What I Did to Prep This Week

What I Did To Prep This Week – Week 69: November 3rd 2019 – November 9th 2019

horses on pasture

Hello Pack, the fall chill has arrived here in my neck of the woods. I am not one to like it when the temperature gets below 80, but I loathe fall far less since moving onto your dream land. On the up side, our creek actually looks like a creek again and not dry – nor have we had any major flooding yet.

We have not yet been reduced to using the hay we baled for our herds. My enhanced pasture rotation plan seems to have worked out very well. We are going to grub a bit more of a few barely wooded spots in the spring that are not doing anything productive for us now and increase the size of two pasture areas.

WIth Thanksgiving nearly here, my column this week is going to be about how thankful I am to have found this spot of land to live on and turn into a survival homestead.

We did not have to move heaven and earth to literally get this fixer upper farm – but man, it sure felt like it for the year and a half it took to get the deal done and bank to approve all the improvements we made to the land, road, and house to get it to pass inspection.

At the beginning of what turned out to be a three year search for the perfect spot in our county for our survival homestead, my beloved wanted to live in the last house on a dead end road.

One way in – one way out. We only found one two pieces of land that fit this description, and neither measured up in other equally important categories.

One almost perfect spot was right off of a state route – so that was a major downfall and one of the reasons we passed it up. Another, well, created a whole saga in our prepper property search agenda.

When we finally got them down to something reasonable on price for this piece of land that we had fallen in love with and was 99% perfect – we decided to walk away.

We literally had a signed contract in our hand standing at Bobby’s fax machine and neither of us moved to feed the paper in or touch the send button. We stared at each other in silence for what seemed like an eternity – especially because I am quite the talker.

Neither Bobby or I could believe we were walking away from this property that we had been spending the bulk of our waking moments talking about, thinking about, planning in great detail what and where we were going to do specific projects on – for months.

But, the few cons it had thankfully resonated with us at the right moment and we walked away from what we had considered the right spot for us to start our new life on. I am so very grateful.

Our survival homestead is not at the end of a dead end road and that is absolutely the only thing that does not make is a way over the top 100% perfect spot for a survival homestead.

But, because our road was closed in both directions, with only a winding gravel one lane road a ways away being the only way in or out and our private farm road being a half mile from the mailbox to our house – it’s close enough for me.

It was a lot of work to find this place and even more work once it became ours – but every last minute of the turmoil, sweat, bloody hands, sore muscles, and even the epic project idea failures along the way was worth it.

We did garner some prepping bounty this week that I do not want to neglect to share with you.

A hard frost was going to take the rest of my still green tomatoes, so I brought them inside and ripened them in a cardboard box lined with black and white newspaper with a banana placed near them to release extra ethylene gas to hasten the ripening process:

ripening green tomatoes

Our hickory nut trees are producing a load of nuts this year and we are beating the squirrels to the bulk of them:

This Week’s Questions:

  1. What would your dream prepper retreat look like?
  2. What are you most thankful for, from a prepper accomplishment perspective, this year?
  3. What did you do to prep this week?

Tara Dodrill

About Tara Dodrill

Tara Dodrill is a homesteading and survival journalist and author. She lives on a small ranch with her family in Appalachia. She has been both a host and frequent guest on preparedness radio shows. In addition to the publication of her first book, 'Power Grid Down: How to Prepare, Survive, and Thrive after the Lights go Out', Dodrill also travels to offer prepping tips and hands-on training and survival camps and expos.
View all posts by Tara Dodrill →

122 thoughts on “What I Did To Prep This Week – Week 69: November 3rd 2019 – November 9th 2019

  1. I did my low-carb grocery shopping this week. Added a little to my stash as usual. Did some weekly cooking.

    Made some beef jerky. About six pounds of raw meat. Came out nice. Must save some for granddaughter as she likes jerky.

    Speaking of, the poor girl has been sick all week with fevers, coughing, and snotty nose. She is taking it all very bravely especially considering her age (3). She had a chest x-ray done the other day to rule out pneumonia, and her lungs were clear. The diagnosis is, “Probably a virus.” She does seem to be getting better and more lively.

    I see where the Fed pumped $100 billion more into the repo market. I don’t like seeing that nor do I like super low interest rates at this time. The Fed will have no room to create a better recovery environment in the event of another recession. Long past time to get rid of the Fed anyway.

    Bit of a cool down here in Central Florida. Mid-70s this weekend, so I have the windows open. Got some rain Friday night, not a whole lot, but the grass needs it.

    Still working on saving more money this month and buying less gear. So far, so good.

    This Week’s Questions:

    1. What would your dream prepper retreat look like?

    Something like Cheyenne Mountain.

    2. What are you most thankful for, from a prepper accomplishment perspective, this year?

    No hurricanes worth mentioning, so no need to invade the prep supplies.

    3. What did you do to prep this week?

    See above.

      1. Thor1,

        Not as much jerky as you might think. It only filled three quart-sized zip lock bags.

        Granddaughter is a pretty tough kid. If I had the fevers she did, I’d embarrass myself whining and crying. She just laid there quietly and watched cartoons.

    1. Zulu 3-6

      Something like Cheyenne Mountain.

      I once had dreams like this and envied those who had managed to purchase old decommissioned missile silos; but, when I realized the work involved just in upkeep and had not yet won the lottery, I decided to stay where I am.
      I don’t think I could afford the electric to just keep the lights and environmental controls running, let alone running the motors to move those large doors.

        1. Zulu 3-6,
          Big dreams are fine; but, I had thoughts of that old movie, ”The Money Pit” with Tom Hanks and Shelley Long, showing how fast a dream can turn into a nightmare.
          We’ve been here for 35 years and still have a big To Do list and this doesn’t come close to Cheyenne Mountain in size and scope.

    2. Zulu- I hope you enjoy the cooler weather; my DS has been complaining about the heat.
      We are a ways from Cheyenne Mountain, but just over the state line is a decommissioned AT & T facility that is rumored to have multiple stories below ground.

      Food for thought- I wonder how someone could acquire property like that.

  2. Hello,

    My perfect retreat would be 1000 miles south of me. I’ll know it when I see it.

    I’m most thankful this year that I haven’t had to use any of my preps for real. I’m sure that won’t hold up.

    I bought a roll of silver dimes and four Morgan dollars this week. Then I went to the LGS for 420 rounds of 5.56 and 500 rounds of 9mm. Mrs. and I will head to the range this week.

    New software in use for work. Change is always a problem at first. I’ve also been told to hire at least one more technician. More work is coming. Hopefully I can get us to Tennessee sooner.

  3. Another week gone the time is flying too fast.. I did some yard cleaning and now we received a letter from the park’s department, saying we need to trim one of our tree’s down a bit so we will drag out the ladder and trim it down. Our stupid city, wants to banned natural gas, and have only electricity, they have a group trying to push this through by December 9th before our newly elected city council member are sworn in January 2020, because several of the people whom won actually use their brain and not their rear end for their thinking so all electrical houses and solar panels, on the roofs, and guess who pays for all of the upgrades, yup us the taxpayer’s many can’t afford to do all these upgrades, I feel this group is trying to push the blue collar workers, out of here these peoples way of thinking is just like Southern California, and many came from there. Hubby and I are ramping up and selling before this goes through unless the people,
    here hire a lawyer, and try and stop the madness. We are going to continue to work on our other place that’s in the country but I’m afraid propane, will be the next evil item to get banned. I did my usual shopping mostly refrigerator food, We are doing really well on eating the freezer down I don’t want to rely to much on the freezer. I bought some clearance K cup teas, the store dropped them down to a dollar a box. I also did a bit of coupon shopping, bought $18.00 in food for $8.86 cent’s sometimes those coupons really pay off. I’m starting to get Christmas item’s out I want to start making wreaths, and centerpieces, I’ve never done it before so I was able to get all my supplies, at half off all ready, I believe Jo Ann’s, Hobby lobby, and Michael’s, all want Christmas gone I swear before Thanksgiving, everything was 50 to 60 percent off, I don’t ever remember them having sales this early in November like this. If you have Netflix, check out they have a documentary on the Camp Fire aka Paradise Fires, oh my goodness both hubby and I and our daughter, could not hold tears back of course for us it hit home because we have several friends and family that live their and in the Chico, area it just hit my husband in the gut because he wired the school’s, hospital, lots of custom home’s, it was hard on him and we still haven’t heard from one of his friends, we did find out they made it out but haven’t heard from them and everyone we’ve talked to hasn’t seen them since before the fire’s. It’s another 3 day weekend for Veterans day hubby, is in a band that will be playing tomorrow at City Hall, that will be nice both kid’s are going with us have a blessed weekend:)

    1. mom of three,

      we received a letter from the park’s department, saying we need to trim one of our tree’s down a bit so we will drag out the ladder and trim it down.

      Do you have a pole saw or can you borrow one?
      If you have trees, these can be handy and keep you from trying to balance on a ladder with a saw.

      Our stupid city, wants to banned natural gas, and have only electricity

      Stupid is right; but, it seems from here in the Midwest that all of the left coastis crazy stupid, at least TPTB.

      , they have a group trying to push this through by December 9th before our newly elected city council member are sworn in January 2020, because several of the people whom won actually use their brain and not their rear end for their thinking so all electrical houses and solar panels, on the roofs, and guess who pays for all of the upgrades,

      This is the same bullying that’s going on in DC. When you can’t convince them, you have to quickly beat them into submission.

      yup us the taxpayer’s many can’t afford to do all these upgrades, I feel this group is trying to push the blue collar workers, out of here these peoples way of thinking is just like Southern California, and many came from there. Hubby and I are ramping up and selling before this goes through unless the people, here hire a lawyer, and try and stop the madness.

      There is one hope or strategy if the blue collar folks are pushed out and can band together. Those electrical systems, especially the solar ones, will require maintenance and should those blue collar folks band together they can either refuse to service the equipment (since they are always too busy) or charge them accordingly.

      We are going to continue to work on our other place that’s in the country but I’m afraid propane, will be the next evil item to get banned.

      Hopefully in a rural area this isn’t a problem, since if it is, the other inexpensive alternative, firewood would no doubt be in the same shape.

      If you have Netflix, check out they have a documentary on the Camp Fire aka Paradise Fires, oh my goodness both hubby and I and our daughter, could not hold tears back of course for us it hit home because we have several friends and family that live their and in the Chico, area

      We’ll have to check that out. It is BTW called ”Fire in Paradise”

    2. Mom of 3:
      Hopefully your rural retreat will come with an entirely different mindset of neighbors. Best of luck during the windy season.

      1. Yes, it’s better out at our other place but we are starting to see the same thing happen because we are only 30 minutes away but out there at least we can fly our American flag, without feeling wrong about it.

    3. mom of three
      Yes, we remember Paradise.
      Dh & I lived there in the mid 1980’s off Saw Mill Road. Realize that all the places we once lived or places we shopped are all gone. There is only one person we still knew up there and no way of finding out if were still there after her husband passed away.

      1. Oh my that’s hard not knowing where his friends are Paradise was a very Beautiful area, I enjoyed each time to go look at the Antique mall.. I hope your able to find your friend too :

        1. mom of three
          Are you referring to the one on the Skyway coming into Paradise just before the resturante? It would have been on the left hand side of the road, setting down a little from the road way with glass windows that slanted into the building. Very unique design on the building, always loved the way constructed it. I managed to get into a couple of times but did not purhcase anything, just looked and dreamed.

