Prepping

Fish Antibiotics for Survival

antibiotic pills

One of the major issues many preppers face in preparing for a grid down or SHTF scenario is what to do about illnesses, infections, and injuries that are bound to happen. The world will be in chaos. Doctors and pharmacies will be overrun quickly. Public services will be overwhelmed or possibly shut down entirely.

Preparing now, to deal with illness, disease, and injury, by adding fish antibiotics to your stockpile, is one more way to tip the odds in your favor when SHTF. In truth, fish antibiotics for survival is a pretty controversial topic. There are some who believe it to be insanity. But others swear that fish antibiotics can save human lives. You’ll ultimately have to decide for yourself, all I can provide is information to help you decide.

Your first line of defense is, of course, prevention. But you won’t be able to wrap yourself or loved ones in a bubble to keep them from getting sick or injured when SHTF.

Luckily, many symptoms of illnesses, injuries, and diseases can be treated with standard first aid supplies that are readily available and easy to stockpile. Still others can be treated or healed with readily accessible medicinal herbs and plants that can be foraged or cultivated.

Disclaimer

The advice in this article is for information purposes only. Neither the author nor www.thesurvivalistblog.net shall be held liable for any adverse effects as a result of using the advice presented here. Consult your physician before purchasing or using fish antibiotics.

Serious Bacterial Infections Require Antibiotics

But if you or a loved one gets a tooth abscess, comes down with a respiratory bacterial infection, or ends up with an infected wound, what will you do? Serious bacterial infections require antibiotics and without them, you or your loved one could die. For many people, this fear leads to stockpiling antibiotics, just in case.

You can ask your regular physician to prescribe an extra ten or 14 days worth of penicillin perhaps. But one extra dose of antibiotics isn’t much. And one type of antibiotic isn’t a cure all for the many different infections you could get. In today’s world, physicians increasingly fear resistance to antibiotics and therefore are limiting the times and frequency with which they will prescribe antibiotics.

There aren’t any physicians who will prescribe you large amounts of several different types of antibiotics so you can keep them in your stockpile. This has made it difficult for preppers to stockpile antibiotics and store them for a SHTF scenario.

So what can you do? How can you get antibiotics without a prescription so you can stockpile them for the future? More and more people are considering fish antibiotics as a potential solution.

Keep reading for more information on the benefits of fish antibiotics. We’ll explain some of the mystery in fish antibiotics, how to choose the right fish antibiotics, and give you some suggestions on where to buy fish antibiotics for your stockpile.

Do Fish Antibiotics Really Cure Bronchitis in Fish?

If you had fish as a kid you probably remember having to treat their water with medicine at some point during their short life span. That treatment was likely an antibiotic in the forms of drops or powder designed for fish and made to be absorbed through their skin. As an adult, you have heard preppers talking about taking fish antibiotics and you’ve maybe even clicked a link or two and thought about buying some yourself. But have you ever wondered why fish antibiotics come in pill form? Fish can’t take pills, can they?

If you read some of the reviews for fish antibiotics on Amazon, you might get confused by the comments about “fish” getting bronchitis the week before a new job or having infected gums and being cured with fish mox pills. But don’t worry, fish don’t really get bronchitis or infected gums. These are actual people posting reviews of fish antibiotics and referring to their loved ones or themselves as “fish”. In fact, many people buy fish antibiotics because they are cheaper than prescription antibiotics.

Can Humans Use Fish Antibiotics?

The short answer is yes, humans can and do use fish antibiotics. In fact, there’s a growing trend, especially in America, of humans buying fish antibiotics for their own ailments. It’s a common practice for preppers. In reality, manufacturers know this, which is why they are making fish antibiotics in pill form and selling them. They know they are walking a fine legal line which is why it’s so difficult to find solid information on fish antibiotics for humans.

Many preppers do buy different types of fish antibiotics in large quantities over time and add them to their survival stockpile as a way of getting around needing a prescription for antibiotics. But if you’re going to use fish antibiotics or any other animal antibiotics, you must do your research, understand that there ARE risks involved, and be sure what you’re getting is what you believe it is.

