Arrrgh!!!
    4. Presented a preparedness seminar to our county EMA. We have a lot of new members, and they need to be able to have the kit on hand to be safe @ home; but, more importantly, to leave their families safe @ home while deployed to events and other agencies we support. Our EMA has loaned a 500KW diesel turbine generator to the Dayton area for the time being. It is a regional resource we keep on hand; but, have to share when needed elsewhere within the region.
    5. My 1st negative prep in a while. We normally get more eggs than we can eat and trade or donate them to friends and neighbors; but, the girls are molting again and we only got 3 eggs all week. We have quite a few banked, so this too will pass.
    6. 4 additional plastic T-Posts from Rural King for the garden that will be used to manage climbing plants like peas
    7. 2 more Turbo Torch butane torches from Rural King
    8. A dozen blueberry muffins from Aldi’s
    9. Two pack of pop up LED lanterns from Aldi’s. Knockoffs of the Atomic Beam lantern that were $19.95 & free shipping, these are identical except for the color of the plastic and were only $10.00. These may be found in Bam Bam’s lollygag aisle.
    10. 4 cans peas from Aldi’s
    11. Received a 16 pack of Non-Dimmable 800 Lumen, 8W LED Bulbs (Cool white) from woot.com
    12. Received a 16 pack of Non-Dimmable 800 Lumen, 8W LED Bulbs (daylight) from woot.com
    13. Received a USB to SATA cable to more easily use the 240 GB SSD storage I recently received.
    14. Last week we purchased 12, 32 inch bamboo skewers and this week we used some of them to anchor tomato plants in their pots until they can be transplanted into the garden.
    15. On Friday afternoon, our 55: HDTV in the living room simply quit working. We have a 20 year old 32” LED HDTV we put in it’s place; but, once again, woot seems to be able to read our needs, so we just ordered a 50” TCL 4K UHD HDR Roku Smart LED TV for less than $300.00 including tax.
    16. The DW ordered a Greater Goods Blood Pressure Monitor Kit for the FAK from woot. This required use of the app, that I cannot use due to vision issues, so she placed the order.
    17. Someone pointed out an interesting article about the EMP threat.

    Trump signs executive order to make America greater than EMPs

    • It has the following editorial subtitle: “Order combines hardening against mythical high-altitude attack with space weather readiness and may be found here: https://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2019/03/trump-signs-executive-order-to-make-america-resilient-to-emps/?utm_source=Sailthru&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=ebb%2028.03.19&utm_term=Editorial%20-%20Military%20-%20Early%20Bird%20Brief
    18. Purchased another Airsoft pistol and 2000 rounds of 6 mm ammunition from Dollar General. The guy actually carded me to see if this old greybeard was over 21. That may be a compliment to the ladies; but, a bit of overstepping stupidity for me.

    1. TOP’s questions

      1. What one piece of modern technology do you use, could do without; but, would like to keep? My television. I don’t watch it terribly often except for Jeopardy, college football, and sometimes hockey (if the Red Wings are playing). I can get by without it.

      2. In a recent National research council survey, 71% of drivers admit being distracted when they take pictures or texting while driving. Are you one of the 71%? No, I am not. Orlando area traffic is suicidal enough without adding texting to the mix.

      1. Zulu 3-6,
        What brought up question #1 was a simple occurrence a few months ago while thinking about a topic for one of my ham radio nets, when it was my turn to run the net.
        I was watching TV when the phone (our landline) rang, so I paused the TV, answered the phone from my recliner with the cordless handset sitting next to the chair, finished the call, hung up the phone, and started the show where I had paused it.
        I have a cordless phone, pausable and restartable color HDTV? When I first started watching TV, B&W and two channels, in the 1950’s such things would have been way too futuristic; but, are now commonplace.

        My piece of kit would be the DVR (Digital Video Recorder) that capture shows I want to watch and allows me to watch them at my leisure. I could do without one; but, would really miss it.

    2. Number 18, thanks for the laugh that is so stupid…. Hubby, wants an air soft gun, we haven’t looked but that’s the next fun toy he wants….

      1. mom of three,

        DG is discontinuing selling those guns, so if they have them there where you are, you might want to go ahead and get one, or two, or three. I found them at one DG near me, but not another one. And am still trying to find one that has the ammo.

        TOP,

        They could possibly video the cashiers and would be why they would ask even though it’s clear that someone is of age. Or they may have to type in the DOB into the register like store have to do for alcohol and cigarette purchases. I didn’t pay attention to what the cashier did with my information when I bought my pistols.

        1. Almost There,

          They could possibly video the cashiers and would be why they would ask even though it’s clear that someone is of age. Or they may have to type in the DOB into the register like store have to do for alcohol and cigarette purchases. I didn’t pay attention to what the cashier did with my information when I bought my pistols.

          This was my second, and for the first, the lady didn’t ask anything. This was a younger guy who maybe follows the rules better. I saw no camera; but, I guess I could be that secret shopper guy, trying to catch him. LOL
          And you mentioned pistols, as in more than one. You go girl. Now you only need some more ammo. LOL.