    4. i used to live in one of those comunist towns with municial power, they mandated everyone had to pay a minimal standardiized bill every month for ust owning land in the township, they also had to pay for natural gas owed by the town, sewar and trash etc. everyones bills were lower than the surrounding area but only because it was forced on everyone and divided the bills evenly. just for the 5kwh i used an average month i had a $50 bill, and the dug dealer accross the road from me used several times that but had the same $50 bill. 2 counties unofficially encouraged all the bums and welfare recipiants to move to that township where their free money would go farther, so the town became known as the slums of upstate ny, a tragic falling apart shell of wat it was since the factories closed down. i only stayed a little over 2 years, stupid me mortgaged a house there drawn by the idea of renewable energy from the municipal hydro plant, housing bubble burst 2 months after i moved in and then i owed more htan it was worth, and found the town a rotten drug and bum infested hellhole, ended up abandoning that house to the bank under a voluntarry surrender and fled to the woods in the next county over. that town is also a bastion of upstate democratic voters, the logic wit forcing everyone to do something is to lower the costs a little for everyone dividing it up more evenly, so the bums who use a lot are subsidized by those who don’t use much at all, very much a liberal ideal

  4. Hi Gang,

    The weather yesterday and today will be nice, then there’s going to be a 70% of rain tomorrow, the day they are supposed to install the propane tank… Nuts… Will have to see what they say, as the temps are supposed to drop and then possible snow and of course that would also mean freezing rain and ice. Temps are supposed to drop to 18 degrees mid week, possibly breaking a record set in 1903. I’m off work again on Friday, so we may have to reschedule. Rats.

    Had 2 – 275 gallon IBC totes delivered last night. Now, to decide what to do with them. Possibly wait until spring to figure that out. Too much going on.

    Picked up a brand new foam mattress yesterday to go on the spare bedroom bed. It gets good reviews, and the guy bought it for his camper, but then sold his camper. Brand new in the box… WOW.

    Bought the box springs at Big Lots, it was also a good deal. They are selling out of their Serta stuff and so I got one, and my delivery guy also bought 2 for his house.

    Went to the surgeon who did my surgery in February, and he said I am going to have to have another one to close up the abdominal hernia again… He said the surgery in Feb was very tough, and this opening back up doesn’t surprise him. He said he would try laparoscopic, but it may end up in a cut with staples again. It’s not an emergency, so I can plan. My sister said she would come up in spring if I wanted to wait. Glad I can work from home now too, if I want.

    20,000 BTU heater come in.

    Lithium ion AA and AAA batteries came in.

    Bought a nice roast and froze it. Noticed the prices are sky high now. $15 versus $8 for a chuck roast.

    Tara’s questions:

    What would your dream prepper retreat look like?
    Would have 3 water sources, be off the road, out in the country, as many acres I could afford, off grid in many ways, and of course, in TN.

    What are you most thankful for, from a prepper accomplishment perspective, this year?
    Getting this propane tank installed.
    That I am able to work OT for projects that are lacking.

    Prayers for the pack, for unspoken requests, healing, The President, for protection for The President and his family, and for America.

      1. Almost There & Thor1,

        I think the prices are going to continue to rise.

        That’s another reason to prep by purchasing bulk foods direct. We’ll be eating our $2.80 per pound beef for a few more years, although it did mean having a freezer and purchasing half a beef, all of which are investments that pay off both financially and in food security.

  5. I haven’t been to this site since Creekmore had it. Looks even better than before!
    Turned and rotated compost, added Fall leaf’s to it, thinned out the beets, fertilized the Lime and Tangerine trees. My ultimate Prepper farm would be wherever the Good Lord places me and the DW.
    Visited a number of other Prepper site’s as well, (if that counts?)

    1. Ghost, Many of us are returning -w/some new people as well.All knowledge adds and preps count.. each will make a difference with production now and in any coming times we are granted…

    2. Ghost,

      I haven’t been to this site since Creekmore had it. Looks even better than before!

      It is, and is mostly the same people without the drama that occurred toward the end of MD’s run.

      Turned and rotated compost, added Fall leaf’s to it

      For now our leaves are just piled to start decomposing over the winter. We’ll add lime in the spring and turn into the compost along with more chicken litter then.

      Visited a number of other Prepper site’s as well, (if that counts?)

      It’s your life and anything that adds to being more prepared counts and often the simple things we do are most important.

  6. What would your dream prepper retreat look like?

    You did say dream right? A well funded isolated community with light industry and low energy usage farms. Think Amish without the religious aspects. Low energy, not no energy so a location with hydro power available and statically placed solar panels.

    What are you most thankful for, from a prepper accomplishment perspective, this year?

    I am thankful I was able to get a good start on all the long range plans and repairs to me homestead done.

    What did you do to prep this week?

    What I did this week was part of my homestead improving. My moble home has its drain lines run along the back side of the home. After having to replace a soap residue caked section of the pipe I plumbed the washing machine and the kitchen sink drain 80 feet out to the slough at the edge of my back yard that drains the low spot on the south side of my property. Where the water comes out I pile the leaves from my yard and all summer long have a good place to dig earthworms for bait.

    When I dug out the oak trees from the yard I had to dig up most of the 2 inch drain pipe. The water has been going only half way but until I was able to finish the dirt moving I wasn’t able to replace the line. So now was the time and as the 2 inch pipe was getting clogged I replaced it with 3 in that ment removing all the pipe up to the home. In the many years since I pup the pipe in I let two oak trees grow beside my home and garage. Those were too close to dig out so I sawed them down leaving the stumps. That meant the ground is full of tough oak roots.

    This is on the west side of my home between my three buildings and the tempaures were in the mid 80’s all week. Trying to dig a trench through all those roots had me on my knees with a reciprocating saw getting the larger ones cut and swinging a mattock chopping the smaller ones. An hour a day was all I could put in. Even when I got past the buildings and could use the backhoe to dig the trench I had to climb in and out of it to smooth the bottom and level the pipes.

    As they man says, but wait, there’s more. While I was digging I also had to remove the water line that goes out to my garden because it crossed the drain pipe. While reburying the water line I decided that wold be a good time to run the wiring I needed to connect the generator in my garage to my power pole at the other end of my home. The garage is a separate building so no danger of carbon monoxide. So, more digging through the roots with the last 10 feet almost impossible because the lines have to within 4 feet of one of the oak stumps. I was an idiot not to had cut down that tree in 1983 when I built the garage. Anyway, the lines are on top of some large roots at the edge of the garage’s concrete slab. I guess I will be firing up the chainsaw because the saber saw is too small for them. Yes, the electric lines will be in conduit alongside the water line but there are just too many @#$$% roots to make a deeper wider hole.

    I did have several blessings this week. My under achiever 28 year old son had been living with his older brother for the last five year while finishing college. It took five years because he would only take half a course load. He got his degree last year but didn’t get a job. We got tired of supporting him and I cut off his credit card and his brother started charging him rent. He is engaged to be married to a wonderful girl and it happen that her parents have a small apartment on their property. He moved in there and we just found out he is starting management training at a Target store.

    Last week I was talking to my neighbor’s wife and she mentioned they would like to buy the part of my property that is in front of their home. They want it as a buffer and to clear a little to enlarge their front yard. I have no need for that land and can use $40,000.

    And a small good find, I wanted some sod to cover a bare spot in the front yard and cover some of the dirt in the back. I went to Lowe’s and ask for 20 squares. The garden guy said I could have what was on the pallet for the price of 10 because it was the bottom and they didn’t look so good. I got 32 sqs for $25.

    So here I am, it is cool weather, I can do my outdoor projects with suffering heat stroke and will have the funds for my solar project, final home repairs, and a good sized stash of prepping supplies. Might even sneak an AR-15 in there somewhere. Life is good.

  7. Puppy has been so helpful during this cold spell bringing firewood up to the house. He also has his own workout program of running back and forth in the yard with a quartered log in his mouth. LOL

    Food
    Bought a case of canned grean beans
    Bought a case of canned corn
    Bought 50 lbs of puppy food
    Bought 4 bags of puppy treats

    Water
    Bought 2 cases of water

    Garden
    Still getting peppers

    Gym
    Intense cross training workouts

    Outdoor exercise
    2 mile hike wearing a plate carrier with puppy and his dog out bag..LOL

    Heat
    First fire of the year last night. Cozy..😀
    Glad I bought the swiss army blankets as this is going to be a record cold year.

    Security
    Practiced mag. reloads
    Threw throwing knives and stars.

    Interesting video

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=cTGXsyRvPXo

    Thor’s questions:

    1. Are we heading into a new ice age?
    2. How can laws violating the constitution be legal?
    3 Is a red dawn invasion coming soon?
    4. What do you think it would look like if the welfare system collapsed with record crop and livestock losses and dollar collapse in a record cold year?

    1. Tara’s questions:

      1.What would your dream prepper retreat look like?
      2.What are you most thankful for, from a prepper accomplishment perspective, this year?

      1.A log cabin in the mountains by a lake and/or stream with a bomb shelter underneath it.

      2. Family, health, and the purchase of the new Jeep .

    2. Thor’s questions:

      1. Are we heading into a new ice age?
      I think it’s a real possibility. I’m rereading (actually listening to) “Dark Winter: How the Sun Is Causing a 30-Year Cold Spell” by John Casey, where he correlates solar output and sunspot cycles to historical events like the Little Ice Age. I attended the first earth day in 1970 and people forget that it was an event based on the coming ice age and snowball earth. Casey’s book is probably available at local libraries and is a good; but, mostly technical read.
      2. How can laws violating the constitution be legal?
      They are not; but, it takes political will, honest legislators, and blind justice courts to perform fair and non partisan decisions.
      3. Is a red dawn invasion coming soon?
      No!! Not unless you mean another lame movie remake.
      4. What do you think it would look like if the welfare system collapsed with record crop and livestock losses and dollar collapse in a record cold year?
      It would be bad, especially for those in urban and suburban areas. Out here we would pull together the local MAG and take up positions on the LPOP’s and ramparts.

        1. Thor1,
          The perfect storm is always brewing for at least some segment of the country. We live in a very complex world with interrelated technologies that all depend on each other, and people and services constantly tweaking, adding, and repairing things within that complex infrastructure.
          Modern society has always been like a surfer on a continuous wave, with only a minor hiccup, dumping you into the drink.
          Prepping is the life jacket to keep you afloat when the rest of the world is spinning down the hole.

  8. HI ALL ,,,What happened to the days ,poof and the week is gone ,,remember that 20 cord of fire wood ?from two weeks ago ,DW and I have been splitting and stacking ,,
    Went and did our 6 mounth personal supply run in to town.
    Was reminded to use care with what I post on the web ,
    As for a prep retreat ,,, we live it ,,if you can see the neighbors lights or smell the smoke from there wood stove there to close ,, if folks commuting say it’s only a hour drive to work ,? We drive 8miles once a week to get mail ,UPS leaves packages at the ranch gate after driving a mile and a half on a road that turns into one lane ,the last quarter mile is too ruff ,
    Yet we are looking to move further out ,
    DW and I met homesteading 125+plus miles from town in Alaska ,to go see her I had to walk 7 miles each way

    Was asked about canning lids ,HARVEST GUARD v TATTLER v metal ,we use harvest guard ,have some tattler ,lids and rubber rings interchange ,rubber ring will seal a metal lid ,,,,,,sometimes if the lid is good but old rubber seal is bad , there are some little tricks to using and doing them ,

    Be carefull of what you post ,who is John Galt?
    Tea and cheese cake

    1. Old Homesteader,
      Thank you for your input in the plastic and metal lids. Everything has it’s own set of rules and tricks. Will be stocking up on some Harvest Guard and extra gaskets.
      Juice & Chocolates

      1. Valley,, wisdom and knowledge needed shared with those that seek it ,I like it when I hear ,’how did you do that ‘

        Tea and chocolate

    2. 0ldHomesteader,

      Would you be willing to talk offline? If so, you can click on The Ohio Prepper’s name and it will take you to his site where you can e-mail him and he will send me your e-mail address. I don’t use gmail, yahoo or any other of those e-mail addresses that are free.