Why Use Fish Antibiotics?

It’s ALWAYS more advisable to see a doctor and be properly diagnosed and treated whenever possible. That said, the reasons people use fish antibiotics are varied and include:

  • You can buy fish antibiotics without a prescription which makes them easier to stockpile than prescribed antibiotics.
  • If you stockpile fish antibiotics now, you can have the ability to treat infections and other illnesses post-SHTF when doctors and pharmacies are inaccessible.
  • Typically, fish antibiotics are cheaper to buy than prescription antibiotics.
  • Some people just really don’t like or trust doctors and would rather treat themselves.

How to Choose Fish Antibiotics for Survival

Once you decide you want to try fish antibiotics, the dilemma then becomes how to choose the right antibiotics for your needs. Just like antibiotics for humans, there are different kinds of fish antibiotics. It’s really important to get the antibiotic that will work for the type of infection you have and will be absorbed the right way and to the right location. So, the first place to start is to know what kind of bacterial infection you have or as much as you can about what it is so you can choose the fish antibiotic that is best.

The single best way to know what kind of bacterial infection you have is to visit the doctor and be diagnosed with a lab test. But when SHTF, this probably won’t be possible. So in a survival scenario, you will have to determine for yourself if taking the wrong fish antibiotic is worth the risk. In most cases, taking the wrong antibiotic won’t kill you directly but it can lead to death if the right treatment isn’t taken quickly.

All pharmaceutical antibiotics for humans are required to be imprinted and coded. Fish antibiotics in pill form also have to be coded and imprinted. Do not take ANY pills that are blank or do not have a legible imprint and code. Use this pill identifier to make certain you have the fish antibiotics that you think. USP certified and pharmaceutical grade labels can not be relied upon when it comes to fish antibiotics, so be cautious of false promises.

Most Commonly Taken Antibiotics Include:

  • Penicillin 500 mg – look for Fish Pen Forte
  • Amoxicillin 500 mg- is called Fish Mox

Additional Choices:

  • Ciprofloxacin 500 mg – Fin Flox
  • Ampicillin 250 mg- order Fish Cillin
  • Cephalexin 500 mg-Fish Flex Forte
  • Clindamycin 150 mg-Fish Cin
  • Metronidazole 500 mg- Fish Zole

Since I’m not a physician, I cannot give you advice about your medical situation. So, I won’t get into which antibiotic should be taken for different kinds of infections. You’ll need to determine what kind of infection you have and then research which human antibiotic and dosage is appropriate. Once you know the human type of antibiotic, dosage, and length of treatment is needed, you can have a pretty good idea which fish antibiotics to buy for your stockpile by looking at the above lists.

But honestly, in a SHTF situation, if you take nothing, you die from infection, so having some of these on hand to try could just save your life.

My recommendation is to find a physician NOW who will work with you so that instead of using antibiotics from the pharmacy, you can try the equivalent in fish antibiotics now. This will help you to know which antibiotics to choose and will let you experiment while medical supervision and emergency help is still available if things go awry.

Where Can I Buy Fish Antibiotics

One of the most common questions people ask me about fish antibiotics for survival, is “where can I buy fish antibiotics?” One of the key things is that you do you research on your own and buy from a reputable manufacturer. I recommend purchasing online and that you do not buy from Craig’s List, EBay, etc.

One of the most trusted brands for fish antibiotics in the prepping community is ThomasLabs. This is where my own research led me and this is the only source I will buy from. There are tons of companies that offer ThomasLabs brand fish antibiotics. But you still must do your own research, then check the pills you receive using the pill identifier once they arrive. There are no regulations on fish antibiotics so USP and Pharmaceutical grade labels can be misleading.

Warnings About Using Fish Antibiotics for Prepping

Dosages

Taking the wrong dosage or the wrong type of antibiotic can be dangerous. In addition, taking medication that isn’t what you believe it is or which has other ingredients or fillers, can cause allergic reactions or other problems.