      2. mom of three,

        Hubby, wants an air soft gun, we haven’t looked but that’s the next fun toy he wants

        Tara mentioned them a few weeks back and we purchased one with 1000 rounds of ammo; but, I decided I needed another, as much for the spare removable magazine as anything, and got another 2000 rounds of ammo at the same time.
        It’s been fund to shoot and at around $7.00 for the gun and $5.00 for 1000 rounds, it’s a cheap and fun toy to play with.

    3. TOPs Q&A

      1. That’s a tough one, freeze dryer, solar generator , Jeep, firearms… Wouldn’t want to walk if I could ride….but self-defense would rule.

      2. I have a dash camera…….. Its auto auto….LOL

      1. Thor1,

        1. That’s a tough one, freeze dryer, solar generator , Jeep, firearms… Wouldn’t want to walk if I could ride….but self-defense would rule.

        I don’t really think of firearms as modern technology, since they have been around since around 1288, with even the venerable 1911 prototype being available in the 1880’s;but, I asked and you answered. It will be good to see perspectives of other sand what each thinks is important, since this could easily school all of us toward something we hadn’t thought of.

        1. TOP, the piece of modern technology that you would miss the most is a pacemaker. Although you couldn’t do without it, so what else would you try to keep? SW radio? It depends on the crisis does it not?

          1. Thor1,

            TOP, the piece of modern technology that you would miss the most is a pacemaker. Although you couldn’t do without it, so what else would you try to keep?

            My premise was that you could do without; but, would miss. At this point I cannot do without the PM; but, hat’s only a partially true assertion. I have the pacemaker for the same reason some people have a pickup truck. A horse would work; but, since the truck is available, it’s a better solution. I really didn’t need the pacemaker; but, it makes life a lot easier and allows this old body to accomplish more things. If they had never been invented, I would still get around; but, just a lot more slowly and with more and longer breaks.

            SW radio? It depends on the crisis does it not?

            Indeed it does, which is why we prep and why we have backups for each required function, from heating to water to lighting, etc.

  8. I grew up on the farm, I was 10 when my parents bought the farm they still live there 40 years later. We raised Milking Short horn, a Beautiful and gentle breed even the boys we had a wonderful bull named Joe, who was a sweetie. Dad, bought hay so we did have to buck it in the barn, each year that was hard work. We had a garden, and lots of Raspberries, I still can’t believe dad pulled them out I guess he was tired of cutting back the canes each year. I raised 4 wether lambs, in high school for auction it really taught me about life and death in my young age. We all had to work so we didn’t have much stereotypes, if we did I never saw it. I wish I could have given my kids the same childhood I had.

    As far as what I did this week not much of shopping, that will be next week though I did get the kitty her soft food, I did a lot of yard work, and gave all my plants, and the berries, a good drink of Worm juice, an ounce of juice in a two gallon container, get those berries growing big. We have been still working on our other place this coming week I’ll be using kiltz to paint the bunk house, and get it ready to put insulation in and sheet rock it hubby, all ready did the electrical wiring, so we can button this place up after it sitting for 35 years, we have a friend that will re roof its getting to the point we will start having leaking problems. We also are going to do one side of the yard putting up 5 fence panels, we just have to decide what fence panels to buy and get rock, concrete, and paint to do the fence post to help them not rot to fast. Well, that’s it for another week hoping for another good week of weather and hard work getting stuff done only 15 days left of school, the kiddos are ready to be out.

  9. Good week week of food storage preps this week. Made tomato sauce with 10 pounds of tomatoes from the garden and I have at least that much more ripening now. It sure takes a lot of tomatoes to make sauce! Made more cowboy candy ( 8 eight-ounce jars), using up 2 pounds of my fresh-picked jalapeños. Used some of the spicy sauce on some grilled chicken and liked it a lot. Dehydrated sliced bananas from my plants; harvested more wild elderberries and dehydrated them, too. One of my Seminole Pumpkin vines from last summer made it through the “winter”, and has produced over a dozen pumpkins so far. I will be trying my hand at pumpkin butter with those soon. Grape vines are hanging heavy with fruit this year. Since I’ve got a few cases of wine aging from last year, I’ll be making jelly with this year’s crop. It’s a bountiful year for my little farm and I am thankful!

    1. GL, did you Blanche the tomatoes to get the skin off? You can take the skin and dehydrate it then put it in a coffee grinder to make tomato powder that can be turned into tomato paste with equal amounts of water.

      Good for sloppy joes or pizza…..😀

      1. Thor1, I actually used my veggie attachment for the Kitchenaid mixer to remove both the skin and the seeds before cooking the sauce. So….I fed it all back to my chickens since 90% of the tomatoes were “volunteers” that arose from their poop this spring! Talk about Recycling! LOL

        1. Goatlover,

          I actually used my veggie attachment for the Kitchenaid mixer to remove both the skin and the seeds before cooking the sauce.

          We have that mixer; but, don’t have the veggie attachment. For this process we use a Victorio strainer. Were the tomatoes by chance Roma’s?
          Those are the ones we like to use; but, any volunteers that lesson the work load would be a welcome visitor.