  9. Thor’s questions:

    1. Are we heading into a new ice age?

    Not with global warming going on at the same time. Al Gore would be most upset. All kidding aside, I really don’t know. Too much goofy climatological stuff is going on.

    2. How can laws violating the constitution be legal?

    They’re not. Unless the courts refuse to rule otherwise, which they do all too frequently.

    3 Is a red dawn invasion coming soon?

    No.

    4. What do you think it would look like if the welfare system collapsed with record crop and livestock losses and dollar collapse in a record cold year?

    We’d be looking at a major TEOTWAWKI situation along with serious case of WROL. The welfare rats would go crazy first as they see themselves absolutely entitled to their benefits ahead of anyone else. Other unprepared people following on.

  10. This Week’s Questions:

    1. What would your dream prepper retreat look like? Box canyon like with a year round stream through it. Preferably with a thermal well.
    2. What are you most thankful for, from a prepper accomplishment perspective, this year? Growth in our food stocks. We lack the land to grow enough food so we must rely on what we have put up.

    3. What did you do to prep this week? Well…

    Worked on my AR: installed a 4# Timney solid trigger, Holsun HS403C sight, Mag-Pul fore grip, MOE forward QR sling attachment, adj. para-cord sling. Now for some trigger time!

    Ordered more bulk food for next week p/u. WinCo gives another 5% off it you order bulk supplies in bulk quantity (ie. beans in 25# bags, etc.).

    I have a condition I call “chronic ache”. I have a friend who knows someone who found relieve in Yew Bark Tea. That stuff is just too bad for either of us, so we go with the capsules. He’s been on it a month with better sleep, less pain, and less migraines. I started mine this week, I hope it works as well for me. It takes about a month of consumption for the benefits to kick in.

    Deal of the week: A new Carhart coat, originally $119.99 was marked down to $89.99. Then they gave me the Veteran’s Day 15% discount. End result: $76.49! (Darn, I didn’t get the color I originally wanted!)

    Supply Run: HW wheat (Wheat Montana); rice; LS SPAM; canned chicken; 7-grain hot cereal; bucket lids; Carhart coat; ammo; dehydrated potato shreds;

    Received: Buckets, 3.5-gal; Book: Indian Country (Book 2); Book: Renewal (Book 3); long-handled pain cream applicator; Red Feather butter; Book: Ham Technician Class study guide; Yew Bark capsules;

    Another week of “shaking the dust off my feet” when trying to talk to others about prepping. They are 1) in denial, 2) assured that The Rapture will save them before the US collapses, 3) acknowledge they should do something but use a long list of excuses to not even start. Oh well, I’m not ready to quit, but it’s getting to be an effort.

    1. JpinMt
      Your ‘chronic pain’ is probably because you are low on magnesium and calcium.

      Of course this information came from a company that is selling their product mag/calcium but the tests listed several of the symptoms above for you and your friend. Our bodies require more of these minerals as we age, the cells have a hard time absorbing them, hence the reason for your pain and your friends lack of sleep.

      1. AC:

        My friend like cars & motorcycle at speed and is now paying the price. We both failed to take proper care of ourselves and are now paying the piper. His last fall at work (his business) tore his rotator cuff and the muscle in his upper arm (looking left, walking right). Most of his body is no longer in alignment, resulting (I think) in the chronic migraines. We could have some vitamin/mineral deficiencies, but my DW keeps an eye on me and stuffs me full of supplements.

        If I could drop the extra 80 pounds pulling on the front, by back would probably respond favorably.

        But thanks for the suggestions.

        1. JP,

          If I could drop the extra 80 pounds pulling on the front, by back would probably respond favorably.

          Around here we call that Dunlap’s disease, where your belly dun laps over your waist and belt. I dealt with that back in 2006, dropping from 235 to 172 in about 6 months. I now weigh in at around 145 which @ 5’ 6” is a pretty good weight.
          Prior to 2006 I ached all over; but, that simple loss of weight made all the difference and I have no aches or pains except on the occasion when I get in a hurry and do something stupid.
          As we age, taking things slow and easy seems to be at least one part of the solution.

        2. JPinMT
          You are correct about the headaches in relationship to the fall. One to many accidents as a kid & young adult misligned my neck and I had headaches that would put most people down. My eyes would hurt so bad I hated to open them.

          Chiroprator discovered my neck was out of alignment, he adjusted it over a period of weeks, I no longer have headaches & haven’t had them since the early 1990’s.

          Amazing what we did to ourselves when we were younger…and boy howdy are we paying for it now!!

          1. Antique Collector & JP,

            You are correct about the headaches in relationship to the fall. One to many accidents as a kid & young adult misligned my neck and I had headaches that would put most people down..

            These are the kind of things that once again really make me feel lucky. My parents met roller skating, and I started skating at about age 7 with the metal wheeled strap on street skates, later graduating to real skates with boots and precision bearings at the local roller rink. At age 12 or 13 I started taking Judo at the local YMCA until my mother found out and stopped it, since she didn’t think I should learn to ”Beat up people” and there was no explaining it to her. I loved her dearly; but, she could on occasion be thick headed.
            From contact in the martial arts through Judo, I was put in contact with a Karate instructor who taught at his home for no charge for those that were serious, so I was secretly taking training once again.
            In all of the martial arts I have been involved with, the first thing you are taught to do is safely fall without getting hurt. These lessons stick with you and have saved my bacon numerous times when skating or simply walking. The balance learned by these lessons also tend to make you walk a bit differently, making you much more stable even on ice or uneven ground.
            While you can’t just install this experience into older people, there are some exercise forms that can help, with the best IMHO being ”Tai Chi”. The essential principles of Tai Chi include integrating the mind with the body and control of movements and breathing, all of which helps both fitness and balance.
            The DW & I took Tai Chi for a bit last February; but, since she is the driver and not a night owl, the late classes didn’t work with our schedule, although she enjoyed them and was making progress in her balance. We’re still looking to get involved if we can find closer or earlier classes.

            Chiroprator discovered my neck was out of alignment, he adjusted it over a period of weeks, I no longer have headaches & haven’t had them since the early 1990’s.

            A good chiropractor can work wonders. On rare occasions when my neck or back are out of alignment, I’ll go to a local one who is really good.
            The DW has a bad lower back and doesn’t go as often as I would like; but, when she does, he helps her a lot.

    2. JP,

      Another week of “shaking the dust off my feet” when trying to talk to others about prepping. They are
      1) in denial

      Normalcy bias seems rampant, at least in urban areas; but, I no longer feel guilty about being in a better situation, nor obligated to help them, at least after TSHTF. While they may plead for help, my compassion has worn thin since they made their decision and will have to live with it.

      2) assured that The Rapture will save them before the US collapses

      Perhaps it will and I’ll probably not be included; but, I’m OK with that and will enjoy the peace and quiet with those extra people all gone.

      3) acknowledge they should do something but use a long list of excuses to not even start.

      This is unfortunately what I see the most; but, once again, their decision and their consequences. I didn’t see #4; the, I don’t need to prep since I know where you live. That’s an old one; but, around here people know that uninvited guests can potentially suffer from the old maxim: ”Trespassers may be shot. Survivors may be shot again”

      Oh well, I’m not ready to quit, but it’s getting to be an effort.

      Actually the DW & I have been living this lifestyle for such a long time that it’s just normal. It helps that she grew up on a farm just 2 miles from here and has relatives in the area who live a similar lifestyle.

      1. i just learned how to upload pictures to the internet without an actual account on it. so i am showing the sign i have on the gate in front of my place, its like the old tresspassers will be shot but this one just strikes more existential terror into every would be tresspasser.

        https://ibb.co/5TC4yz8

    3. Good deal on the new Carhart coat! Sweet price, even if it is the color you desired. What color is is? What color did you want? Thanks for serving our country. We don’t thank our veterans enough.

      1. Jean:

        The coat it is black, I was looking for tan.

        You are welcome. I remember a time when military people were not well thought of. I am thankful for the recognition they now get. Not to mention the 3 free (or close to) meals the DW (who also served 22 years) and I will greatfully accept on Monday.

        1. It seems the tan is the color of choice, but it was still a good deal! It will serve you very well this winter! I remember when vets were not treated so well, especially Vietnam vets. I celebrate your service! Your friend!

  11. Hi Tara, Dan, & all,

    the fall chill has arrived here in my neck of the woods.

    Fall chill? More like the first winter blast, with highs in the past week hitting the low 60’s and lows hitting the mid teens. It looks like real snow is not far away.

    WIth Thanksgiving nearly here, my column this week is going to be about how thankful I am to have found this spot of land to live on and turn into a survival homestead.

    I’m all in with you there. We started out here as a rental some 35 years ago, and literally fell in love with the place, its meandering creek and the two 100 year old post & beam, mortise & tenon barns. At the time we didn’t have any thoughts of purchasing the place; but, the owner was already in a home with Alzheimer’s, and passed away 2 years later, giving us this opportunity of a lifetime.

    One almost perfect spot was right off of a state route – so that was a major downfall and one of the reasons we passed it up.

    We’re just the opposite, and sit along a well traveled state route, a portion of which was just recently repave for 15 miles in each direction from us. We are located far enough off the road that no one notices the buildings; but, the road is a well traveled enough north / south truck route that ODOT salt and plow trucks hit it early and fast, and we’ve never been snowed in.

    It seems that there are quite a few Nerds & Geeks like me interested in a SHTF Post Collapse scenario; but, one where we still have computer technology available and there is a project in place to help that end. ” Collapse OS” Bootstrap post-collapse technology: https://collapseos.org/. I’m just starting to look at it; but, along with the Raspberry Pi, the various Arduinos, Beagles, and others, we still plan to have computers doing our bidding, post SHTF.

    Tara’s Questions
    1. What would your dream prepper retreat look like?
    It looks like where we currently live and have lived for the past 35 years, with just a few incremental improvements like our recent new building and finishing the summer kitchen.
    2. What are you most thankful for, from a prepper accomplishment perspective, this year?
    That would be our new building, a good supply of propane & firewood, and the fact that we’re still alive to use and enjoy it all.
    3. What did you do to prep this week?
    As always, see below.

    TOP’s question
    1. Michael Bloomberg has registered for the March 3, Alabama primary. Will his entry into the race as a democrat materially affect the outcome?
    2. San Francisco has passed a new law requiring carry out bags of food to be sealed to keep delivery drivers from sharing your food. Is this a solution in search of a problem or a real problem?
    3. Are you an imperialist? Rep. Ilhan Omar endorses Bernie Sanders, says he will fight against ‘western imperialism’ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A9LuUGxQTcU
    And: https://www.washingtonexaminer.com/opinion/what-western-imperialism-ilhan-omar

    Omar BTW was born in Mogadishu, Somalia on October 4, 1982 and is now a naturalized citizen and member of the US House of Representatives which means to me that our imperialism isn’t working too well. LOL

    This week we acquired and did the following.
    1. Picked up our absentee ballots and voted, all for local township candidates.
    2. Purchased a 4 foot folding portable table to help with sorting / decluttering.
    3. New timer for the clothes washer
    4. The DW cleaned the ventless heaters and we fired up both of them for the first time this season. The furnace has already come on a few times, telling us winter is on the way.
    5. We got out the Terra Cotta pots, cleaned them up and started using them for auxiliary heat in the kitchen.
    6. Discussion with one of our financial advisors to discuss investment allocations. It went well enough that they dropped our management fee from 1.8% to 1.5% saving almost $500.00 per year.