Storage of Fish Antibiotics

Just like prescription antibiotics and OTC medications, fish antibiotics can be susceptible to improper storage conditions. Make sure that you follow all manufacturer instructions for properly storing your fish antibiotics. Rotate what you have so that your freshest medication is in your stockpile.

Diagnosis

If you have a viral or parasitic issue going on, and not a bacterial infection, antibiotics won’t help. Whenever possible, you should be diagnosed by a physician who can advise you as to the proper type of human antibiotic, dosage and course of treatment so you can find the equivalent in fish antibiotics.

Antibiotic Resistance

Using antibiotics when you don’t really need them increases resistance, something scientists believe is the reason for the increase in antibiotic-resistant superbugs. If you stop taking the fish antibiotics before the recommended course of treatment is over, you risk that infection lying dormant and coming back even stronger and more resistant. It’s just as important to take fish antibiotics for the full course of treatment as it is for prescribed antibiotics.

Risk of Using Fish Antibiotics

Fish antibiotics are not FDA approved for human consumption. There is risk associated with using any animal antibiotics for humans as they are not regulated. Some manufacturers add fillers and additives to their fish antibiotics which are not safe for humans to ingest. Fillers and additives can also interact with other medications you may be taking or cause you to have an allergic reaction.

What Else Is Out There?

In addition to adding fish antibiotics to your survival stockpile, research and identify what else is out there that can help you keep yourself and your family alive if you get sick or hurt in a survival situation. Consider not only stockpiling fish antibiotics but also stocking up on OTC medications, and growing or foraging for medicinal plants and herbs that can be made into tinctures and ointments for use when needed.

Another little known fact is that studies have shown that many people don’t get sufficient vitamins and minerals in their diets. In fact, many people could be suffering from various ailments including fatigue, weak bones, and a weakened immune system right now because of a vitamin or mineral deficiency. Without the proper level of minerals and vitamins, your body cannot function the way it’s supposed to work.

Consider ways to add the following vitamins and minerals to your diet both now and if you find yourself in a SHTF or survival situation:

  • Magnesium
  • Vitamin E
  • Potassium
  • Vitamin D3
  • Sulfur
  • Vitamin A
  • Calcium
  • Iron
  • Fiber
  • Vitamin B12
  • Vitamin C

Have you considered using or stockpiling fish antibiotics for survival? Are you already using fish antibiotics or other natural remedies to treat pain or other illnesses? Share your thoughts or experiences in the comments below.

Megan Stewart

About Megan Stewart

A mother of four and grandmother of nine boys and one girl, Megan is living the lifestyle any prepper would want. Gardening, homesteading and constantly planning for emergencies big and small, she's a beacon of knowledge in the prepping community.
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18 thoughts on “Fish Antibiotics for Survival

  1. Have you considered using or stockpiling fish antibiotics for survival? Are you already using fish antibiotics or other natural remedies to treat pain or other illnesses? Share your thoughts or experiences in the comments below.

    I have not and will explain why here once I look up some of the information everyone needs, since there are many better, safer, and less expensive ways to manage antibiotics and infections, post SHTF.

  2. In truth, fish antibiotics for survival is a pretty controversial topic. There are some who believe it to be insanity. But others swear that fish antibiotics can save human lives. You’ll ultimately have to decide for yourself, all I can provide is information to help you decide.

    While I don’t think it is insanity, it is however IMHO, a fad for those who don’t want to spend the time and effort to find real human antibiotics. There are several places and methods to do so that I will list here.

    You can ask your regular physician to prescribe an extra ten or 14 days worth of penicillin perhaps. But one extra dose of antibiotics isn’t much. And one type of antibiotic isn’t a cure all for the many different infections you could get. In today’s world, physicians increasingly fear resistance to antibiotics and therefore are limiting the times and frequency with which they will prescribe antibiotics.