  10. Not buying more than normal groceries. Of course, there is something fundamentally wrong with two people who need three refrigerators and two large freezers to store their stuff!

    Never baled hay. We did make haystacks. Also spent a lot of time working for others, loading hay bales, putting them in the barn, etc. I am soooo glad I don’t have to do that any more!

    Got another 1911 at a good price, planted more garden.
    Off tomorrow on a 2 week road trip. Family reunion at the lodge in Guntersville park in
    Alabama next weekend. Then two days at Orange Beach with kids & grandson.

    1. Billy T,

      I guess a bunch of us are fundamentally warped!!! Lol.. 🙂

      Bring your bug spray. The skeeters are horrendous here in the Deep South.

    2. Billy T,

      Of course, there is something fundamentally wrong with two people who need three refrigerators and two large freezers to store their stuff!

      I agree. We get along with only 2 refrigerators and a large freezer, plus the freeze dryer, dehydrator, and many cases of long term food in #10 cans. LOL.
      Personally I see no problem with either scenario if the equipment and food were acquired legally and if when I’m gone the kids have to clean everything out or we have to use them, then those resources did their required function.
      On my last day breathing I don’t think I’ll be concentrating on all of those homeowner insurance premiums I paid that were wasted, by having no fire, hail , or other damage..

        1. AT,

          I do. One Navajo code talker was buried just this past week. The Marine Corps keeps careful track of them and makes certain they get appropriate honors.

          1. Oh, that Marine was from the FIRST group recruited. They are the guys who developed the code within the Navajo language that was used. More Navajos were recruited afterward and those are the ones still alive.

          2. Z36,

            Yes, I guess there were different groups, and even different tribes. I am glad they are keeping track of them all. 🙂 I wish my dad could have reunited with some of the folks from his days in the military. He was a loner and only had a couple of Veteran friends that we were aware of.

      1. Zulu 3-6,

        There are still some Navajo code talkers still alive. Not many.

        I saw a history channel documentary on the code talkers. Since the language was only an oral tradition, with nothing written down, few people outside of the Navajo nation understood or even knew of the language.
        I recall that the Japanese captured a Navajo who was of no used to them, since he didn’t know the code, which was on top of the language. Turtle for instance meant tank and various birds represented various types of aircraft. For an understanding of the history of these patriots, you can read: Codemakers: History of the Navajo Code Talkers
        https://www.historynet.com/world-war-ii-navajo-code-talkers.htm

        1. TOP,

          The Navajo Code Talkers are very well known in the Marine Corps. Now. For many years what they did was classified and they didn’t talk about it. I knew about them when I was a teenager as my dad told me about them. His scout-sniper platoon was assigned to regimental HQ and there were several code talkers there too, working in the comm shack. He met them and found them quite personable with a good sense of humor. They thought the Japanese were funny too because sometimes the Japanese would cut into their phone lines or radio frequencies and curse them out in English. They just cussed back in Navajo.

          1. Zulu 3-6,

            His scout-sniper platoon was assigned to regimental HQ and there were several code talkers there too, working in the comm shack. He met them and found them quite personable with a good sense of humor. They thought the Japanese were funny too because sometimes the Japanese would cut into their phone lines or radio frequencies and curse them out in English. They just cussed back in Navajo.

            That is cool to have sort of met one of them, even once removed through your dad. I’m not generally awe struck by many people, especially those on TV or who play sports; but, there are some people I would love to meet or to have met. Those code talkers would be one of them, along with perhaps little known but substantial people like Thomas Sowell, Walter Williams, and John Bolton.
            As a kid I got to meet and talk with Roberto Clemente; but, the encounter left me thinking how dumb he was, at least for the circumstance where I was involved.

          2. TOP,

            I would love to meet Walter Williams or Thomas Sowell. Bolton would be OK. I have met some “famous” people. I met Senator Carl Levin of Michigan once and I thought he looked cheesy in the cheap suit he was wearing. I met his brother, Sander, who was a Congressman, and he was a better dresser. But they were both flaming libs, so I was not in awe. I once met Governor George Romney of Michigan (father of Mitt Romney). He was nice to me (I was a young teen then), so that’s something I guess. Met Mitt too at the same time. I saw President Reagan once from a rooftop with Secret Service counter-snipers, but I don’t think that counts.

            I’ve met assorted mayors, council people, state reps and senators (arrested one state senator for gross indecency between males). Helped arrest an MBA pitcher who was being a drunken a-hole. A bunch of general officers, one of whom I had coffee in his office with once or twice a week as I delivered a crime report on something, and another I told to “get f-” and got away with it.

            Never met a code talker either and would have liked to.

          3. Zulu 3-6,

            Just lost another Navajo code talker yesterday. 96-years old.

            In a similar vein, I saw a short interview with a 93 year old guy who will be jumping with the 75th D-Day anniversary jump.
            He was one of the airborne who jumped on the original assault.
            I assume he’ll be jumping tandem; but, that’s still quite a feat at his age.