    1. TOP’s questions

      1. Michael Bloomberg has registered for the March 3, Alabama primary. Will his entry into the race as a democrat materially affect the outcome?

      No. He’s just one more clown on the list.

      2. San Francisco has passed a new law requiring carry out bags of food to be sealed to keep delivery drivers from sharing your food. Is this a solution in search of a problem or a real problem?

      I don’t know. Maybe it is a problem in San Francisco. However, as that place has a history of creating problems where none existed before, I’d say this is a solution in search of a problem.

      3. Are you an imperialist? Rep. Ilhan Omar endorses Bernie Sanders, says he will fight against ‘western imperialism’.

      Omar is not only an idiot; she is an ungrateful idiot. She wouldn’t know a real imperialist even if one shot at her with a Gatling gun or a Martini-Henry.

      1. Love the references to the antique guns. One of my favorite movies is “Zulu” with Michael Caine and Stanley Baker as Lieutenants Bromhead and Chard holding the impis at bay from the cover of the mealie bags. The amazing discipline of the Thin Red Line has fascinated me since childhood.

        1. Overwatch,

          I always liked the movie Zulu. But, unfortunately, the battle didn’t go quite the way the movie shows. Nor were the characters always performed accurately either.

          For instance, Private Hook was shown as a lazy, malingering, slacker. When in reality, he was specifically assigned to defend the hospital because he was a good and experienced soldier who required little supervision. Same with the rest of the soldiers assigned there. There were no spare officers or NCOs to assign to the hospital, so they had to pick privates who could do the job.

          Also, Lt Bromhead was deaf as a post, although he had been a reasonably competent infantry officer before he went deaf. Lt Chard was considered by his fellow engineer officers as a lazy sod. Chard was specifically left in-charge by the major who actually commanded when he left to get reinforcements. Chard was senior by a couple of years, not mere months as in the movie.

          Color Sergeant Bourne was only 23-years old and known by the troops as “The kid.” He did live the longest of all the survivors, dying at about 90 as a retired Lt. Col.

          It is believed that the actual ramrod for the defense was Acting Commissary Dalton. He was a retired infantry regimental sergeant major and knew what to do.

          The troops did not engage in volley fires. The moment the Zulus came around the mountain and into view, the troops opened fire. No war dancing done either.

          No preacher or daughter was present. They skedaddled the day before.

          There are many more defects, but it still comes down to the fact that those few British soldiers held off 4,000 Zulus.

    2. Top’s questions:

      1. Michael Bloomberg has registered for the March 3, Alabama primary. Will his entry into the race as a democrat materially affect the outcome?
      2. San Francisco has passed a new law requiring carry out bags of food to be sealed to keep delivery drivers from sharing your food. Is this a solution in search of a problem or a real problem?
      3. Are you an imperialist? Rep. Ilhan Omar endorses Bernie Sanders, says he will fight against ‘western imperialism’

      1. No the Dems will still lose due to their anti-American policies. Look at the pro Trump chants during the college football game.

      2. Yes they should have that.

      3. I am a constitutionalist conservative.

      1. Thor1,

        1. No the Dems will still lose due to their anti-American policies. Look at the pro Trump chants during the college football game.

        Not only that; but, Bloomberg seems to be clueless about how his ” Everytown for Gun Safety” will hurt him.
        Also, as NYC mayor in 2012 he proposed the ”Portion Cap Rule” that required food service establishments to limit the size of cups for sugary drinks to 16 oz.
        In his mind we should not have guns and are all fat, and stupid enough to vote for him,

    3. i would say its solving a problem, ihave heard tat statistically a lot of delivery driver pinch some food wile delivering, its real bad with ubereats, the drivers make so little they just take the food and say nobody was home.

      out here its in the 20s and we just had 8 inches of snow dumped on us, there are no places that deliver food anymore, used to be 3 pizza places but 2 are closed and i will not orde from the 3rd again. the 3rd would take up to 2 hours to deliver and it was always cold and congealed. one of the last times i placedte order and was told it would be a 40 minute delivery, at 2 hours i called and they said the delivery girl left an hour and a half earlier, they called her and she couldn’t be bothered to fllow directions to my place, had driven past it then was sitting for an hour and a half in her car down the road playing on her cell. tey gave me her number and i called and she said she didn’t see my place (expecting a mowed lawwn and a driveway, not a small cabin off in the woods) i told her to wait 5 minutes so i could get my boots on and i would run to the roadside to meet her and told her i was on the left. she immediatly headed out looking to the right since thats where houses with lawns were as power was run behind the houses on the other side of the road (i was off grid, lack of power meant that lot was cheap), i ran up just in time to see the back of her car and her hed looking the wrong way. she drove back to the pizza place and sat till her boss called her and she drove out again looking in the wrong direction and only saw me when i jumped into the road waving my arms. then this fat native girl got out took out a cold congealed pizza missing 3 slices and demanded i pay $38 for it, i asked why it was missing 3 slices and she said thats how the shop makes them now, i saw wing sauce on her lip an asked where the ozen wings were and the 2 litre soda, she said i didn’t order wings or a soda (despite that it was on the bill), i flat out refused to pay for it and she started screaming at me, i told her to get her fat ass back to the pizza shop and take the pizza with her and i wasn’t paying her a cent. she had a lot of vulger obcenities to say. i called her manager who was also a jerk abot it and refused to beleive what i was telling him. i boycotted that pizza place ever since. thats the worst one, but mny times my dozen wings came as just 10 or 11, or a half dozen garlic knots were just 5. a friend of mine had a chip stand on the rez go out of business because everyone he hired under the native prefrence policy stole from the till and gave free food to their friends and he sold the stand rather than deal with that nonsense, also there is no health inspections on the rez, so sanitation its often lacking. i can imagine in places like commie california the delivery people also pinch food when making deliveries or spit in it if someone called them out on their bs (what would likely happen had i ordered from that pizza place again), a sealed container would limit or stop a lot of that shenanagans

      1. Nemoseto:
        Not sure what reservation you live near. I live between two reservations.Where I live all reservation food sellers and handlers must pass a food handlers class. They know cleanliness, temperatures, time ECT and must have the card. Even if they are just selling tacos or frybread from home.
        I pastored a mission church here for years and we often had food sales to cover expenses. I had the man who was teaching the reservation classes hold a class every few years at the church so everyone participating in the sales had a current card – including me.
        Honesty is required and watched for. Jobs are scarce so people try to hang on to them.
        My great grandfather was from Rosebud reservation. One the most hopeless places in America. Poverty. Lack of a good education for most. Poor modeling for young people with little hope or motivation. They were hardworking people. Hunter gatherers and many already settling in to reservation life and learning to farm…then they went to a dance. Not a call to arms but a dance with wishful thinking that living right and dancing would bring back freedom and pride. Instead it brought horror and death. My great grandfather survived. Badly wounded and deeply scared for life. His wife, most of their children and his brother and his entire family lay dead when he found them in the before dawn snow. He took his infant daughter from her dead mothers arms and walked away. He saw a soldier tie up his horse to do his business behind a bush. So he lay his sleeping daughter down and took the horse circling back to the ridge above the soldier to pick up the baby and rode away. Later he met another injured man traveling with his wife, an infant and 8 year-old daughter. All getting as far away as possible. Their 5 and 7 year old boys had been shot in a box canyon with a group of little boys. They also had a horse.
        After that, that reservation was treated worse than the rest. They were on almost useless lands in what is called the badlands. Their food rations stolen or just never delivered. Same with the winter blankets. Only sometimes did they have medical care. Medicine people were locked up often, misunderstood, and feared. It only started changing some about 1950. By then the family unit was destroyed. Dispare won. Just a few changed and tried to get others to do better. Its still a loosing battle much of the time. I know they could learn but how to you break the cycle of hopelessness? Too often 9 and 10 year-olds are already alcoholics.
        People were broken. How do you heal that heritage? My great granfather remarried and had a new family far as he could get away from that place of death. Later in life after the second wife died and the kids were all on theirown he lived as a drifter. Work a few weeks, move then pick up a job, finish it and move on. By then he was a good carpenter and he’d follow construction jobs. Without his wife to encourage him, he was afraid again of being sent back to that reservation. He stayed with us for a few weeks when I was 5. 1952. He taught me many things in the little while. But when he told me about the massacre he didn’t want me to see his tears.
        He sat down with his back to a tree and I sat between his knees. I still remember the hot tears pouring down my back as he told me about that day.
        How do you take that memory away from a group held captive by the collective memory of many including little children being hunted down and killed. Their chief was old and sick in bed with pneumonia. The next day his frozen body lay in the snow. Soldiers laughed and photos were taken of him. I’ve seen them.
        For decades it was illegal to leave without a hard to get pass. To live off reservation ment being hunted down and likely killed. Natives severed this nation in WWII. A few even severed in WWI. It was illegal to sell alcohol to Indians till 1950. Most would be better off without it. Natives were given the right to vote by federal law the same year women were given the right to vote. But it was left up to each state to ratify or implement that right. Utah was the last one to give Natives the vote…in 1956.
        Back when natives were being rounded up and put on reservations blacks were legally still 5/8 humans and Natives were not even humans.
        Some places have fared better than others. Land that could graze cattle or raise crops helped. Good agents overseeing a reservation helped. Today you can really see the difference in how people live today. My people still suffer. Thankfully my great grandfather escaped and never lived there again.
        I still carry a bit of that distrust and fear but I live a quiet peaceable life. I raised my children to honor this nation. A son in the Air Force was part of Desert Storm. A son in the Navy made it a career putting in 22 1/2 years before retiring. A stepson put in 15 years in the Army and reserves. Another son was a Haliburton contract employee in Iraq.
        I think about all the men and women from the reservations that went to war for this nation. This is still our land. We still protect it. We didn’t see land in terms of ownership. Where the creator placed us or allowed us to be was a sacred trust to be protected.
        I wish your experience were better. There is no excuse for one person to treat another like that. Our old way was to treat others as guests unless they proved to be enemies.
        I come to these groups as a fellow prepper at heart. Not militant but a steward of my resources and perhaps I can learn ways to be better at it.
        Your treatment was just part of the time we live in. I hate to see the moral break down wether its on a reservation or in a city. Glad you refused to pay for the food and called the manager. Sorry he seemed no better. I’d have done the same and been angry.

        1. the local reservation is technically a reserve not a reservation, the tribe remains on their historical territory but were boxed in. it helped that they lived on otherwise worthless swampland that nobody else wanted so never got displaced. the rez is only half in the US the other half is in Canada, with St Lawrence River cutting through the territory and international shipping going from atlantic to the great lakes through the rez, the Cnadian side is also cut in half divided between Ontario and Quebec, the US side it bisected by 2 NY counties which are parts of diferent regional services, BP, state cops, county sherrifs, coast guard, local cops, and the euivelant on the other side of the border, make it whats called a jurisdictional nightmare to the point everything is ignored because nobody is sure hos job it is to do what, its also a hotspot of smuggling since going over the ice in winter, or by boat makes it like an open nomans land on the border. friend of mine once found a 55 gallon drum ok coke (not the soda) while scuba diving in the river, it was tossed off a lake ship and was picked up by someone before the cops could get there, one of many smuggling opperations. as a result its become a lawless hellhole where anyone with a fast boat or wits nd a car can make $30k in a weekend, so no work ethic and the jurisdictional mess means everyone is used to ignoring the law and doing whatever. when i did some work planting black ash i could technically be standing in one spot legally but take one step to the side and its a felony, its such a complicated mess that nobody bothers paying attention unless they are caught, and a few people in court even tried to claim that smuggling drugs was their cultural heritage.

          i used to be the tribes forester but they were more interested in bulldozing the few woodlots they had and putting in cheap housing developments. i would actually cry when i inventoried a nice 40 acre stand of mature red oak, sent my report up to the tribal leadership, then they bulldozed it into big piles and burned it and put in a new parking lot on it. its all about free handouts and doing as little as possible here. i can go on with a lot of stories but i can leave it at saying that place is a mess.