    This is true; but, really comes down to how well informed and educated you are as a patient, and what kind of rapport you have with your primary care physician, which means of course having a primary care doctor and building a relationship over time. That relationship will also involve you being educated so you can discuss the topics with your doctor at a level where they are comfortable that you will not misuse medications if they prescribe extra.

    There aren’t any physicians who will prescribe you large amounts of several different types of antibiotics so you can keep them in your stockpile. This has made it difficult for preppers to stockpile antibiotics and store them for a SHTF scenario.

    Actually, there can be; but, you need to do what I described above, and that takes time, effort, and study.

    So what can you do? How can you get antibiotics without a prescription so you can stockpile them for the future? More and more people are considering fish antibiotics as a potential solution.

    True; but, after reading this, [perhaps they’ll have other options to get real antibiotics.

    Once you decide you want to try fish antibiotics, the dilemma then becomes how to choose the right antibiotics for your needs. Just like antibiotics for humans, there are different kinds of fish antibiotics. It’s really important to get the antibiotic that will work for the type of infection you have and will be absorbed the right way and to the right location. So, the first place to start is to know what kind of bacterial infection you have or as much as you can about what it is so you can choose the fish antibiotic that is best.

    It has nothing to do with the medication being absorbed the right way or to the right place; but, what kind of bacteria is causing the infection. Bacteria in general come in two types, gram positive and gram negative, and the PDR (Physicians Desk Reference) or the data sheet with the antibiotic will tell what the medication is most effective against. Telling the difference requires a few solutions and a microscope.
    Gram’s method of staining has several steps: a sample of bacteria is placed on a microscope slide, then is stained and “fixed” with iodine. … Gram-positive cells will retain the stain even after being washed in the solvent, but the stain will be removed from the gram-negative cells.
    You can find the details and the solutions at various places online including this one: https://www.homesciencetools.com/product/gram-stain-lab-kit/

    Antibiotic Resistance

    Using antibiotics when you don’t really need them increases resistance, something scientists believe is the reason for the increase in antibiotic-resistant superbugs. If you stop taking the fish antibiotics before the recommended course of treatment is over, you risk that infection lying dormant and coming back even stronger and more resistant. It’s just as important to take fish antibiotics for the full course of treatment as it is for prescribed antibiotics.

    The resistant bacteria isn’t lying dormant, it simply does not get killed unless you take the entire dose of antibiotic. Over the years people have tried to save money, by taking only a portion of their prescribed antibiotic and stopping when they felt better, so they could keep the extra for potential later use. This is where people have to follow the instructions of physicians AND get themselves educated on how and why things work instead of believing the myths that are unfortunately abundant in the prepper community.
    While one may not legally possess certain medications, e.g. narcotics like Oxycodone unless they are prescribed to you and kept in their original container, there is no prohibition on other medications like antibiotics. I am lucky enough to have a good relationship with my Primary Care Doc and to have an Emergency Physician in my MAG; but, for those who don’t have these relationships, you can easily purchase real human antibiotics from the “All Day Chemist” (https://www.alldaychemist.com/) instead of trying to determine what the proper medication and dosage should be from fish antibiotics.
    Like most things related to prepping, you need knowledge and skill, both of which are only gained by taking the time to study and practice. Doing this study to gain the skills and acquire the resources needed prior to a bad event is just one of the costs of being self reliant.
    In today’s world of the internet with search engines and free information on nearly any and every subject, there is no reason to continue to believe myths when a little time and effort can get you real survival information.

  3. I stock a wide variety of fish antibiotics from Thomas Labs. Medications that are labeled “vet grade” are pharmacologically indistinguishable from medications labeled for human use. All medications sold in the U.S, have a unique imprint and shape, as the article notes. (There’s not a separate imprint/shape for “vet” antibiotics.) If you have a physician or nurse in your prepping circle, that is the best place for advise (post collapse). I have a copy of the Physician’s Desk Reference, which I think every prepper should have. If you are new to prepping, check out Patriot Nurse’s video on fish antibiotics.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZaL4fLXXEJg

    1. Bam Bam,

      If you have a physician or nurse in your prepping circle, that is the best place for advise (post collapse).