          4. It just happens the veteran is from a nearby city and the man who is jumping with him has a sky diving school in my small town. The big city TV station has a reporter following the story so we get first hand interviews with both the vet and the jump master. We got the inside story and personal interviews, makes it even more real.

            As a navy veteran ( destroyer engine rooms 1972-78) I have a special interest in the Naval force but all stories are poignant.

      1. Thor1,

        AT, that looks easier than a rapid maul.

        Hmmm. Didn’t one of your questions ask about getting exercise?
        That maul is a perfect way to do it and not waste time and effort just exercising. Multitasking is the watch word. LOL

  11. With just my wife and me I do not make a great effort to save money on food. I scrimped for years and now I just buy high quality ingredients and what I think might taste good. My wife’s expanding waist line proves I am doing that right. We live in a poor county so prices are reasonable specially now that we have 40% more than an average income. I do shop sales and visit each store for their specials, Walmart for canned goods, my neighborhood grocery store for their meat specials, and the local vegatable stand for produce.

    While we did have cows we id not use hay. My dad did grow and store field corn so we got the pleasure of helping grind it for feed. Imagine a 70 hp tractor at full throttle under a shed in August. Along with the radiator heat there was the diesel exhaust fumes and clouds of corn dust propelled by the roaring fan the blasted the ground corn into burlap bags. Not a fun job to be hanging and removing those pours bags with the hot air and fine dust pushing out between the bag fibers. At least we were treated to a trip to the lake for a swim. I will not bore you with tales of digging potatoes in muddy, weed infested fields in June with workout equipment. Today huge four row harvesters with hedgehog weed and soil elimination belts are driven through the fields by four wheel drive tractors with air conditioned cabs and the field wagons puled by the same size tractors. We used worn out two ton trucks that roasted you with heat and fumes through the rusted out floorboards and constantly needed pulling out from boggy places. Sometimes we had a pull tractor hooked to the harvester tractor and one to the truck just to get through the field. Kids today do not know about hard work :).

    My wife has allergys and asthma so outside work is not her thing. My mother rarely helped on the farm except to have big dinners for us. She did busy herself planting the ends when we were planting potatoes and rode on the harvester tossing off weeds and roots during harvest. Cute tale, one day my dad had my four year old niece in our new tractor’s cab hooked to the harvester. My brother was driving the field truck beside the harvester. My mother was out on the dusty machine working hard. My niece watched for a while and the said, “Grandpa, why doesn’t Granny have a little house?”

    Hot and dry in north Florida. We had about an inch of rain last week, it was dry again by morning. The storm knocked out power to my community for 9 hours. Strongly thinking of a bigger, duel fuel generator paired with a large propane tank. I only use 40 gals of propane a year for my stove plus a couple of 20 lb cylinders for my grill but mostly useless items that are lifesavers when you need them are called preps for a reason.

    I do not handle heat well so I hide inside until the sun goes behind the trees before doing my gardening. Mostly now all I do is water my strawberries and tomatoes and then pick some of the tomatoes. My grape tomatoes are in full production, I finally got it right. Same thing for my okra, wide bushes with 8 inch wide leaves. The pods are thick and sweet when fried. I must have got some special seed. The pack says Emerald, I also planted Clemson spineless. If I try to save some seed do they cross pollinate?

    My melons and cucumbers are starting to flower but my bee hive seems to be deserted. I hope the beekeeper brings some more bees out.

    I think Zulu and I can have a granddaughter competition. They are the same age, she will be three on labor Day. As my only grandchild she gets all the attention. She is also a bright stinker, emphasis on stinker. Last week she got suspended from daycare, she slugged the teacher. This child does not like to wear shoes, the state inspectors were there and all children must were shoes so the teacher was trying to get hers on. First she tossed one across the room, when the teacher tried to put the other one on then came the slap. The other day my wife had to go pick her up because she was in a fight with another child. Not slapping and pulling but MMA knock down. Her dad plays fighting video games and she remembers everything she sees and hears. My daughter is about to the end of her rope. Other times she is sweet as can be. For our joint birthday celebration my oldest daughter (our birthdays are twenty years and two days apart) drove up from Orlando and stayed a few days with her sister. When she went home my granddaughter ask her mother where was her best friend.

    1. Daddio7,

      Thank goodness my young lady is not a hitter. I’m her daycare. I’ve never had cause to spank her for any reason (I’m not afraid to do it, if warranted). She also prefers to go bare footed, but doesn’t fight getting her shoes on if its for a good reason. In fact, depending on the pair of shoes, she sometimes puts her own on.

      She is an extremely well behaved child, its almost scary to me 🙂 She will start pre-school in the fall, two mornings a week. We’ll see what happens.

      Children are very observant and will copy adult actions and words.

    2. Daddio, yes, different varieties of okra( and this is true of other plants) will cross pollinate. Thats how hybridizers get new varieties, sometimes. One is supposed to plant different members of such families as Cucurbits(cukes and squash) a certain large number of feet from each other to prevent cross pollination, but i dont have the room, so i merely stagger the planting dates, in hopes that their bloom times will be different.