          1. That is a really sad situation. I know the area you’re talking about but not a lot about it. Actually their historical ffoot print was much larger. They were squeezed into the “worthless” area over time. Not by choice. But I agree the wooded area and more care could have given them a different life. Even milling and using the wood would have been more productive than burning it.
            It was 1961 when we were visiting relatives in the New England area. My grandmother was born in Deposit NY. Mom was Raised in SW PA on an apple farm. Cousins in Mass. but mostly Boston, Main, Vermont, Connecticut, up state New York, and long island. On the way we also visited Dads cousins in Kansas and saw his hometown of Atchison, Kansas. It was a fun trip but we also saw some reservations, reserves, and tiny rancherias. A few prosper but on too many the poverty is intense.
            The two reservations I live near were like that for the most part. Poverty and hopelessness. I first moved here in 1977- 2005 I worked away a few years ago then returned in late +2016. Homes were Adobe or rock with adode morter. Flat roofed. A lot of mobile Homes because they are cheaper and quick. There were two different groups that went to school and got their building contractors licenses. Others bought up old smaller buses and began putting together teams for contract firefighting. Some are so good they are always being called out. They have to maintain training and physical fitness. Even the women have to meet that requirement even if they go as camp cooks. They had a little bingo hall, then a gas station. That grew into a casino and hotel with a good restaurant and a MacDonalds and a laundry and a service station for truckers and travelers and a big fulservice area for motorhome travelers to park and stay or just overnight. Even a Family Dollar has just opened close by.
            The other reservation had a 5 mile wide open pit uranium mine and underground mining going out from the pit. It was just over a mile from a village. A railroad spur ran up there and uranium ore as was hauled out by the train load in open topped ore 0cars. It was opened in the mid 1950s and closed around 1990. Many tribal members had worked there. When it closed they formed a corporation to do mine clean up. Then they opened a factory making little units built to order. They can be mobile. command centers, first aid stations, communications centers ECT. They are sold and maintained all over the world. Salesmen travel worldwide as do specialist repair men. Then they opened a very popular casino with hotel and several restaurants inside and a big service center outside for truckers and travelers. World class entertainers are booked there frequently. Their old little casino built on the reservation has grown into quite a travel center for truckers and travelers but the restaurant is popular with locals and travelers. And a good grocery store was built there. On that reservation if your home needs repairs or an addition or a garage or storage shed tribal members are paid to do the work if you provide the materials. Many now live in HUD financed homes in groups with sewer and water services. Paid for by the residents prorated on incomes.
            The increase in job opportunities has made a world of difference in the people.

          2. Nemoseto,

            i used to be the tribes forester but they were more interested in bulldozing the few woodlots they had and putting in cheap housing developments. i would actually cry when i inventoried a nice 40 acre stand of mature red oak, sent my report up to the tribal leadership, then they bulldozed it into big piles and burned it and put in a new parking lot on it.

            This is sad and makes me think your tribal leadership is a soulless group of people. Selective cutting of trees like these can often make a lot of money for the raw logs. We logged a woodlot of about 9-10 acres some years ago and the DW & her 2 brother split more than $20,000.00 and this was a selective cut, not a clear cut. I was then able to go into that woods and cut up the limbs and tops that were not harvested and put together more than 1.5 cords of hard wood for firewood.
            With care they could have had a tree lined parking lot and made enough money to build and maintain the thing. I guess politicians and bureaucrats are the same in all cultures.

          3. There is little demand for oak lumber. When I took down the big oak trees near y home I went to a family friend that has a saw mill two miles from me. He said no one wants oak anymore. A five acre plot across from my church was heavily wooded with large oak trees. It was cleared and all the trees were burned on site.

          4. Daddio7,

            There is little demand for oak lumber. When I took down the big oak trees near y home I went to a family friend that has a saw mill two miles from me. He said no one wants oak anymore.

            Around here Oak is still in demand a little; but, Black Walnut that used to be worth a fortune is now out of style. A good diameter straight veneer grade log used to be worth a lot; but, when I had my 90’ Ash taken down back in 2016 the arborist also took down a few black walnut and just left them where they fell.
            I guess people prefer paint and plastic to real wood now.

            A five acre plot across from my church was heavily wooded with large oak trees. It was cleared and all the trees were burned on site.

            That is no doubt a regional thing. I recall that you are in Florida where turning 5 acres of oak into firewood is not the same as here in the north where we are already experiencing bitter cold. The rule of thumb is 1 cord per acre per year for management; but, I suspect you could get 8-10 cords if clear cut, and not burned on site. What a waste, if we could only teleport the logs here. LOL.

          5. Lol too bad that oak would couldn’t be teleported here as well. Fire wood is hard to come by. Most is juniper bushes and if cut on federal lands it must be dead or down. (Remember the largest land owner in the western states is the US government.)
            Cords of firewood sell for close to $200 per 4’x4’x8′ you haul and stack. Most that are able get the permits and cut their own. Oak is rare. And prized because it burns hotter and longer than pinion or juniper. Juniper here really is big old bushes. Not taller trees.

          6. Clergylady,

            Cords of firewood sell for close to $200 per 4’x4’x8′ you haul and stack. Most that are able get the permits and cut their own. Oak is rare. And prized because it burns hotter and longer than pinion or juniper. Juniper here really is big old bushes. Not taller trees.

            $200.00 a cord is a bit much here. Cut and stacked or piled goes for less than $100; but, we have a lot of woodlots and scrap around here. Wood that would once have been used for lumber like, Oak, Ash, and Black Walnut are now routinely used for firewood, with Ash and others being limited by law to not transportable between counties, due to the emerald ash borer.
            I had a 90 foot tall 42 inch diameter Ash removed a few years ago, since the borer had killed the thing and it was shedding limbs the size of large trees into the driveway and the yard. We also have other reasonably hard woods like Osage orange (hedge apple), and locust, that burn well enough when seasoned.

          7. a few mentioned it but yeah, i pushed for them to keep the oak as shade trees, or at the very least give the community a 3 week help yourself window to go in and let people take what they want as firewood, i saw similar stuff when i was studying at esf ranger school (forestry college), they marked high value trees to sell to loggers at a place in the mountains then let the locals help themselves to everything else, locals cleaned all the crap so the loggers had an easy time and the sale was much more. the locals on the rez though were all about free handouts and doing as little as possible. when we thinned a black ashstand in tsnye (the canadian side) we skidded out lots of green ash that were competing and it was offered to the comunity, anyone could come get it at the landing, then people complained that we didn’t cut it into firewood for them and that we weren’t offering delivery to their houses, then one weekend one guy who was taking most of the green ash and selling it decided my crew didn’t skid out enough for him and when we werenot there he cut and took dozens of the residual trees we left up, then the following week other people went in pillaging the trees that were supposed to stay, then customs and bp and local cops had to be involved and we cabled off the work area to stop it but people cut the cables.

            honestly it was amazing that the one white guy working there cared more about the tribes forests than the natives did, they openly mocked me for cleaning up garbage one our work sites (the guys on the crew tossed their trash out anywhere and thought i was dumb for trying to keep the area cleaned). i got the job cause i was the only one qualified who appied for it, but after a few years the tribe cut the funding over and over till the program basically collapsed and i quit having enough government bs and all the crap i saw.

            they did try my idea years later when they had a 5 acre stand of basswood (linden) that they wanted cleaned out for another facilty to be built,they offered the comunity access to help themselves, nobody wanted to cause it was among the worst firewood, then one of the cheifs came down to my farm and tred to get me to go cut it saying i could sell the wood myself, even when it was free nobody wanted to pput any work into it, i was too far from it to be cost effective to bother with it myself (20 miles each way, the truck i had at the tme could do maybe half a full cord per trip and i could only get at best $90 a cord split and seasoned, 1000s of natives lived less than 6 miles from that stand), and for weeks they kept trying to get anyone to go cut some of it, no idea what ended up happening with that lot.

            the red oak was destroyed a decade ago, and it was going $250 per 1000 board foot stumpage locally at the time.

          8. Reservations too often give a good example of what happens with socialism. Prisioners were kept. Supposed to be fed and given necessities. If it happens they became dependant…a planned way of control. If it didn’t happen as it was supposed to be then the people became dispondant and hopeless. It still equalled controlled. Leaving was to be hunted and punished or death.
            Here we are over 100 years later and the control worked for the most part. A few smart ones fought back and won the right to be somewhat selfgoverning. A few who did fight to get an education went home or came home from the armed services and worked for change. Those places have developed jobs and businesses or opened casinos because of a lack of other resources. Pockets here and there are still like what you described and will never change until someone decides to change or they’re forced to change.
            Making people dependant has a side that’s dangerous. What happens if you can’t sustain the delivery? They suffer and don’t know how to make it work. It can take a generation or more to start creating change.
            Look at GREECE or Venezuela. Healing what’s broken will take time once leadership is on track for change.
            I’ve watched the changes made on the reservations here by my unincorporated village. I moved here in 1977. The big money jobs in uranium mining and milling still looked safe. By 1981 mines were closing and families were moving away to find other work. By 1990 the mines were all closed and it was time to fight for clean up. People were dying of mostly lymphoma cancer. I watched as the decision was made to form a clean up corporation and really learn the best ways to do it. It helped save a village then the tribe. The other tribe was afraid of change but seeing the neighbors improving their lot inspired them to change as well.

  12. 1. What would your dream prepper retreat look like? I like what I have, but I wish it was more secluded.
    2. What are you most thankful for, from a prepper accomplishment perspective, this year? I’m thankful that I got my greenhouse, increased my flock of chickens, and have things well-stocked for the winter.
    3. What did you do to prep this week?

    This week:

    *Animals:
    -Picked up doe from being bred. We should have kids in March. I’m hoping for a couple of doelings since this is her last breeding before being retired to pet status.

    *Garden:
    -Turnips aren’t ready yet, but I’m getting a lot of lettuce from the greenhouse. Tomato and pepper plants died. I didn’t have auxiliary heat, and they got too cold. I knew this year was going to be about learning. Lesson learned.

    *Prepping purchases/added a little to the stockpile: lots of hygiene products, flour, spaghetti sauce (Huge sale.), hand/body creams,

    *Miscellaneous:
    -The plantain salve that I made is wonderful! I used it on Grandson’s awful diaper rash, and he’s clear after one day! We’re calling is Grammy’s Yard Salve. 😊

    *Skills:
    -I have been keeping the four youngest grandkids (Instead of the just the two that I usually keep.) for the last few weeks. One day this week while they were here, the four-year-old and three-year-old made apple crumb pie from scratch, including the crust. (With help from Grammy.) The pie filling was some that I had canned from apples we got at the orchard. Both girls went home with the pie they made, and they were so proud of their accomplishments. I was told that they also told Mommy, Daddy, and Brothers all about how they made it.
    At one point during the process, Four-Year-Old said, “Grammy, there’s powder all over the kitchen.” Yes, there was. But two little girls are learning to cook from scratch. More importantly, they’re learning that work can be fun and has a wonderful payoff. (Sorry this was so long, but I’m proud of them.)