      We are lucky enough to have both an E.R. doc and a Nurse Practitioner in our group.

      I have a copy of the Physician’s Desk Reference, which I think every prepper should have. If you are new to prepping, check out Patriot Nurse’s video on fish antibiotics.

      I also have a PDR; but, all of the same information is available online. New ones can cost $250.00; but, ones a few years old can be had for less than $10.00.
      Instead of fish med, you can get real human meds here: https://www.alldaychemist.com/
      I think it’s best to get the real thing when it’s available.

      1. O,P.,

        I got a used PDR on Amazon for just a few bucks. There are some books that I think should be kept in hard copy. If the grid goes down, we won’t be able to access the PDR online. Thanks for the link. I will check them out. Are they reputable?

        1. Bam Bam,

          I got a used PDR on Amazon for just a few bucks. There are some books that I think should be kept in hard copy.

          I’ve seen them for under $10.00 and often older copies are available when the library sells off their old, out of date books.

          If the grid goes down, we won’t be able to access the PDR online.

          I routinely snag things like data sheets and save them locally as PDF’s. Even if the grid / Internet goes down, I will have access to my locally stored electronic documents for quite some time, after which they can be printed.

          Thanks for the link. I will check them out. Are they reputable?

          Two members of my MAG have used them successfully for several years. I’ve not had to yet, since both my primary care doc and my E.R. doc friend have accommodated my needs thus far.

  4. I also recommend Dr. Bones and Nurse Amy as a resource regarding antibiotic use in a ‘shtf’ situation. They recently published a book on this topic. As a ‘medical professional’, I can attest that the same antibiotics you give your animal (fish/birds/livestock) are the same as what ppl are given. It is a matter of dosage, as well as knowing what antibiotic is appropriate for what situation. That is why a PDR is a good resource, as well as info from Doom and Bloom. Their Survival Medicine book should be a part of any prepper library IMHO. And no, I don’t get any sort of compensation for promoting them.

    https://www.doomandbloom.net/

  5. AND, having a few years old PDR is okay…you might not have some of the ‘newer’ medications listed, but the information about the ‘tried and true’ older medications isn’t going to change much.

    1. Grammyprepper,

      AND, having a few years old PDR is okay…you might not have some of the ‘newer’ medications listed, but the information about the ‘tried and true’ older medications isn’t going to change much.

      Thanks for the clarification. I mentioned older used versions being less expensive by a lot; but, failed to mention that some of the older ones I have were only a few dollars, picked up at local library book sales.

  6. My issue is if your supposed to be rotating the fish meds, and are not sick, or don’t need this type of meds, what’s the point?? I have thought about it but I have never bought any yet. Again depending on what’s going on we are all going to be stuck with what we have or know.

    1. If you are purchasing online, you may have no choice as to expiration dates. If buying at say, the local feed store, you can look for items with the furthest expiration date. Also note that many medsare known to be safe and effective way beyond their expiration dates. The Army, I believe, did testing on decades old medications they had, antibiotics included. IF they are really old, they might lose some strength/efficacy. There are some medications that should not be used/stored beyond expiration dates, that includes any liquid medications and I believe, inhaled medications. Two medications that absolutely should not be used beyond expiration dates are insulins and nitroglycerin.

      So Mom of Three, I think it’s safe to store some fish meds, if you are so inclined, without too much worry about expiration. However, if you do choose to store them, make sure someone in your group knows how to properly use them/have a good reference on hand so you know what to use when. On the other hand, if you are more comfortable utilizing natural things, herbs, homeopathy, etc. store those items and use them with confidence, with the same type of supporting information.