  12. OMG, I’m trying to loose weight and my wife was watching carnival eats on TV.

    1. A deep fried banana split. (Hint freeze the banana.)

    2. Dynamite dog…… Hotdog in a egg roll rapper with cream cheese and jalapeños and deep fried…

    The deep fryer is going to get used next weekend….. Mmmmm

    Who thinks of this stuff?

  13. I like the questions – they help me think about some things that I might not otherwise.

    Tara’s Questions:

    1. How are you prepping for the expected grocery store sticker shock? The garden got expanded and I continue to rotate the stock on the shelves, adding extra when I can.
    2. Have any of your ever baled hay? Hard work, but fun times. Please share your stories. No but I have been mulching our garden and yard with wood chips. The DH gets a load of chips in the bucket on the tractor and gets as close as he can to the area in the garden it’s going. Then I load a wheel barrow to spread it. I did that for about 6 hours yesterday. I did it for about 3 hours each on two separate days last weekend. I still have about half the garden to finish too, so once we get more wood chips, I’ll have about 6 more hours of work to finish it. I have also helped frame up a building or two, along with other carpentry work over the years. I do enjoy being physically active doing something productive.
    3. To all of you lady preppers out there, have you had to deal with even kind-hearted stereotypes about being a self-reliant woman? The only comment I’ve really had was from our neighbor in his 80s when I was cutting the grass. I just told him I enjoy doing it (which I do when I have time). Of course, he has been paying someone to maintain his yard the entire time we’ve lived there. I grew up with a mother that did a lot of yard work. I also knew a woman that would till the farm fields during the day when she and her husband were share-cropping so her husband could run the tractor at night. She had beautiful skin too because she wore a hat, a long-sleeved shirt, pants and gloves to protect her skin. She also used olive oil as a moisturizer. Amazing woman and way before her time – first person I ever knew that did yoga and this was in the 1970s.
    4. What did you do to prep this week? Lots of work in the garden trying to keep it alive and help it grow.

    Thor’s questions:

    1. Do you take supplements for health? Yes – D3, CoQ-10, Fish Oil, Eye vitamins, Biotin, Melatonin, Elderberry gummies, Metamucil, Airborne gummies and Iodine. I think that’s it. Some are daily and some are only twice a week.
    2. How many times a week do you exercise? Depends on the time of year and what you consider exercise. I spent 6 hours working in the yard yesterday and got 249 active minutes. About once a week, I ride my bike to go out to dinner (about 9 miles round trip) – depending on the weather – not too hot, not too humid, not too cold and not too wet. During the summer, exercise is typically outside doing physical labor on weekends. During the winter, I have a stationary bike and access to a treadmill, plus a great area for walking or running outside – I try to exercise 3-5 times a week then.
    3. How far do you think you could walk in a day during a crisis? 10-15 miles if necessary depending on the terrain and available shoes.
    4. How long could you stay home during a pandemic? I’d be pretty happy if I could stay home now on a continual basis, so probably 3 months, which is when I’d likely start running out of some foods. I think the DH would get stir crazy before I would but I also think our house would be the cleanest and most organized ever.

  14. I haven’t posted in a while but my preps have been on going over the past months. Thankfully I am at the point where I can wait until sales or coupons are available to add to my stockpiles. During the “recession” in the late 70’s the only job I could find was bailing hay. It was the worst job I ever had. The heat, dust, and long hours were terrible and I hope to ever have to do that again.

    My garden is planted and my tomatoes and peppers are growing and soon will be producing. Three months ago I started a Jujitsu class and I am slowing moving up in rank. I have been fishing and have about 40lbs of fresh fish in the freezer and during hunting season I bagged a 22lb turkey. I have been foraging on public property and in my back yard and have found over 20lbs of morel mushrooms. I planted 2 apple trees and one peach tree.

    1. Hi Richard,

      Welcome back. Sounds like you have been busy. I don’t have any fish in my freezer. I’ve heard of people canning it. I wonder how it would taste canned.

    2. Richard Pratt,

      Thankfully I am at the point where I can wait until sales or coupons are available to add to my stockpiles.

      We are there also and it’s a great place to be; however, it took years to be in this position, so those not there yet should just have patience and keep plowing ahead, one small step at a time.

      During the “recession” in the late 70’s the only job I could find was bailing hay. It was the worst job I ever had. The heat, dust, and long hours were terrible and I hope to ever have to do that again.

      I baled hay with an uncle a few times growing up, and as a favor to some friends who were trying to beat the rain and needed the extra help. This was in my teens and 20’s and something that was a good experience, to have had for perspective; but, I’m in no shape to do it now.
      Around here the baling has gotten more automated with equipment that bales the wind rows and kicks the bales into a wagon with no humans involved, or equipment to make the large square or round bales.

      Three months ago I started a Jujitsu class and I am slowing moving up in rank.

      Good for you. I’ve studied various martial arts since age 14 and at the very least it will build confidence and get you some exercise.

      I have been foraging on public property and in my back yard and have found over 20lbs of morel mushrooms. I planted 2 apple trees and one peach tree.