    Be prepared. Stay safe. He’s in charge.

        1. Thor1,

          PG, that just sounded so wrong…LOL
          “Picked up doe from being bred. We should have kids in March.”

          We make bred doe all of the time and bake it. As for the kids, they could have been grandkids who will be visiting in March. LOL
          Perspective is everything.

      1. Very easy. I will find the link, but it contained plantain, coconut oil, and beeswax. I also added tea tree oil and lavender oil.

  13. Been a busy week.
    Worked 4 extra hours a day every day up through Saturday to get caught up at work. Took 2 days off for sister’s funeral and no one touched any of my work. Seems they said I never taught them how. Oh well, I’ll fix that oversight soon.

    Went to a local prepper store yesterday (TruPrep) as they were having an 8th anniversary sale and had a lot of really good stuff at good prices. I blew my budget but got some good stuff. They were giving away door prizes. I won a Berkey Light filtration system and have add that to the stores along with the Big Berkey I already have and extra filters. They were giving away a Glock 19 in a drawing and all you had to do was sit through a 15 minute “situational awareness” class. It was a good class, nothing new that I didn’t already know or practice but a good reminder. They also gave away free hotdogs, chips and sodas so it was a win win day with free lunch. They had a huge stack of Boefing 2 band transceivers for $25 each. No where on the box did it say what model number it is or what bands they covered, or how much power they put out and I can’t imagine a new Ham being happy with spending money on an unknown quantity like that.

    We went to a church members house in the afternoon and we worked on our church float for the local Christmas parade. Our float is on a trailer and the front half has a manger scene with “Reason for the Season” signage and the manger shares a back wall that, seen from the side and rear is a home scene with a Christmas tree and a scene with little kids sitting in front of an older guy (not me) in a rocking chair reading the Christmas story to them. We have one more work day to put on the finishing touches and then the parade is December 7th and the DW and myself will be walking in front along with other members with buckets of candy to toss to the onlookers. My task is to make sure the older people and first responders in the crowd all get candy. It’s important to me to make sure they don’t have to compete with the kids for some sweets.

    Life goes on. I’m sitting my Ham shack back up and have done some maintenance on the antennas so they are all good to go. I’m woefully inadequate in 2 meter and higher gear and will start working on that soon. I have scanners that cover that portion of the bands and adequate receiver antennas but no transmit capability. I’m also looking for an Elmer to help me get into the other modes instead of spending my life on SSB and CW. I’m not too old to learn new tricks.

    Happy Veterans Day to everyone that is a Veteran or who stands beside one!

    Keep prepping, keep praying and don’t trust a politician or used car salesman.

    1. Cliff ,

      Went to a local prepper store yesterday (TruPrep) as they were having an 8th anniversary sale and had a lot of really good stuff at good prices. I blew my budget but got some good stuff. They were giving away door prizes. I won a Berkey Light filtration system and have add that to the stores along with the Big Berkey I already have and extra filters.

      Good haul, since shelter and water are two absolute requirements, any extra filtration you have on hand is always good.

      They were giving away a Glock 19 in a drawing and all you had to do was sit through a 15 minute “situational awareness” class. It was a good class, nothing new that I didn’t already know or practice but a good reminder.

      Even for we seasoned citizens a reminder is never a bad thing; but, more importantly, did you win the Glock? LOL

      They had a huge stack of Boefing 2 band transceivers for $25 each. No where on the box did it say what model number it is or what bands they covered, or how much power they put out and I can’t imagine a new Ham being happy with spending money on an unknown quantity like that.

      That’s not a bad price since the only dual band Baofeng / Pofung HT’s I know about are the UV-5, UV-82, & the UV-82HP, all with similar specs of 136-174 MHz and 400-480MHz running about 1 watt low power and 4 watts high power with the 82HP running 8 watts high power. I have several of the UV-5’s and normally carry a UV-82. One of the UV-5’s with an SMA to UHF (SO-239) adapter connected to a magnetic mount antenna and a 12 VDC cigarette lighter / auxiliary power plug and speaker microphone works as a portable / mobile system.

      the parade is December 7th and the DW and myself will be walking in front along with other members with buckets of candy to toss to the onlookers. My task is to make sure the older people and first responders in the crowd all get candy. It’s important to me to make sure they don’t have to compete with the kids for some sweets.

      Working with our local county EMA we work the parades, primarily to keep the kids in check, since the floats from many organizations toss candy to them, and sometimes when surrounded by a pile of candy, a kid will dart out into the street for that one errant piece that fell into the road.

      Life goes on. I’m sitting my Ham shack back up and have done some maintenance on the antennas so they are all good to go. I’m woefully inadequate in 2 meter and higher gear and will start working on that soon. I have scanners that cover that portion of the bands and adequate receiver antennas but no transmit capability.

      I easily cover 160 through 10 meters along with 2 meters, 220 (1.25 meters), & 440 (70 cm) with a big hole in 6 meters. As you know, prior to the national switch to HDTV, 6 meters 50-54 MHz was on top of TV channel 2 and was birtually unusable. I do have a newer mobile rig that covers 6 meters; but, don’t have it programmed or installed yet.
      For 2 meters & 70 cm, it looks like Douglasville has two open repeaters
      K4NRC: 145.1100 MHz -600 KHz 88.5 Hz PL
      W4SCR: 444.5750 MHz +5 MHz 88.5 Hz PL

      I’m also looking for an Elmer to help me get into the other modes instead of spending my life on SSB and CW. I’m not too old to learn new tricks.

      Over the last few years I’ve started using DMR (Digital Mobil Radio) that is popular around here; but, you should probably check you local area to see who’s using what, since the ”Digital” mode also include Yaesu System Fusion and
      D-STAR (Digital Smart Technologies for Amateur Radio), digital voice and data protocol specification for amateur radio. The system was developed by the Japan Amateur Radio League.
      All of these digital modes use the internet for linking repeaters and hot spots.

      1. Hey TOP,

        Nope, didn’t win the Glock 19 alas, but that’s OK. I daily carry my Glock 30S and am very happy with that. I was looking in the safe at some of my other handguns and it might be time to start trimming that tree. I went through a period when I would only carry .40 and then a time when only 9mm would do and now I’m stuck on .45. If I could figure out how to IWB my .44 magnum with it’s 6 inch barrel I’d carry that but it’s a non-starter.

        I miss running with the Ham crowd as I’m way behind on technology. I learn by listening and then doing and there is little to listen to from the locals around here. If you aren’t part of the clique or if you aren’t doing the monster power CB stuff you just aren’t part of the crowd. I’ll get active with the Hams but not the CB group sometime soon when things settle down a little bit. I will check out the repeaters you mentioned as I have a couple of old bricks that should be able to hit them at least for listening in. I do need a lot of help on the digital modes and will seek that out. I think for birthday/Christmas I might be getting a 2 meter rig since I’ve seen the HRO catalog open on the desk.

        I do worry about the kids darting out on the parade route. I walk closer to the crowd than the float so I don’t have to loft candy so far and so I can run up and gift to the older folks (er make that folks my age) and the First Responders. Even if they don’t want it they can pass it off to non-agressive kids who don’t get as much candy as the go getters.

        I don’t know if everyone else gets the same ads on the right side of the page, but I constantly have the one with the person whitening their teeth with what looks like liquid paper or white out. It moves really fast and is very disconcerting. (1) Simple Trick Erases Teeth Stains Like Magic, but it never scrolls off the page.

        Enjoy the week. Happy Veterans Day to all who have served.

        1. Cliff,

          Nope, didn’t win the Glock 19 alas, but that’s OK. I daily carry my Glock 30S and am very happy with that.

          I’m most likely going to purchase my first Glock in the next few weeks. I’ve shot them many times; but, they just didn’t come up in the queue until recently.

          I was looking in the safe at some of my other handguns and it might be time to start trimming that tree.

          I currently have 9 handguns; but, will be keeping them and adding the Glocl; but, I can shoot them right here on the property and they are often used for my training classes to have a variety of actions and controls on hand for the students.
          What I did a few years ago was slim down my long guns, selling 2 AR’s and all of my 12 gauge shotguns, standardizing on .410 bore & 20 gauge since my vision issues force me to shoot left handed and the pacemaker is on the left side. We do what we have to.

          I went through a period when I would only carry .40 and then a time when only 9mm would do and now I’m stuck on .45. If I could figure out how to IWB my .44 magnum with it’s 6 inch barrel I’d carry that

          I generally carry a .380 auto (9mm short) and a .38 special J-Frame, I can carry one of my 9mm Ruger’s; but, they are a bit heavy for my frame size and I’m hoping the Glock will fill that void.

          I miss running with the Ham crowd as I’m way behind on technology. I learn by listening and then doing and there is little to listen to from the locals around here. If you aren’t part of the clique

          That unfortunately is a common. Thing and when we reconstituted the local club a few years ago we made a conscious effort to not behave that way, and as a result, we’ve brought in more than 25 brand new hams in the past year, with two newly licensed just this past week.
          We run a net every Thursday @ 20:00 on the local machine. You can listen to it or other goings on, on the local machine by going to ohiohams.net and clicking the ”Scanner Feed” link.
          We also have an Echolink connection if you would like to join us.
          Email me for details if interested.

          if you aren’t doing the monster power CB stuff you just aren’t part of the crowd.

          No big CB presence around here; however, my shack and our ECC does have radios, primarily to listen to traffic conditions from the truckers as another Intel source, especially during bad weather, some of which is on the way.

          I’ll get active with the Hams but not the CB group sometime soon when things settle down a little bit.

          Good, I dropped away for a while also; but, enjoy the comradery and the ability to help with emergencies, even when it’s only weather watching.

          I will check out the repeaters you mentioned as I have a couple of old bricks that should be able to hit them at least for listening in.

          All I did was enter ”amateur repeated in Douglasville GA’ and got that list from the online repeater book entry. I otherwise know nothing about them, other than the listing said they were both OPEN.

          do need a lot of help on the digital modes and will seek that out. I think for birthday/Christmas I might be getting a 2 meter rig since I’ve seen the HRO catalog open on the desk.

          Interesting. My DW is licensed; but, doesn’t often mention things since I’m constantly encouraging her to upgrade from Novice to Technician and she tries to avoid the issue when she can.

          I do worry about the kids darting out on the parade route. I walk closer to the crowd than the float so I don’t have to loft candy so far and so I can run up and gift to the older folks

          That’s our big problem also. The people on the floats (mostly kids) have been admonished not to toss the candy too hard and potentially put out some eyes; but, at the same time, some of it doesn’t quite make it clear to the curb. Perhaps if we had professional candy throwers or people like you walking the route there would be a bit less chaos.

          I don’t know if everyone else gets the same ads on the right side of the page, but I constantly have the one with the person whitening their teeth with what looks like liquid paper or white out. It moves really fast and is very disconcerting. (1) Simple Trick Erases Teeth Stains Like Magic, but it never scrolls off the page.

          Yep we do. That teeth whitening video loop has been drawing criticism for quite a while, as do the static ads that simply just pop up here and there; but, I suspect each of those pay a bit to the site owner for placement, and keep this forum running without a subscription.
          Capitalism in action.