  7. fish antibiotics are identical to the perscribed ones with the exception that no doctor is involved and they cannot guarantee them as safe (if someone screws up big time taking them the company is not liable since it was marketed for fish, thus it was improperly used, its a legal way for the manufacurur to cover their arses).

    that said i have used them to treat infections. i had a bad gum abcess in 2012 and local dentists refused to see me unless i had insurance, even when i walked into the office and slapped $1000 cash on the desk to show i could afford it they refused to schedule and apontment without insurance. i was in so much pain having to use needles to drain it over several months that i even tried signing up for welfare insurance at the county office. howevr it was denied (i was laid off months before from my job as a tribal forester and had no income, i was also off grid and their reason for denial was based on my “refusal” to give them my last 3 months electric bills since the insurance was based on financial eligability and all i could show them was name, address, and ss number). ended up going to the emergency room paying $800 to get a perscrip for antibiotics (which cost $20 at the pharmacy), i refused the perscription pain killers they also tried perscribing. that worked to stop the infetion but the tooth was terrible and was reinfected. the er gave me amoxacillen 500mg for it, so i researched at home options and learned about fish mox, so i got 500mg tablets which were identicle to what the pharmacy gave me. ended up using them as needed to keep the infections in check until i found an oral surgeon in the next state over that would do the work for cash, cost me $400 out of pocket and a 7 hour round trip drive but they removed the tooth (it broke off at the gum line, needed a surgeon to get the rest).

    i keep a supply of fish mox on hand after that, only using the dose that i was perscribed before. i been denied medical care for bullshit reasons so many times i just deal with it myself now.

    1. Nemoseto,

      i had a bad gum abcess in 2012 and local dentists refused to see me unless i had insurance, even when i walked into the office and slapped $1000 cash on the desk to show i could afford it they refused to schedule and apontment without insurance.

      While I don’t doubt you, you need to shop around the dentists in your area. We have had no dental insurance for years; but, routinely see our local dentist, generally putting the cost of the visit on a credit card, that is paid in full at the end of the billing cycle. This is where you need to establish a relationship with your dentist or other medical professional so you can be seen when needed; otherwise, regular patients get service first. It may not seem fair; but, that’s how it works.

  8. Nemoseto raises a good point–I would only take antibiotics that I had previously been prescribed (unless I had no real choice–i.e., life or death situation). My dh is allergic to penicillin. So I have all my bottles of antibiotics labeled “Safe for Dh” or “Poison for Dh.”

    1. thats the point i was making with my comment, unfortunatly i know people who use them for anything, a lot of the amish around here take them for colds or the flu thinking they are magic cure alls.

  9. I would just like people to know, as I have looked everywhere and had little to no information about the powder form of fish antibiotics, I have just used “API” fish doxycyline. It was a blue and white package. I used this powder with between 2-8 ounces of water, mixed up well , I had a staph infection on my leg that had cellulitis as well. For the lack of information and my lack of money for a doctor visit I decided to try this on my own. I would like to state here that I had absolutely great results! Infection was gone within 4 days of taking this product. Again I post this comment in case somone for whatever reason has procured the powder make of fish antibiotics well I had great success infact they may well have saved my leg. Not much if any information about the powder is available so you folks have read it here. To be clear it was API DOXYCYCLINE used for staph infection and treated with one packet (mix it well tastes very strongly like salt) twice a day then 1 packet a day. Refer to the blog for more information.
    GOOD LUCK PEOPLE !

    1. Jonathin,

      I would just like people to know, as I have looked everywhere and had little to no information about the powder form of fish antibiotics,

      Antibiotics, whether fish or human should have information on their potency, generally in milligrams per tablet, or per packet for the powder. Simply taking some without knowing the dosage is not a good idea.
      Doxycycline, a form of Tetracycline can have adverse effects, from G.I. issues to photo sensitivity and should not be used in pregnant women.
      It may also be ineffective on some types of staph infections.
      The therapeutic dosage for adults Oral: Doxycycline: 100 to 200 mg/day (up to 400 mg / day for some indications). One should not just experiment with this stuff, since a combination of overuse and misuse is how we get the antibiotic resistant bacteria.
      You can also purchase human antibiotics here instead of playing with the fish antibiotics: https://www.alldaychemist.com/
      Good luck.

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