      This seems to be the year for Morel’s since I’m seeing and hearing from many who have found them. I think this warrants a good search of our property, keeping our fingers crossed.
      We’ve planted apples, peaches, and cherries; but, they take a long time to produce fruit, so we’re looking for some larger trees to plant this summer / autumn.

  15. Always late to the party, so here we go!
    Tara’s ?:
    1) I’ve been ‘preaching’ about the rising prices. We are working our way through our freezer, and getting ready to make a bulk purchase from our local butcher hopefully before prices rise. I really wanted to expand the garden this year for this exact reason, but as we are looking at moving, I did not plant as much as I wanted.
    2) I’ve never baled hay
    3) Never ever tell me I can’t do anything just cuz I’m a woman…NEVER! And if you are condescending to me, well I will just shut you up!
    Thor’s ?:
    1) I take a multivitamin but have d3 and k2, as well as glucosamine/chondroitin on hand, still working out how to incorporate them as I don’t eat a ‘normal’ diet/regimen (I often only eat one meal/day and so it makes it difficult to ‘time’ taking vitamins/supplements)
    2) I don’t exercise, I have a pretty physical job. I have a pretty decent set of ‘guns’ for a woman my age. I am well aware I should exercise more. My endurance is not what it should be.
    TOP’s Q)
    1) I would miss but could live without the internet. I am way more connected than I want to be, but I could live without it. I still remember how to find a library book by the dewey decimal system. I am not proficient, but can read a basic map.
    2) Nope. I don’t touch my phone while driving. Family and friends know so. I also don’t answer my phone while I am interacting with store employees (one of my pet peeves…you want me to take care of you, you want my undivided attention, is it too much to ask for yours?)

    As for WWDYTPTW, not much. Mostly replaced stuff we used, as well as mentioned above, trying to work through the freezer stores. I got the weekend off (not requested) and I did a whole lot of nothing, other than cooking and cleaning.

    1. Grammyprepper,

      I really wanted to expand the garden this year for this exact reason, but as we are looking at moving, I did not plant as much as I wanted.

      You got a garden planted?
      We still are not dry enough to till the garden; but, are hopegul (once again) for this upcoming week.

      Never ever tell me I can’t do anything just cuz I’m a woman…NEVER! And if you are condescending to me, well I will just shut you up!

      Really? After spending time with you and the DH a few times, I would never have guessed. LOL,

      I don’t exercise, I have a pretty physical job. I have a pretty decent set of ‘guns’ for a woman my age. I am well aware I should exercise more. My endurance is not what it should be.

      A woman your age? Well kid, it’s never too late to have a few more.

      I would miss but could live without the internet. I am way more connected than I want to be, but I could live without it. I still remember how to find a library book by the dewey decimal system. I am not proficient, but can read a basic map.

      I can also use the Dewey decimal system; but, do modern libraries even still have physical card catalogs?
      As for the internet, I’ll admit I really use it; but, I’m not really addicted, as in smart phone or tablet glued to my face.

      Nope. I don’t touch my phone while driving. Family and friends know so. I also don’t answer my phone while I am interacting with store employees (one of my pet peeves…you want me to take care of you, you want my undivided attention, is it too much to ask for yours?)

      Undivided attention? Does that even exist anymore, in our everyone thinks they can multitask society.
      I agree with your sentiments,. You ask me a question and get distracted or walk away while I’m explaining, and I’ll also walk away, and you just stay ignorant.

      1. TOP,

        I haven’t been in a library over the past ten years that had a physical card catalog anymore. Even the hick county I used to live in. I took my kids to the library all of the time. It stuck on the girls, but not with my son, sad to say. #1 daughter takes granddaughter to the library frequently for story time and to introduce her to what a library is and what you can do there. The baby loves books now, so I think it will stick with her too.

        1. Zulu 3-6,

          I haven’t been in a library over the past ten years that had a physical card catalog anymore. Even the hick county I used to live in. I took my kids to the library all of the time.

          It’s pretty much the same here. Even our little libraries are part of a library network where you can check for items in the local library, or order them from the network, with an email or text message when the item is available. Everything has both a UPS label and an RFID chip; so you can self checkout with a large mailbox style box for returns at any time or day.

          It stuck on the girls, but not with my son, sad to say. #1 daughter takes granddaughter to the library frequently for story time and to introduce her to what a library is and what you can do there. The baby loves books now, so I think it will stick with her too.

          We started with the ZooBooks in her own name, and later Kids Discover magazine. She still reads all of the time and finds it enjoyable. I think it helped that she was a girl, so no peer pressure for playing the latest games, and games back then were consoles and not the portable things every kid now seems to have along with their cell phone that compete with already limited time.

          1. TOP,

            Granddaughter already knows how to play video games on a console or her dad’s iPhone. Of course, they are age appropriate and educational type games. Her parents do not play violent games in her presence, not that they really interested #1 daughter that much. But her dad is a video game nut.

          2. Zulu 3-6,

            Her parents do not play violent games in her presence, not that they really interested #1 daughter that much. But her dad is a video game nut.