    2. I’d wanted to get something a bit more remote but that just hasn’t happened. I have just three acres. Not the 40 I’d have preferred. But it’s mine. Not financed and that’s something to be grateful for. It doesn’t look like a whole lot from the road. The south end of the property fronts on historic Route 66 and a short dirt road along a side. So its a corner property. It’s high mountain desert so it dry harsh country. 12″ average precipitation between summer rains and winter snows. I’m down sizing from nearly 3000 sq ft to under 900 sq ft. Easier to heat! Easier to clean but it means my sewing (7 sewing machines serious) and crafts are being set up in a nice wooden shed in the yard.
      My heater for the home is a rocket heater with optional gravity fed pellet hopper. The heat collector at 16″ across holds 3 gallons of warm water, a heat activated fan, a tea kettle or I can cook there.
      I choose to go 100% off grid for the home. One of the two wells I’ve drilled has commercial power. The others is capped but ready to set up with a manual winch. Later I plan to set it up on solar but keep the manual option.
      This week I harvested wild amaranth seed. We love the leaves better than spinach. Seeds will be some saved and some mixed with other seeds for micro greens grown in the kitchen windows. I left plenty for self seeding that area. All I do is scatter rabbit droppings there every couple of years and occasionally give it some water. That plot feeds us well from last spring frost to first hard winter freeze. I’m planting wild meds and foods if I haven’t found them already here. It doesn’t look like the rich garden area it is.
      We’ve been down to 3°. The coldest so far. January kind of temperatures in October and November. Makes me wonder January will be like.
      I’m working toward being close to food Independant. Not there yet but working on it. Raising chickens, ducks, rabbits, barn and house kitty’s. Adding fruit trees, berries, et.
      Thankful to still be able to do a lot of the needed work. Thankful for real friends that help. Thankful my husband is still with I me. At 81 with Alzheimer’s it could be very different. He’s getting feeble but still going and wants to help me.
      We have most of a years food, water in storage containers and 2 wells with plenty of water in them. One well is on commercial power. The other is capped but is able to hook up manually on a winch. Green houses are planned but injuries and surgeries had set me behind plans by a year. I hope the pit greenhouse can be started during breaks in the weather this winter. That and a root cellar would pretty well make us food independ as by.
      I’m thankful for the land, a few really good friends and life.

      1. Clergylady,

        I’d wanted to get something a bit more remote but that just hasn’t happened. I have just three acres. Not the 40 I’d have preferred.

        We have just a bit less than 8 acres and it’s plenty.
        We also own 1/3 interest in 200 acres with 178 of it cash rented to a nephew, so that’s another income source without a lot of work, and more acreage for hunting.

        But it’s mine. Not financed and that’s something to be grateful for.

        We’ve been mortgage free for about 20 years, and it is indeed a great place to be.

        It doesn’t look like a whole lot from the road.

        That’s true of this place and pretty much true of a lot of our neighbors; but, I think that’s a good thing, since it’s less likely to attract attention when it looks like an old farmstead and not a million dollar estate manor house.

        I’m downsizing from nearly 3000 sq ft to under 900 sq ft. Easier to heat! Easier to clean but it means my sewing (7 sewing machines serious) and crafts are being set up in a nice wooden shed in the yard.

        We recently added another building; but, it will be pretty much unheated but for the wood stove for making maple syrup.
        The main house is about 3100 ft2 with 4 bedrooms; but, we don’t try to keep all of the bedrooms Spic and Span, using two of them for storage since the kids are gone. Heating isn’t hard since over the years we’ve replaced all of the windows and doors, place fiberglass in the walls and blown in insulation in the attics, and recently finished things off with expanded foam in all of the walls.
        Heating is a propane gas forced air furnace, with two 30,000 BTU propane ventless heaters and an air tight wood burning fireplace insert for backups for the backups. We also have a few Mr. Buddy heaters and a cache of Terra Cotta pots that along with the Coleman and Butane camp stoves (or just candles) can add additional hear.
        It’s amazing what you can accomplish a little at a time when you live in one place for more than half your life.

        My heater for the home is a rocket heater with optional gravity fed pellet hopper. The heat collector at 16″ across holds 3 gallons of warm water, a heat activated fan, a tea kettle or I can cook there.

        We can heat water or cook using the fireplace; but, have a gas range with lots of propane, a 2-birner Coleman dual fuel stove & fuel, and a single burner butane stove with extra butane canisters. There are also a few small backpacking stoves with fuel and we could go outside to use the grill or build a campfire, so there are lots of options.

        I choose to go 100% off grid for the home. One of the two wells I’ve drilled has commercial power. The others is capped but ready to set up with a manual winch. Later I plan to set it up on solar but keep the manual option.

        We like having grid utilities like electric, phone, and internet; but, have means to live without them if any should go away

        I’m planting wild meds and foods if I haven’t found them already here. It doesn’t look like the rich garden area it is.

        Like the house, looks can be deceiving and are often good camouflage to keep out the riff raff, while providing real utility.

        Thankful to still be able to do a lot of the needed work. Thankful for real friends that help.

        It’s the same here. We count a lot on our neighbors, many of whom are youngsters in their 40’s. I can provide a lot of knowledge, insights, and perspectives they are yet to acquire, as most of us can if we put our minds to it.

        We have most of a years food, water in storage containers and 2 wells with plenty of water in them.

        We have more than a year for several people; but, as the time would go on, the food would require a lot more preparation such as sprouting & grinding grains.
        We also have a good well, a creek, and local ponds with numerous ways to make the water potable.
        Once again, 35 years chipping away at it often surprises even me.
        For instance, with the generator we really don’t need all of the lighting that’s ben collected over the years; but, it’s still here, so we’ll never be in the dark.

        I’m thankful for the land, a few really good friends and life.

        That’s a good place to be and something we should all be thankful for.

      1. Yes, I believe the address is 1000 Cobb Parkway North in Marietta.
        Kind of a run down building inside with lots of side rooms but they have a ton of stuff at really good prices plus an online presence.

        1. Cliff & Jean,

          Yes, I believe the address is 1000 Cobb Parkway North in Marietta.
          Kind of a run down building inside with lots of side rooms but they have a ton of stuff at really good prices plus an online presence.

          Just putting the word ”TruPrep” into a Google search shows that address in Marietta.
          It’s been a long time; but, I’ve been to Marietta and have an Uncle I think still lives there, although he would be in his 80’s. The last time I saw him he was in Stone Mountain.
          My father side of the family is a bit screwed up, so I really haven’t met most of his siblings more than a few times over the years.

          1. Hey Cliff. I thought that had to be the location (TruPrep) on Cobb Pkwy. I agree the store is older and has lots of room not being utilized at the moment, but the crew has done a great job, and are knowledgeable. There are what I call, a lot of ‘Walkers’ (throwback term I use from TWD show) in the area, and I’m certain theses guys deal with some real characters now and then.
            I get quite a few items there from time to time, but I sure hate I missed the free hot dogs!

          2. Jean,

            I’ve shopped there since they first opened and have gotten some great deals along the way. Most of my reloading gear came from there (along with what I inherited when my BIL passed away). I don’t reload much anymore since my eyesight is not the great close up (I’m deadly accurate at distance just not so good on the close up and fine detail stuff).

            I know they get a lot of folks who just wander in, touch everything and wander out so they have to have a lot of patience. The are very active on one of the gun trading sites http://www.theoutdoorstrader.com (if it’s allowed to put a link in here) and give free FFL transfers to the ODT folks (and I think most everyone else). They supported the design and delivery of the ODT AR15 lowers (alas I didn’t get one). It’s about a 45 minute ride to their place from my home in Douglasville (shorter if I was willing to do I20, to 285 North to 75 north but since they are all huge parking lots I go the back way.

            Take care, keep smiling and everyone will wonder what you are up to.

          3. Foremost, I wanted you to know I am sorry for your loss (sister). Our church is a staging area for any parade in the Marietta. Our local Scott group places American Flags on Veterans graves in the National Cemetary.

            God Bless ALL our veterans! Freedom is not free. Some paid dearly.

          4. Jean,

            Anytime you are in the area, your welcome at my homestead. Just let me know. Enjoy your posts!

            I appreciate the invitation; but, it’s highly unlikely we’ll ever be back in that area. The times I visited my uncle were back in my working years when I would sometimes travel for work. Since Atlanta was (is?) a main airline hub, I would often pass through there and on the way back home when time was less critical, could arrange a split flight or layover and visit; but, that was back in the late 1980’s.
            With my vision problems limiting my ability to drive, the DW is pretty much the family chauffeur, so trips are rather limited, with the 5+ hour recent trip back to PA the longest we’ve done in years.
            If babycatcher can pull together the meetup next spring when Overwatch makes his move, I’m thinking we may rent a van and take a small group down if we can time everything well enough. Grammyprepper and BLACK plus their significant others might make a good group that includes enough drivers to make the 6+ hour trip a little less stressful.

  14. Cold, wet weather has settled in here with more expected tonight. I am keeping busy inside working on quilts and other hand made gifts for Christmas.
    The local grocery store has put spices on sale for the holidays so I have stocked up. Also bought 2 cases of water. Picked up some meat at the locker. Waiting on the new pinto bean crop to hit the stores.

    I live in a rural area so not sure what a better location would be except maybe out in the county instead of town.
    I am really proud of how much food I put up this past summer. It takes a lot of work to grow enough to feed a family.
    Thanks to all of the veterans out there!

    1. Well, some of us were drafted and while we did not have to sign on the dotted line the goverment would certainly make our lives miserable if we didn’t so we reluctantly put our lives on hold and did what we could to make the experience less miserable. Remember, only a few percent of military members actually got shot at. The Atlantic and Europe still needed protecting so many of us went there.

      It cost me an 80 acre farm that my grandfather was going to sell to me because I wouldn’t be there to work it so he let his nephew have it. While I did not really enjoy my time in Service I did have interesting experiences I would not have had without being in the Navy.

      1. I came close to being drafted. There was a draft lottery in 1969 for the 1970 draft numbers and I came up as number 7. January 2nd I went shopping for a recruiters. Was going to join the Navy but that guy was closed for lunch so I went to see the Air Force guy. Took his test, few weeks later got my physical, and March 3rd was on the plane to Lackland Air Force Base in San Antonio, TX. After that I was off to Keesler AFB, Biloxi, MS, then after tech school I left for Elmendorf AFB in Achorage, Alaska, the to Clark Air Base in the Republic of the Philippines where I did several temporary duty trips to unnamed Fire Bases in unnamed parts of Vietnam where I did in fact get shot at and had to fight for my life more than once. After that adventure I reenlisted and started my trip to retirement at the end of 23 years as a Master Sergeant. During those years I was stationed in England, NSA, Crete, San Antonio and then my final 6 years in Northern Japan. I loved what I did, and would do it again if I were able and they wanted me but it’s a much younger mans job now. I’m glad I went, I’m glad I had the opportunity to serve and I was glad to see all those different parts of the world.

        Now I’m happy to never get on a plane again and will probably never leave this country again. I’m fine with that.

        When people say “thank you for your service” all I can say is “it was my pleasure”.

        1. Cliff,

          I never registered for the draft. I was 17 when I signed the papers for the Marine Corps. My recruiter told me not to bother, so I didn’t. I was 18 when I went to boot camp.

          When the recruiter came over to my house to get my parents to sign, he had to explain the delayed entry program. My dad pulled out his wallet and asked, “How much to take him right now?” The recruiter was a bit surprised. My mom was laughing.

          When we were done with the paperwork, my dad (a WWII Marine) and the recruiter went to a bar for some cold ones and some sea stories.

        2. Cliff ,

          I came close to being drafted. There was a draft lottery in 1969 for the 1970 draft numbers and I came up as number 7.