            I played some video games in college at the arcades; but, those were things like Missile Command, Pac Man, and Dig Dug.
            The first video game I owned was built from discrete components (IC’s) from a schematic in a magazine and allowed me to play PONG on the TV. Building it and getting it to work was really more of the challenge than playing the game.
            One of my favorites for the PC was / is a pinball machine collection that’s still kind of fun to play; but, requires an old windows version.
            I received an Atari Flashback 2 for Christmas last year and have not yet had time to set it up and play with it. It may not get much action until the fall or winter when we begin to hibernate more inside.
            I have friends who would play the 1st person shooters; but, I was never interested in those, since we did some of the tactical shooting in the back yard with reeal guns, going back to when the boys were teens.

  16. 1.How are you prepping for the expected grocery store sticker shock?
    I bought some meat on sale this week, my husband thought I had spent too much on the ribs until we were cutting them up. Ended up with 8 family servings out of them. (We have a family of 4).
    2. Have any of your ever baled hay? Hard work, but fun times. Please share your stories.
    I use to help my dad cut hay at my grandparent’s place. When raking it, Granddad had one of the old fashioned rakes with the seat. Dad would drive the tractor, and I would pull the rake handle when putting in rows. After a couple of days drying, we would go out and use pitch forks to gather it up and haul it in. Also helped an aunt and uncle with their baling, loading and putting the bales up in the barn loft. We did it all by hand. Yes, hard, hot work!
    3. To all of you lady preppers out there, have you had to deal with even kind-hearted stereotypes about being a self-reliant woman?
    Yes, I have! A former co-worker and I always joked we should have been born men. I was always leaving work at the end of the day in winter, just to make it to the bottom of our hill and put tire chains on by myself in the dark. Then the next morning, get to the bottom of the hill and take them off again. I have had men and offer to help, then ended up teaching them how as they kept trying to put them on wrong! Also taught a neighbor how to put his on. His dad taught him and he kept losing them.
    4. What did you do to prep this week?
    We prepped by building a new duck house, moving some leftover building materials, and making room to cut down some dead trees on our place that, if they fall, will take out a couple of our vehicles. We already had a good tree fall in that area (rain washed out the root support), that took out 3 other good trees with it. We were lucky they fell into the woods. We have had a lot of rain here in WV too! At least we have a start of fire wood for winter!
    We also finished getting our garden plants in the ground. We have different greens coming up, and potatoes and tomatoes doing well. Our Blueberry bushes are looking better than they had been.
    We have been blessed with good deals in our area. We need all the help we can get. I lost my job in March and haven’t found another yet. Today is our kid’s last day of school, so they will be around more to help out.

  17. 1)sticker shock from the grocery store? I am trying Leon’s bucket gardening due to low usage of water. My sister has her garden in, which we can get vegetables out of when they are ready. Thanks baby sis!
    2)We never raised hay on the old ranch due to lack of water, but as a teenager helped my parents load it up out of the fields. Back breaking work, and always on the hottest day, do not miss those days.
    3)My/our oldest sibling has a hard time with the youngest & myself being so self reliant. She does not understand our mind set, but we were raised differently than her(city), we are raised country.
    Baby sister and I just tell folks, dad ran out of boys so he put us girls to work as if we were boys. Yes, we have had funny looks but we are serious and funny at the same time. Only one boy from his first marriage who was long gone by the time our mother married baby sisters dad.

    My buckets are ready with all the necessary materials for gardening Then mother nature decided to turn on the blast furnace from cool to melting hot!!

    Removing all the items we do not need in the house during hot dry summers in our area. The items go into a storage unit a ways from our place. Especially when one has 7-8 containers of sewing material with all the fixings, and no time in the summer to sew. Same with the books we like to preserve, hard to replace due to lack of availability. Records(not LP’s), genealogy research still in the house and the small keepsakes have not given to the next generation.

    Purchased whole chickens on sale to be cut up, tri tip in commerical bag to be trimmed and cut into roasts and coulotte steaks.
    That is about it as we are waiting for the next generation to be born tomorrow. Little one is backwards so they will have to do a C section on the mom. Told the neice if they left the baby in there any longer the kid would be graduating from high school before it was born. Of course it gave her something to laugh about instead of worrying.

    1. LOL on your #3. Funny how townfolk just don’t get it. I’ve been both. My dad’s side of the family was lapsed Amish and nobody got a pass on doing work. However, once the work was done it seemed women were the secondary side of the species.

      1. Antique Collector & Mari,

        Funny how townfolk just don’t get it. I’ve been both. My dad’s side of the family was lapsed Amish and nobody got a pass on doing work. However, once the work was done it seemed women were the secondary side of the species.

        lapsed Amish? We always thought those were the Mennonites, LOL.
        The oldest of my kid sisters was here visiting last weekend from Pennsylvania, and our shopping trips included finding burlap and plastic T-posts for her garden. I sent home some onion and cabbage plants with her when she left as well as some LED bulbs & medical gadgets, and she was thrilled.
        We grew up at the edge of a town; but, always had a garden and did canning, freezing, etc. in the fall. She now lives at the edge of a small town (pop 500) back in western PA.
        At age 7 she fell in love with ice skating and at age 16 turned professional, competing and training others. She still does some training at age 60 with a new knee, and like the rest of our family should never be told there is something she cannot or may not do.