          Number 7 had to be interesting. I was #124; but, had a student deferment since I was already enrolled in college for engineering, a curriculum I completed and in which I enjoyed a 40+ year career.
          I’ve served with my county EMA for 20 years as a volunteer; but, that is obviously not quite the same. I am neither proud nor ashamed of my background, since it is what it is.

          January 2nd I went shopping for a recruiters. Was going to join the Navy but that guy was closed for lunch so I went to see the Air Force guy.

          I knew another guy who drew #7 and did join the navy. He spent his entire tour in Hawaii as a clerk and major domo to some command staff, so not all in the service during Vietnam were in the line of fire, although way too many were. The thing that most people do not understand about that conflict, is that it never had to happen; except for the typical obstinance of the French after WW II who insisted on taking their colony (French Indochina) back into their control

          When people say “thank you for your service” all I can say is “it was my pleasure”

          Thank you and all the others for your service

  15. Hey guys!
    It has been quite a week. The days are shorter, with time change. Evening chores now start at 4 PM.
    New Saanen nannies arrived this week. Large bodied in length and width. Will make hanging weigh similart to a deer and are rated #1 milkers in the world.
    Worked on the greenhouse some. Purchased a new woodburner for main heating source, you know we need backup heating sources plus additional fire brick, extra double walled insulated pipes etc. Should economy be gone, or other societal problems, you need backup items on hand- not I have to run to town or maybe the bank, that just might be closed temporarily or permanently. Plus rush on stores for materials. Be your own resource store.
    Tara’s questions:
    My dream prepper retreat would me to move my place to a much more remote location.
    I am so very greatful, from a prepper point of view for the greenhouse, and new additions to livestock. Greatful to find replacement for main woodburner and food on hand. God is so very good!!!

    1. Sage,

      It has been quite a week. The days are shorter, with time change. Evening chores now start at 4 PM.

      I think like me you’re in Ohio where we complain; but, it’s really not all that bad on the western edge of the time zone. My DD and Overwatch are out in Mass on the eastern edge where this light to dark transition is much more pronounced like someone switching off a lamp, an hour earlier than here.

      Should economy be gone, or other societal problems, you need backup items on hand- not I have to run to town or maybe the bank, that just might be closed temporarily or permanently. Plus rush on stores for materials. Be your own resource store.

      You should see the contents of my Granary (the smaller of the two barns) were we probably have enough materials to build, wire, and plumb a small house.
      Our only problem is that the raccoons like to get in and tear things up for no apparent reason.

      Someday when we’re gone, the kids will wonder what the heck we were thinking.

    2. I know exactly how you feel. I’m thankful for the greenhouse that we recently added to the homestead. And I love my Saanens. I also have Alpines. I’m always excited for kidding season, even with our few goats.

  16. Granted almost everybody on the eastern half of the US is going to suffer more than us from the latest Arctic Blast, but we were forecast to be at +10 this morning, clear and cold, after Sunday being wet with some light snow. It’s actually -2 with light snow (probably over a thin sheet of ice). The “line-of-march” for the storm is about 100 miles east of us. I think my family in OK is going to be worse off than we will be.

    I will be taking the DW to work this morning, then doing some shopping while taking full advantage of free Veteran Day meals around town. Just not looking forward to those who are in a hurry.

  17. TOP,,,,
    Me too. I put up extra sawed lumber to build a 12×16′ story and a half, plus extra wood burner, large one from Tractor Supply, I only used it about 6 months and saved it for, just in case. Extra pitcher pump and water supply tank, septic in, concrete poured and concrete block stocked. Still need more steel roofing, I’ll get it done. Extra sink, granite top for counter in kitchen, extra toilet, marble top vanity and shower set up. Extra lighting fixtures, romex etc. Are we related?
    You are right, your kids will think we are all nuts.

    Gotta get chili for lunch and put closed Ondura corners on greenhouse, plus move barrels of strawberries out there.

    Woman’s work is never done.

    1. Sage,

      Are we related?

      Maybe not genetically; but, like all preppers, we tend to save things that might be useful for later projects that may only still be in our heads. A few years ago I purchased a set of hangers on sale @ Harbor Freight and the DW asked me what they were for. When I said I might need them she just shook her head and dropped the subject. On the back wall of our new building, I mounted those hangers and we now keep a ladder and a few other items there. I have a hundred project ideas in my head, and sometimes you see just the right item for the right price and know you need it.

      You are right, your kids will think we are all nuts.

      Actually they already do; but, all appreciate the materials and DIY to some extent. The boys were 12 & 16 when we married and I would often drag them on weekends to the house I previously purchased and was rehabbing. They would complain about being free slave labor; but, both boys now do a lot of their own work on their houses, and have saved a ton of money. When we last visited the oldest boy, he had one of his bathrooms torn up and under construction, describing what it would eventually look like when finished. The youngest boy often gets the guys in his neighborhood in trouble with their wives, when they ask why they can’t have the new floor, or deck, or other improvement like Doris (his DW) has.
      BTW, that house where I used all the slave labor was eventually sold and paid off this place some 20+ years ago.

      Woman’s work is never done.

      You don’t have to be sexist, since a homesteader or for that matter any home owner will never quite complete their work.

  18. I heard the call ,and I went ,,
    I soldierd in the sun ,,
    I soldierd in the shadows
    I soldierd long after day was done

    A warrior I an
    A warrior I will be
    For the warrior curse is upon me

    Peace for me can not be
    For you see,warriors blood is in me
    Try as I might the warrior in me,
    Won’t let me be

    Day and night tho the guns are still ,
    The dead amid the cold ground ,peace have found
    But for me peace is not to be
    In my sleep the guns still roar ,
    The blood still flows ,
    The smell of fear and death , that robbs sleep from me,and won’t let me be,

    Try as I might ,try as I will that distant drum just won’t be still ,
    I fought for for peace and those I love ,,,,,
    The price I pay is peace and those I loved

    History was written with my blood ,,
    But peace and those I love of this history should not know,,
    Lest the warriors curse prosper and grow

    April 75 ,learning to live again ,

      1. Almost there,,,,,

        Thanks ,been 50 years ,time heals ,one learns to avoid some things ,and that it’s ok to cry,and to love again ,

    1. Almost There,

      WOW… This is why there is no food on the shelves.

      This could be part of it; but, unfortunately much of the Midwest farmland lies on flood plains of the Mississippi and Missouri river basins. I was working with a company in Des Moines Iowa in the 1990’s and a similar thing happened back then.
      Now called ”The Great Flood of 1993” affected a large area from May through September along the Mississippi and Missouri Rivers and their tributaries (read as flood plains).
      Flooding occurred across the Dakotas, Nebraska, Kansas, Minnesota, Iowa, Missouri, Wisconsin, and Illinois causing in over 50 deaths and billions of dollars in damages.
      While Ohio farms are not in quite the same situation, spring rains the past few years have made planting and harvesting a dicey business; but, most farmers simply try to carry on.
      Those in urban and suburban areas may well see price increases and shortages, which is yet another reason for us to prep and have supplies purchased and stored ahead along with raising as much food as we can.

      1. High mountain desert here (nearly 6300 ft). Pinion, a type of regional pine is stressed by decades of drought. Boarer beetles are killing the weakened trees. Sad really. The pine nuts are our only native nut here. Wood is premium because so little grows here. I’ve seen -20° nights, weeks on end in mid winter. And single digit humidity is common. We don’t have the lush growth and variety of more humid places. Folks here name wild plants.. Foods and medicinals that I haven’t seen or heard of since childhood. We don’t even have plaintain. Dandelions are rare until you get into cities with green lawns. No way do I want a green lawn. It becomes a place for rattlesnakes to hideout. I’d rather see those mousers on the dirt where I’m more apt to really see them before I hear them. Also a water hog like green grass isn’t practical in a 12″ precipitation climate. I’m not crazy about colored gravel for landscaping either but if I’m going to water It I’d best be able to eat most of it.
        I did buy two chuck roasts this past week. Buy one get one free. I made stew with one that has fed us 3 meals and company and us and 2 more meals. That’s a lot of good eating for one afternoon of simmered goodness. The other roast is frozen till I get more canning jars then I’ll can it for future meals. I have cabbage and some ground beef to make cabbage rolls tomorrow. I do have a few pint jars left so I’ll can some cabbage rolls for future eating. I try to make a meal for now with some for later either the same or with just minor changes. I used up a lot of those jars of meals ahead when I had surgery on my hand, wrist and forearm. Now I’m starting to restock meals ahead. I want to pick up more instant mashed potatoes, cream of mushroom soup, and crushed tomatoes. They store easily and help make tasty fast meals. I should get sugar to start setting back again. I finished what was on hand canning apples this Fall. Don’t forget sugar is a preservative on fruit. A simple sugar fruit mixture cooked down makes wonderful jam. It will keep A couple of weeks without refrigeration. A bit of sugar in your sourdough helps feed the wild yeast better than flour and water alone.

        1. Clergylady,

          The pine nuts are our only native nut here.

          I’ve actually had some pine nuts and they are rather good; but, a bit expensive here.

          single digit humidity is common.

          I know. I co founded a company 35 years ago and sold out to my partner when he and his family wanted to move to AZ. I’ve been there to visit and they kept pushing water on me due to the low humidity. A bit of research showed you can lose a liter of water a day, just sitting around & breathing. Not my idea of fun.

          Dandelions are rare until you get into cities with green lawns.

          I think dandelions and clover are one of our state flowers, at least in the rural areas where we don’t weed & feed. We just let them grow for bee food; but, occasionally pull some clover for the chickens that love them.

          Also a water hog like green grass isn’t practical in a 12″ precipitation climate. I’m not crazy about colored gravel for landscaping either but if I’m going to water It I’d best be able to eat most of it.

          I know; but, I still saw grass and small pools out in AZ. Here our yearly average is about 38”; but, so far this year, we’ve measured 37.8 here with November & December snowfall yet to come and be counted.

          I did buy two chuck roasts this past week. Buy one get one free. I made stew with one that has fed us 3 meals and company and us and 2 more meals. That’s a lot of good eating for one afternoon of simmered goodness. The other roast is frozen till I get more canning jars then I’ll can it for future meals.

          We eat a lot of beef cooked various ways and are still sitting on north of 300 lbs frozen from the half beef we purchased 18 months ago.

          I have cabbage and some ground beef to make cabbage rolls tomorrow.

          I think we may have some cabbage also and that sounds good.

          I try to make a meal for now with some for later either the same or with just minor changes.

          We do the same, always making enough for several meals at a time. This keeps the microwave oven rather busy; but, is very handy.

          I should get sugar to start setting back again. I finished what was on hand canning apples this Fall. Don’t forget sugar is a preservative on fruit. A simple sugar fruit mixture cooked down makes wonderful jam.

          We still have 30-40 lbs of Cane sugar on hand and simple jellies, especially with high pectin fruits like apples, are indeed easy.

          A bit of sugar in your sourdough helps feed the wild yeast better than flour and water alone.

          We always just added a sugar, flour, water mixture; but, our sourdough has been done for most of 30 years, due to lack of interest. The problem with sourdough is that it ”requires” one to use and feed it in a timely manner.

          1. I’m in New Mexico but much of Arizona is much like NM. We have some green mountains, high mountain desert and lower hotter desert. We can get a 3′ snow but are more likely to be below zero with dry grounded or a little snow. The mountain above us normally gets enough snow for winter snowshoeing and skiing. I live in the foothills area of the mountain. While the mountain has snow we stay below freezing. Most stone fruits may survive here but only bear fruit about every seventh year. Apples do well. And we have native tiny black sour cherries and small red wild plums. Most years those make fruit.

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