          1. Babycatcher,

            No, i think Mennonites came first, but i could be wrong. 😉

            We have always just thought of them as Amish with cars, electricity, and better hygiene. That being said, you force me to do some research on the matter.
            A Brief history of the Amish church began with a rift within a group of Swiss and Alsatian Anabaptists in 1693.
            It was led by Jakob Ammann and his followers became known as Amish. In the second half of the 19th century, the Amish divided into Old Order Amish and Amish Mennonites. The latter mostly drive cars as does the main society during the 20th century, whereas the Old Order Amish retained much of their traditional culture. When it is spoken of Amish today, normally only the Old Order Amish are meant. The Mennonites are members of denominations named after Menno Simons (1496–1561) of Friesland (which today is a province of the Netherlands).
            We have Amish sects here who argue about worldly colors to the point that some use grey sort of reflective tape on the back of their buggies and others will use the orange SMV triangle.

          2. I knew you would look it up! Lol. We have both Old order (horse and buggy) and new order Mennonites( cars and electricity) just south and some West of here, but most of our Amish are in Kentucky and central south TN. 😀

  18. 1. How are you prepping for the expected grocery store sticker shock? Have been trying to keep basics in stock. Need to get much more of canned & dried foods.

    2. Have any of your ever baled hay? Nope.

    3. To all of you lady preppers out there, have you had to deal with even kind-hearted stereotypes about being a self-reliant woman? This is snowflake NJ. I’ve found that men are more appreciative when the “shock” wears off. Most women think food is grown at the grocery store, and only other confident women “get it,” usually older women. Hunting/fishing/gardening families are quite understanding, and they’re scattered around in southern and some eastern counties.

    4. What did you do to prep this week? Didn’t buy enough supplies to suit me, so I’ll likely do more shopping Thursday or Friday around medical appointments. The DP was nastily curious about the solar battery pack that arrived, probably due to the sticker for battery warning. The only use for that would be to charge cell phones, tablet, or my Kindle. I want to get a .22 rifle but still have “no” from the DP. He still doesn’t get it. So much to buy, and so little time in working around so many med appts and idiocy.

    Finally got the deer fence up for the back half of the big garden, and put the cages on the pepper & tomato plants (only 12 total). That back half doesn’t get sun until about 1:00. We’ve had periods of rain every day or every other day. I’ll have to till and plant double rows of green beans & soybeans today as more rain is coming in tomorrow. Darn robins whacked most of the green beans in my small raised bed right thru the insect barrier fabric. That’s a first. I’ll either plant more in the empty spaces or just rip all out and replant. The fabric is now attached to the tulle netting that we had to put up due to the neighbor’s chickens. Right now, I’ve got the insect fabric attached to that and coming down diagonally. I’ll replace that with deer fencing (lightweight plastic mesh). And I’ll have to double cover anything I plant in the big garden with row covers and/or the mesh.

  19. Tara’s Q’s-
    1. How are you prepping for the expected grocery store sticker shock?Growing a garden;although late because of the rains, its doing well, and i got given 52 tomato plants and 8 pepper plants, all heirloom!
    1. Have any of your ever baled hay? Please share your stories.Yes, i have assisted by driving my father in law’s Deutz tractor around while 3 male relatives handed the bales to my then- husband and he stacked them on the hay trailer. My FIL had cattle. I help get the bales out of the field now, so i can feed my horses. I drive the truck with trailer behind, and one guy hands the bales to my son, and he stacks them on the trailer for the ride home.
    2. To all of you lady preppers out there, have you had to deal with even kind-hearted stereotypes about being a self-reliant woman?Absolutely. We used to live in an area where women are considered property like horses and dogs(and although unspoken, its STILL that way), so my motto was “ I’m more man than most men I know” and was/am unapologetic about it. I dont really need to be that way now, cuz my love whom i have been married to for 17.5 years takes excellent care of us, and treats me better than i deserve sometimes. But he sees me as i could be, and i strive to be the best wife i can for him. So I don’t have to be the man anymore, but could if needed. (I was a single parent for many years, and was independent early on, so am hard headed! Lol)
    3. What did you do to prep this week? Helped teach Vacation Bible School to 2nd graders. I am honing my teaching skills and helping the main teacher keep order in the class. I was hand-picked for that reason. We have had a great time, and the children have been good. They know they are loved! (This is also in preparation for teaching this VBS in Massachusetts this summer!)

    Thor’s Q’s-
    1. Do you take supplements for health? Cal/Mag w Zinc, B complex(when i remember it)
    2. How many times a week do you exercise? other than walking 1/2 -2 miles a day, and lifting 40 lb bales of hay daily, and moving a couple hundred pounds of used bricks(for a sidewalk project) and gardening, not much.
    3. How far do you think you could walk in a day during a crisis? 10 miles a day would be my limit, cuz i have hip pain in both sides. Too many years walking on concrete.
    4. How long could you stay home during a pandemic? Months. We have been stashing for awhile now. But i would probably be deployed to do emergency comms.

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